Limited and External Funding Opportunities

Contact us...

  • Email LSO@vanderbilt.edu if you are interested in an opportunity not listed below or have questions regarding the LSO submission process.

 

Have you been awarded a Limited Submission recognition?

Please let us know at LSO@vanderbilt.edu


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Active Internal Calls for Limited Submission Nominations 

Internal review process required to choose institutional nominees


Limited Submission Eligibility Guidelines

The following tags serve as a guide for submission instructions.

 Vanderbilt (VU + VUMC):  

  • VU and VUMC submit collaboratively to this LSO. ALL investigators should follow the guidelines posted on this site.

 VUMC :

  • VU and VUMC submit separately to this LSO. VUMC investigators should follow the guidelines posted on this site. VU investigators should apply through InfoReady and address any questions to VU-LSO@vanderbilt.edu.

FEATURED OPPORTUNITY

  • High-profile or prestigious awards of particular interest to Vanderbilt investigator

Mathers Foundation Grant Program: Summer 2022

Applications due May 16, 2022

VUMC:  These instructions are for VUMC investigators. VU investigators should apply through InfoReady and address any questions to VU-LSO@vanderbilt.edu.

VUMC may submit up to four letters of intent for the summer 2022 cycle of the Mathers Foundation grant program. The mission of The G. Harold and Leila Y. Mathers Foundation is to advance knowledge in the life sciences by sponsoring scientific research that will benefit mankind. The Foundation’s grants program seeks to support innovative, potentially transformative basic science projects in fields including immunology, microbiome, genomics, structural biology, cellular physiology, and neuroscience. The grant duration is three years and requested budgets should be realistic for the project (consider the type of investigation, models used, supply requirements, size of the team, etc.) Indirect costs may not exceed 10%.

Funding Priorities:

  • The Foundation primarily supports basic science, ideally with potential translational applications.
  • Immunology, microbiome, genomics, structural biology, cellular physiology, neuroscience, etc. are noteworthy examples of current research support. Plant Biology and Oceanography research will not be considered for support.
  • Requests for funding previous federally supported research, and/or applications pending federal approval will not be accorded priority consideration.
  • Requests for support of clinical trials or drug discovery will not be approved.
  • Investigations in basic science and translational research may be reliant on collaborative, interdisciplinary projects. Interdisciplinary project proposals may require additional information regarding collaborator(s)’ achievements and relevant expertise.
  • Awards may not be used to purchase capital equipment.
  • LOIs that have been declined should not be resubmitted.
  • Renewal applications for the same or related research will not be accorded priority consideration, and applicants should consider proposing a new research direction.

See the program page for more information.

Internal Application Process:

Anyone interested in being considered as one of VUMC’s nominees must submit the following (in a single PDF) to LSO@vanderbilt.edu by 5 p.m. on May 16:

  1. Brief research plan including summary budget (2 page maximum); 
  1. Include discussion of previous or related work in the field, i.e. put your proposal in context of previous/ongoing efforts from your own group or other investigators. 
  1. Letter of support from department chair/center director; 
  1. Brief CV or NIH Biosketch (5 page maximum)  

Submissions should reference the program name in the subject line of the email.  Any questions about this opportunity or the LSO process may be directed to LSO@vanderbilt.edu.


2023 Macy Faculty Scholars Program

Vanderbilt (VU + VUMC): This is a joint competition for VU and VUMC investigators. All investigators should follow these instructions.

Applications due May 17, 2022

Vanderbilt (VU + VUMC, collaboratively) may nominate one candidate each from the School of Medicine and the School of Nursing for the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation’s Faculty Scholars Program. The goal of this career development award is to identify and nurture promising early career educators in medicine and nursing. While the Program previously supported mid-career Scholars, it now seeks to support more junior faculty who are committed to careers in health professions education.

This award typically provides up to $200,000 of salary support over two years (fringe benefits not included) to pursue a mentored education project, plus up to $50,000 over two years for project support and professional development. Other benefits include mentoring from the advisory committee and program alumni and participation in various Macy meetings, courses, and programs. Indirect costs are not allowed.

The Program aims create an educational system that better meets the health and public health needs of the diverse individuals and communities served throughout the country. Proposed educational projects should explore innovations in health professions education. The Foundation has particular interest in innovative projects that involve the learning environments where clinical care is delivered. Within these clinical learning environments, the Foundation is interested in projects that:

  • Advance equity, diversity, and belonging.
  • Enhance collaboration among health professionals, educators, and learners.
  • Prepare future health professionals to navigate and address ethical dilemmas that arise when the principles of the health professions are in conflict with barriers imposed by the health delivery system.

It is required that projects address one or more of the Foundation’s above priority areas.

Eligibility:

The eligible candidate must:

  • Be a doctorally-prepared faculty member of Vanderbilt’s School of Medicine or School of Nursing.
  • Have served approximately three to eight years as a full-time faculty member
  • Have an institutional commitment for the protection of at least 50% effort for work as a Scholar. (See internal application process.)
  • Have identified a senior faculty member who will serve as a mentor and provide advice on the candidate’s project and career development.
  • Be a US citizen or permanent resident.
  • Projects must address one of the priority areas outlined above.

Internal Application Process:

Anyone interested in being considered as one of Vanderbilt’s nominees must submit the following (in PDF format) to LSO@vanderbilt.edu by 5 p.m. on May 17, 2022

  1. Brief (2 page maximum) description of the educational innovation project;
    1. Must address at least one priority area above.
  2. Statement of support from candidate’s mentor
    1. Must indicate a commitment to advise the candidate on project work and career development.
  3. Brief letter of support from the candidate’s department chair
    1. Must confirm that the candidate will have “at least 50% protected time to pursue a mentored educational project.”
    2. The letter must additionally acknowledge that this grant does not allow indirect costs. This statement can be used/modified within the letter: “The Department recognizes that this grant does not allow indirect costs and will commit to covering any associated indirect costs per applicable school/institutional policy.”
  4. Brief CV (5 page max) or NIH Biosketch

Submissions should reference the program name and applicant’s School (Medicine or Nursing) in the subject line of the email. 

Please contact us at LSO@vanderbilt.edu if you have any questions about the program, foundation, or internal review process.


NSF Research Traineeship (NRT) Program

Applications due May 19, 2022

Vanderbilt (VU + VUMC): This is a joint competition for VU and VUMC investigators. All investigators should follow these instructions

Vanderbilt University may submit only 2 applications (participating either as Lead or non-lead institution) for the NSF Research Traineeship (NRT) Program, which supports the development and implementation of transformative models for STEM graduate education training. The NRT program seeks proposals that explore ways for graduate students in research-based master’s and doctoral degree programs to develop the skills, knowledge, and competencies needed to pursue a range of STEM careers. The program is dedicated to effective training of STEM graduate students in high priority interdisciplinary or convergent research areas, through a comprehensive traineeship model that is innovative, evidence-based, and aligned with changing workforce and research needs.

The NRT Program accepts proposals in any interdisciplinary or convergent research theme of national importance, and encourages specific priority research areas that change periodically. All interdisciplinary or convergent research themes should align with NSF or other national STEM research priority areas and have high potential to develop novel, innovative practices in graduate education. Proposers should describe the importance of the NRT project’s thematic focus to the nation and the particular need to train students for a variety of careers in that thematic area.

Proposals are encouraged in the research areas of Artificial Intelligence (AI), Quantum Information Science and Engineering (QISE) and the following six research areas of NSF's 10 Big Ideas1). Harnessing the Data Revolution (HDR), 2). The Future of Work at the Human-Technology Frontier (HTF), 3). Navigating the New Arctic (NNA), 4). Windows on the Universe: The Era of Multi-Messenger Astrophysics (WOU), 5). The Quantum Leap: Leading the Next Quantum Revolution (QL), and 6). Understanding the Rules of Life: Predicting Phenotype (ROL).

The NRT program addresses both workforce development, emphasizing broad participation, and institutional capacity building needs in graduate education. Strategic collaborations with the private sector, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), government agencies, national laboratories, field stations, teaching and learning centers, informal science centers, and academic partners are encouraged.

Applications should have 1) an interdisciplinary research theme, 2) strong training elements, 3) the integration of the research and training, 4) a clear need for the program, 5) the transformative potential of the research area, and 6) how the project will produce improvements in graduate education and the potential for impact in STEM workforce development.

Award Information

Vanderbilt University is eligible to apply only for Track 1 as a Lead. The maximum funding amount is $3,000,000 over a 5 year period.

See the solicitation for more information.

Internal Application Requirements in InfoReady at this link: https://vanderbilt.infoready4.com/#competitionDetail/1867007  

  1. Please upload a .pdf description of your project (2 pages max) that covers the following:
  • List of partner institutions and key researchers
  • Project Synopsis: a brief summary of the vision and goals of the proposed training program, including a brief description of the interdisciplinary research theme, the main training elements, the integration of the research and training, and the need for the program
  • Statement describing the transformative potential of the research area
  • Statement describing how the project will produce improvements in graduate education and the potential for impact in STEM workforce development
  • Summary budget and project duration (Maximum 5 years)
  1. Biographical Sketch/CV
  2. Letter of Support from Department Chair/Center Director

Any questions about this opportunity or the LSO process may be directed to LSO@vanderbilt.edu.


ADA Pathway to Stop Diabetes (Initiator and Accelerator)

Applications due May 30, 2022

VUMC:  These instructions are for VUMC investigators. VU investigators should apply through InfoReady and address any questions to VU-LSO@vanderbilt.edu.

VUMC may submit 1 nomination to the American Diabetes Association for the Pathway to Stop Diabetes Awards. The single institutional nomination may be for only one of two award types: the Initiator Award for researchers in postdoctoral training OR the Accelerator Award for early-career diabetes investigators.

The Pathway to Stop Diabetes Program intends to attract brilliant scientists at the peak of their creativity to diabetes research, and to accelerate their research progress by providing the necessary resources and support for conducting transformative science.

This call for nominations is prioritizing exceptional investigators that aim to advance existing knowledge and discovery gained from the basic sciences to its eventual translation into patient and population benefit. The ideal applicant will propose innovative translational research that will be an important step towards the eventual goal of improving the lives of people at risk of diabetes or living with the disease - and the pathway to this impact is clear.

The Pathway program seeks to bring new investigators and new perspectives to diabetes research. Supporting scientists with different backgrounds and experience is critical to achieving that objective. Pathway accepts nominations for exceptional investigators with medical and scientific backgrounds who propose innovative basic, clinical, translational, behavioral, epidemiological and health services research relevant to any type of diabetes, diabetes-related disease state or complication, prioritizing translational research that will ‘move the needle’ to improve the lives of people with diabetes.

Nominations are welcomed from all areas of diabetes translational research and span prevention, management and cure of all diabetes types (type 1, type 2 and gestational), diabetes-related disease states (obesity, prediabetes, and other insulin resistant states) and complications. The program intends to attract a broad range of expertise to the field of diabetes from various fields of science and technology, including medicine, biology, chemistry, engineering, mathematics, and physics. In addition, nomination of scientists from diverse backgrounds, including minority groups that are underrepresented in biomedical research, is strongly encouraged.

While most nominees are anticipated to focus on advancing existing discoveries into pre-clinical and early-stage clinical research (‘bench-to-bedside’), ADA strongly encourages innovative later-stage translational research (bedside-to-community) where feasible. Applications focused on a single clinical trial are out of scope.

General Eligibility Criteria:

Only one repeat nomination of an individual applicant will be considered; the same individual may not be nominated a third time.

Initiator Award

The Pathway Initiator award is designed to support early career researchers who have distinguished themselves during their research training as exceptionally talented and promising research investigators with a high likelihood of establishing successful, independent research programs and making seminal contributions in diabetes research. These awards are intended to support particularly innovative and transformational ideas that have the potential to have an exceptional impact in diabetes with an emphasis on the investigator’s potential to significantly transform diabetes through translational research (‘moving the needle’) to improve the lives of people with diabetes. These awards provide salary and research support for applicants during late stages of mentored training through establishment as independent research faculty.

Eligibility:

  • Must currently be in full-time research training position (post-doctoral fellow, research fellowship)
  • Have no more than seven years of research training following terminal doctoral degree
  • Cannot concurrently hold an NIH K99/R00 grant. (All other Career Development awards are allowable unless concurrent awards prohibited by the other granting agency)
  • Must devote at least 75% of their total time and effort to research during the funding period (with 50-100% effort to the ADA project as defined below)
  • At the end of Phase 1 (2 years into award), the investigator needs to have obtained a faculty appointment at an accredited research institution

Maximum Funding: Up to $100,000/year in Phase 1, Up to $325,000/year in Phase 2 for up to 7 years. Maximum combined support for Phase 1 and Phase 2 is $1,625,000.
Support: Project support & PI salary
Indirect Support: Up to 10% of directs in Phase 1, Up to 30% of directs in Phase 2

Project % Effort Required: 75-100% effort to the ADA project in Phase 1, 50-75% effort to the ADA project in Phase 2

Accelerator Award

The Pathway Accelerator award is intended to provide flexible, long-term salary and research support to early career researchers who are proposing innovative and ambitious diabetes-related research programs, and who have distinguished themselves as exceptionally talented and promising research investigators. These awards are intended to support particularly innovative and transformational ideas that have the potential to have an exceptional impact in diabetes with an emphasis on the investigator’s potential to significantly transform diabetes through translational research (‘moving the needle’) to improve the lives of people with diabetes.

Eligibility:

  • Must hold full-time independent faculty position
  • Must have demonstrated independent productivity in diabetes research, including senior author publications
  • May currently hold independent NIH funding (K, U or R awards, including an initial R01/U01) but must not have applied for, or received, an R01/U01 renewal or a second R01/U01 award
  • Must devote at least 75% of their total time and effort to research during the funding period (with 25-50% effort to the ADA project)

Maximum Funding: $325,000/year for up to 5 years, for a total of $1,625,000.
Support: Project support & PI salary
Indirect Support: Up to 30% of directs
Project % Effort Required: 25-50% effort to the ADA project

See the program website for more details.

Internal Application Instructions

Anyone interested in being considered as VUMC’s nominee must submit the following (in a single PDF) to LSO@vanderbilt.edu by 5 p.m. on May 30, 2022.

  • Brief (2-page maximum) research plan, including summary budget
  • NIH Biosketch or 5-page CV
  • Statement of support from department chair/center director

Submissions should reference the name of the award (“ADA Initiator Award” or “ADA Accelerator Award”) in the subject line of the email.

Any questions about this opportunity or the LSO process may be directed to LSO@vanderbilt.edu


NIH Director’s Early Independence Awards (DP5 Clinical Trial Optional)

Applications due June 6, 2022

VUMC: These instructions are for VUMC investigators. VU investigators should apply through InfoReady and address any questions to VU-LSO@vanderbilt.edu.

VUMC may submit two applications to the NIH Director's Early Independence Award.

The NIH Director's Early Independence Award (DP5 Clinical Trial Optional) supports exceptional investigators who wish to pursue independent research essentially after completion of their terminal doctoral/research degree or end of post-graduate clinical training, thereby forgoing the traditional post-doctoral training period and accelerating their entry into an independent research career. For the program to support the best possible researchers and research, applications are sought which reflect the full diversity of the research workforce.

Though most newly graduated doctoral-level researchers would benefit from post-doctoral training, a small number of outstanding junior investigators are capable of launching directly into an independent research career. The Early Independence Award is intended for these select junior investigators who have already established a record of scientific innovation and research productivity and have demonstrated unusual scientific vision and maturity; typical post-doctoral training would unnecessarily delay their entry into independent research. The NIH Director’s Early Independence Award also provides an opportunity for institutions to invigorate their research programs by bringing in fresh scientific perspectives of the awardees they host.

By the end of the award period, the Early Independence Award investigator is expected to be competitive for continued funding of his/her research program through other NIH funding activities and for a permanent research-oriented position.

Eligibility

  • Individuals from diverse backgrounds, including those from underrepresented groups and from the full spectrum of eligible institutions in all geographic locations, are strongly encouraged to apply.
  • Applications in all topics relevant to the broad mission of NIH are welcome, including, but not limited to, topics in the behavioral, social, biomedical, applied, and formal sciences and topics that may involve basic, translational, or clinical research. The NIH Director's Early Independence Award is a component of the High-Risk, High-Reward Research program of the NIH Common Fund.
  • Time window for eligibility: The receipt date of the terminal doctoral degree or end of post-graduate clinical training of the PD/PI must be between June 1, 2021 and September 30, 2023. The degree receipt date is that which appears on the official transcript for the degree. The end of post-graduate clinical training includes residency and fellowship periods.
  • At the time of application, the PD/PI must not have served as a post-doctoral fellow for more than twelve months following a previous, non-terminal doctoral degree before June 1, 2021. . To be consistent with the updated NIH definition of Early Stage Investigators, eligible clinical training includes clinical residency and clinical fellowship.
  • Research independence at time of application: Individuals are eligible only if they, at the time of application submission, do not have research independence. Eligible individuals must have all the following characteristics:
    • The PD/PI's current research agenda is set through concurrence with mentors;
    • The PD/PI's research is funded primarily through support to other investigators (mentored fellowships such as NIH F31 or F32 Fellowships or NSF Graduate Research Fellowships do not preclude eligibility);
    • The PD/PI does not have any space assigned directly by the institution for the conduct of his/her research;
    • The PD/PI, according to institutional policy, cannot apply for an NIH R01 grant without special waiver or exemption from the institution.
  • There is no U.S. citizenship requirement for PDs/PIs.

Level of effort: Individuals must commit at least 9.6 person-months each year (i.e., 80% effort of a 12-month appointment) to the Early Independence Award project in years 1-2 of the project period. In years 3-5, awardees may reduce effort towards the Early Independence Award project but must commit at least 9.6 person-months each year (i.e., 80% effort of a 12-month appointment) to independent research in general.

Budget Info: Awards will be for up to $250,000 direct costs per year for a period of 5 years, plus applicable Facilities and Administrative (F&A) costs.

See the RFA for more information.

Internal Application Process:

Anyone interested in being one of VUMC’s nominees must submit the following (in a single PDF) to LSO@vanderbilt.edu  by June 6, 2022.

  1. Brief (2-page maximum) research plan including summary budget;
    1. Include three sections with the following headings to mirror the specific aims format: "Research Objectives," "Institutional Support," and "Early Independence Rationale."
  2. Statement of support from department chair/center director;
    1. The letter must address requirements for Institutional Resources & Career Development Commitment, specifically: allocated laboratory space, institutional financial commitment to investigator, and plans for mentoring and assuring scientific independence.
  3. NIH Biosketch

Submissions should reference “NIH Director’s Award” in the subject line of the email. Any questions about this opportunity or the LSO process may be directed to LSO@vanderbilt.edu.


W.M. Keck Foundation Research Program- Fall 2022

Applications due June 9, 2022

 VUMC:  These instructions are for VUMC investigators. VU investigators should apply through InfoReady and address any questions to VU-LSO@vanderbilt.edu.

Overview:

VUMC may submit up to two proposals, one in Medical Research and one in Science and Engineering, for the W.M. Keck Foundation Research ProgramWe are currently soliciting concept papers, which will be considered for presentation to the Keck Foundation in summer/fall CY 2022. The goal of the program is to benefit humanity by supporting work that has a distinctive and novel approach, questions a prevailing paradigm, or has the potential to break open new territory in a field. Grants are typically awarded for roughly $1,000,000 and abstracts from previously funded proposals can be found here. Indirect costs are not allowed.

Program Priorities for Funding:

  • Focus on important and emerging areas of research
  • Have the potential to develop breakthrough technologies, instrumentation or methodologies
  • Are innovative, distinctive and interdisciplinary
  • Demonstrate a high level of risk due to unconventional approaches, or by challenging the prevailing paradigm
  • Have the potential for transformative impact, such as the founding of a new field of research, the enabling of observations not previously possible, or the altered perception of a previously intractable problem
  • Does not focus on clinical or translational research, treatment trials or research for the sole purpose of drug development
  • Fall outside the mission of public funding agencies
  • Demonstrate that private philanthropy generally, and the W. M. Keck Foundation in particular, is essential to the project’s success

Internal Application Process:

Anyone interested in being considered as VUMC’s nominee must submit the following (in PDF format) to LSO@vanderbilt.edu by 5 p.m. on June 9, 2022:

  1. 1-page Concept Paper (See guidelines below)
  2. Statement of support from department chair/center director;
    1. Letter must additionally acknowledge that this grant does not allow indirect costs. This statement can be used/modified within the letter: “The Department recognizes that this grant does not allow indirect costs and will commit to covering any associated indirect costs per applicable school/institutional policy.”
  3. NIH Biosketch

Concept Paper Requirements:

  • Must be single page with 12 point font and 1 inch margins
  • Must indicate the area of emphasis for the project – “medical research” or “science and engineering research”
  • Include an overview of the proposed project emphasizing any unique aspects and pilot studies. Emphasize attributes that address program priorities, e.g. high level of risk, transformative impact.
  • Include a description of the methodologies and key personnel
  • Include a brief justification of the need for Keck support. Competitive proposals will provide evidence that proposed research is a poor fit for federal funding opportunities, i.e. reviewer comments or program officer discussion.
  • Include an estimated budget broken down, if possible, by major areas, e.g., personnel, equipment, consumable supplies, etc. (budgets can be rough approximations at this stage)

Any questions about this opportunity or the LSO process may be directed to LSO@vanderbilt.edu.


 

 

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Active Calls for NON-Limited External Opportunities 

Internal review process NOT required- Submit directly to Sponsor

The VUMC Corporate & Foundation Relations team provides hands-on proposal development assistance for non-federal awards. Contact cfr@vumc.org for more information.


Maximizing Investigators' Research Award (R35)

Applications due May 17
https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-19-367.html
The Maximizing Investigators' Research Award (MIRA) provides support for an investigator’s ambitious program of NIGMS-related research. The MIRA provides freedom to explore new avenues of inquiry that arise during the course of research, as long as it remains within the mission of NIGMS. The overall goal of MIRA is to increase the efficiency and efficacy of NIGMS funding. Specific MIRA benefits include:
•    A longer grant period - five-year awards rather than the current NIGMS median of 4 years;
•    More flexibility to pursue new ideas and opportunities as they arise during the course of research because the award is not tied to specific aims or predicated on completing specific, pre-defined projects;
•    Increased stability of funding through longer-term commitments of support, improved success rates, and more graduated, rather than all-or-none, funding decisions for R35 renewals;
•    A reduction in administrative burden associated with managing multiple grants;
•    A reduction in required application writing.
This FOA allows both new applications from eligible NIGMS-funded investigators and renewal applications from current established and early-stage MIRA grantees. 


Chan Zuckerberg Initiative – Science Diversity Leadership Award

Applications due May 19

Science Diversity Leadership awards from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI) will recognize the leadership and scientific accomplishments of outstanding early- to mid-career researchers at U.S. universities, medical schools, or nonprofit research institutes who — through their outreach, mentoring, teaching, and leadership — have a record of promoting diversity, equity, and inclusion in their scientific fields. They will have made significant research contributions to the biomedical sciences, show promise for continuing scientific achievement, and demonstrate leadership in efforts to diversify the sciences. Principal Investigators and laboratory staff who are leading projects supported by these grants will participate in annual in-person meetings and online webinars organized by CZI and will be connected to national and international scientific leaders through CZI convenings.

Eligibility:

The Principal Investigator must be someone who:

  1. Performs research relevant to the biomedical sciences and holds an M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., M.D./Ph.D., DDM, DVM, or equivalent degree;
  2. Leads an independent research laboratory — defined as having control of its budget, grants, and space — in a university, medical school, or nonprofit research institution in the U.S. or a U.S. territory; and
  3. Started their first independent laboratory no earlier than January 1, 2012.

Principal Investigators who identify as members of underrepresented racial and ethnic groups, who have disabilities that limit major life activities, or who identify as women or non-binary gender are strongly encouraged to apply

Grant funds and project periods:

$1.15M total costs will be disbursed over a five-year period ($230,000 total costs per year, inclusive of 15% for indirect costs/overhead) to the institution that employs the PI who leads the project. Direct costs ($200,000 per year) can be used to support both the research of the PI and their outreach, mentoring, and teaching activities.

Read more about the application process and prioritized research fields here.


NCCN, Pfizer and EMD Serono Quality of Care Initiative to Improve the Treatment of Advanced or Metastatic Bladder Cancer Patients

Letters of Intent due May 26

National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) is pleased to announce a collaboration with Pfizer Global Medical Grants (GMG) and EMD Serono to offer a new grant opportunity to support Quality Improvement projects that will advance the quality of care, including guideline concordant care, and best practices around treatment for patients with Metastatic or Advanced Bladder Cancers.

The intent of the RFP is to encourage NCCN Member Institutions and non-NCCN Member Institutions to submit letters of intent (LOIs) describing concepts and ideas around how to improve the quality of care, including guideline concordant care, and best practices around treatment for patients with Metastatic or Advanced Bladder Cancers.

NCCN views this collaboration with Pfizer and EMD Serono as clear recognition of the advantages offered to investigators from NCCN member institutions through the NCCN Oncology Research Program. 

The intent is to fund individual projects capped at $300,000 (direct and indirect costs) although smaller, lower-costs projects are encouraged. Funding greater than $300,000 will be considered for exceptional proposals with detailed budget justification.

Letters of Intent must be submitted by 5:00 pm ET on Thursday, May 26, 2022. Please direct questions regarding this RFP to Nicole Zion at zion@nccn.org with the subject line, “NCCN Pfizer EMD Serono Bladder Cancer Quality Initiative.”


Robert Wood Johnson Foundation - Research in Transforming Health and Healthcare Systems

Brief Phase I proposals due June 24

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is committed to building a Culture of Health that provides everyone in America a fair and just opportunity for health and well-being. Since 2017, the Foundation’s Research in Transforming Health and Healthcare Systems (RTHS) program, managed by AcademyHealth, has helped advance this vision by supporting rigorous, empirical studies that help policymakers, practitioners, stakeholders, and others understand the effects of current or potential policies to transform health and healthcare systems. In recent years, the RTHS program has strengthened its commitment to advancing racial equity by prioritizing the perspectives of community members and other impacted stakeholders in funded research.

The purpose of the 2022 RTHS call for proposals is to support policy-relevant, community-engaged research that helps improve the affordability of care for communities most impacted by structural racism, inequities, and discrimination. We seek proposals for research and policy analysis projects that examine the design, implementation, and/or impact of local, state, and/or national policies related to the affordability of high-quality, equitable care. Studies may include people’s ability to: afford health insurance; pay for healthcare services (even with insurance); pay for transportation; child care; and other services that in turn affect access to medical care. The projects’ goals are to generate timely and useful information for use by policymakers and other decision-makers.

Proposals should focus on a historically marginalized racial or ethnic group; people with disabilities; immigrants; people from the LGBTQ+ community; or another community that has historically faced systemic and persistent barriers to good health. We especially welcome proposals that consider intersecting identities across race, gender, sexual orientation, disability status, and other dimensions. In consideration of our commitment to community-engaged research, people from the community of focus must have a leadership role in the design, conduct, and dissemination of the proposed research or analysis.

Consistent with our Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Commitment, we particularly encourage applicants with project directors or team members from backgrounds historically underrepresented in research disciplines as a result of their race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, disability, or other factors.

Learn more at: https://www.rwjf.org/en/library/funding-opportunities/2022/research-in-…


The Michelson Prizes: Next Generation Grants

Applications due June 26

The Michelson Prizes: Next Generation Grants are given annually to support promising researchers who are applying disruptive concepts and inventive processes to advance human immunology, vaccine discovery and immunotherapy research for major global diseases.

The 2022 Michelson Prizes are looking for research proposals in Human Immunology and Vaccine Research. The committee will be looking for research aimed at tackling the current roadblocks that exist in human vaccine development and expanding our limited understanding of key immune processes that are fundamental to successful vaccine and immunotherapy development. The committee will be looking for research that is highly innovative and impactful, with the potential to be applied across many diseases.

While the Michelson Prizes are focused on research in the fields of immunology, vaccine and immunotherapy discovery, applicants from the full spectrum of related disciplines, including clinical research, biochemistry, molecular biology, protein engineering, computer science, artificial intelligence/machine learning, biophysics, nanotechnology, etc., are encouraged to apply.

Applicants must be 35 or younger at the time of submission. Early career independent investigators, postdoctoral fellows, clinical fellows (including residents and interns), and other researchers currently in training positions are eligible for these awards. 


NIH Director’s New Innovator Award Program (DP2)

Applications due August 19
https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-22-019.html 
The NIH Director’s New Innovator Award Program supports early stage investigators with the potential to strongly impact areas relevant to NIH’s mission. Part of the High-Risk, High-Reward Research program, the award supports exceptionally creative early career investigators who propose innovative, high-impact projects in the biomedical, behavioral or social sciences. Key points include: 
•    Single PI only
•    Must have Early Stage Investigator status (completed doctoral degree or postgraduate clinical training within last 10 years and never received a substantial NIH independent research award)
•    No preliminary data required
•    Minimum of 25% research effort
•    $1.5 million in direct costs split into two multi-year segments
For the program to support the best possible researchers and research, applications are sought which reflect the full diversity of the research workforce. Individuals from diverse backgrounds are strongly encouraged to apply. In addition, applications in all topics relevant to the broad mission of NIH are welcome, including, but not limited to, topics in the behavioral, social, biomedical, applied, and formal sciences and topics that may involve basic, translational, or clinical research. 


NIH Director’s Transformative Research Awards (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

Applications due September 1

The NIH Director’s Transformative Research Award Program supports individual scientists or groups of scientists proposing groundbreaking, exceptionally innovative, original, and/or unconventional research with the potential to create new scientific paradigms, establish entirely new and improved clinical approaches, or develop transformative technologies. For the program to support the best possible researchers and research, applications are sought which reflect the full diversity of the nation’s research workforce. Individuals from diverse backgrounds, including those from underrepresented groups (see, Notice of NIH's Interest in Diversity, NOT-OD-20-031) are strongly encouraged to apply to this Funding Opportunity Announcement. In addition, applications are welcome from the full spectrum of eligible institutions in all geographic locations and in all topic areas relevant to the broad mission of NIH, including, but not limited to, behavioral, social, biomedical, applied, and formal sciences and topics that may involve basic, translational, or clinical research. No preliminary data are required. Projects must clearly demonstrate, based on the strength of the logic, a compelling potential to produce a major impact in a broad area of relevance to the NIH. The NIH Director’s Transformative Research Award is a component of the High-Risk, High-Reward Research (HRHR) Program of the NIH Common Fund.

Towards the objective of funding the best possible science, the Office of Strategic Coordination and the Center for Scientific Review are piloting a process for initial peer review of applications received in response to this FOA in which the identity of the investigators and institutions are withheld until the last phase of review. Instructions for anonymizing components of the application are given in Section IV and must be carefully followed. A description of the review process is given in Section V.

Application budgets are not limited but must be commensurate with the scope of the proposed research. The maximum project period is five years.


National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Instrumentation Program (S10 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

Letter of Intent due September 7

Please note that this is separate from the annual ORIP S10 Program that requires institutional coordination. Email amy.f.martinez@vumc.org with any questions.

The NIMH Instrumentation Program encourages applications from NIH funded investigators to purchase or upgrade a single commercially available instrument or to purchase a group of components to create an instrument that is not commercially available. The goal of the NIMH Instrumentation Program is to make such instruments available to either individual laboratories or core facilities that conduct mental health-related research. Examples of instruments that might be submitted under this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) include light microscopes, electron microscopes, spectrophotometers, and biomedical imagers. 

Background

Modern mental health-related research can require expensive instruments that are often hard to obtain through traditional funding mechanisms. The goal of the NIMH Instrumentation Program is to make such instruments available to either individual laboratories or core facilities that conduct mental health-related research. These instruments can be commercial instruments or collections of components that others have already described how to assemble into a working instrument. Upgrades of existing instruments can also be requested.

Investigators can propose instruments that will be used by their laboratory or by a collection of investigators. Investigators who are proposing to provide the instrument only to members of their laboratory must state why the instrument cannot be shared. In either case, investigators are strongly encouraged to house the requested instrument in a core facility or other shared facility to ensure that the new instrument remains functional and available to the research community over its useful lifetime.

Research Objectives

Types of instruments that might be appropriate for the NIMH Instrumentation Program include light microscopes, electron microscopes, spectrophotometers, and biomedical imagers. This list is representative and not exhaustive. Foreign-made instruments are allowed. A single application cannot request multiple unrelated instruments. In such cases, multiple applications can be submitted.

The goal of this FOA is to provide instruments to collect data rather than components for further instrument/technology development. Instrument development applications should be submitted to other FOAs on which NIMH participates or to appropriate BRAIN Initiative FOAs.

Non-Responsive Applications

The NIMH Instrumentation Program will not support requests for:

  • Purely instructional equipment
  • Instruments used for billable clinical care
  • Institutional administrative management systems
  • Stand-alone computer systems or software (Computers and software that are a component of an instrument, for example for an MRI console are responsive. An application containing only a stand alone computer systems or software is not responsive.)
  • General purpose equipment, an assortment of instruments to furnish a research facility, or equipment for routine sustaining infrastructure (such as autoclaves, hoods, cages for animal facilities, standard machine shop equipment)
  • Equipment or components that are part of an effort to develop new instruments rather than to collect data
  • Multiple unrelated instruments or components. Note: in such cases, multiple applications can be submitted.

Award Budget

Applications will be accepted with an award budget between $200,000 and $600,000. There is no maximum limit on the cost of the instrument, but the maximum award is $600,000. S10 awards are only for the cost of the instrument, so indirect costs cannot be requested.


NIH Director’s Pioneer Award Program (DP1)

Applications due September 9

The NIH Director’s Pioneer Award Program supports individual scientists of exceptional creativity who propose highly innovative research projects with the potential to produce a major impact on broad, important areas relevant to the mission of NIH. In the Pioneer Award program, emphases are on the qualities of the investigator, the innovativeness, and potential impact of the proposed research. Key points include: 
•    Single PI only
•    No preliminary data or detailed experimental plans required
•    The proposed research must reflect substantially different ideas from those being pursued in the investigator's current research program or elsewhere. It cannot be an obvious extension or scale-up of a current research enterprise.
•    Minimum of 51% research effort for first three years of the project period. May reduce effort to minimum of 33% and 25% in the fourth and fifth years, respectively.
•    Awards will be for $700,000 in direct costs per year for the project period limited to five years.

For the program to support the best possible researchers and research, applications are sought which reflect the full diversity of the research workforce. Individuals from diverse backgrounds are strongly encouraged to apply. In addition, applications in all topics relevant to the broad mission of NIH are welcome, including, but not limited to, topics in the behavioral, social, biomedical, applied, and formal sciences and topics that may involve basic, translational, or clinical research. 


Maximizing Investigators' Research Award for Early Stage Investigators (R35)

Applications due October 3

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-20-117.html

The Maximizing Investigators’ Research Award for Early Stage Investigators (ESI MIRA) supports an ambitious program of NIGMS-related research in an early stage investigator's laboratory. The overall goal of MIRA is to increase the efficiency and efficacy of NIGMS funding. Specific MIRA benefits include:

  • No requirement or expectation for preliminary data, which will

    • Enable investigators to apply earlier in their independent research career, allowing them to secure grant funding that will launch and sustain a successful research career, and

    • Enhance investigators’ ability to move into research areas that are distinct from those of their postdoctoral mentors, which could increases chances for new scientific discoveries;

  • Increased stability of funding for NIGMS-supported ESIs, improved success rates, and more graduated, rather than all-or-none, funding decisions for MIRA renewals;

  • Larger award amount than the current average NIGMS R01 award to ESIs, while the project period will be similar;

  • More flexibility to pursue new ideas and opportunities as they arise during the course of research because the award is not tied to specific aims;

  • A reduction in administrative burden associated with managing multiple grants; and

  • A reduction in required application writing.

The ESI MIRA program encourages eligible applicants to submit an ESI MIRA application early in their independent research careers and to move into research areas that are distinct from those of their postdoctoral mentors. Applicants who have not yet received independent research funding are encouraged to apply, as are those who have not had sufficient time and/or resources to generate independent senior author publications.