• Catherine Bush

    Speech Language Pathologist

    Over the past 17 years as a Speech Language Pathologist, Catherine has primarily worked with young children in early intervention and in clinical research settings. Originally from Cookeville, TN, her Bachelor’s degree is in Music Therapy, and she earned her Master’s degree in Speech Language Pathology from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Catherine’s most recent research endeavors were dedicated to coaching parents of baby siblings with Autism Spectrum Disorder to support their engagement and communication. She is excited to return to her musical roots and to more formally study the connections between the brain, music, and language. Outside the lab, Catherine enjoys hiking, planting flowers, and spending time with her awesome nephews! 

  • Olivia Boorom, CCC-SLP

    Speech-Language Pathologist-2
    Hearing and Speech Sciences

    Olivia Boorom graduated in 2018 from East Carolina University where she received her M.S. in Communication Sciences and Disorders, and she is thrilled to have completed her clinical fellowship as a speech-language pathologist. Her primary area of interest is emergent language and social communication in children on the autism spectrum, and she completed a master’s thesis related to emergent literacy skills in preschoolers with autism. In 2016, she received her B.A. in Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and is a Tar Heel born and bred. In her free time, she loves hiking and (attempting to) cook.

  • Talia Liu

    Research Analyst
    Otolaryngology

    Talia Liu is originally from Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, right outside of Philadelphia. In 2018, she graduated from Rice University in Houston, Texas where she majored in both Cognitive Sciences and Psychology. Her research has focused on language development in preschoolers with autism spectrum disorder, infant language development, and speech perception. She enjoys working with infants and children, as well as with individuals with autism. She looks forward to pursuing her MS in Speech-Language Pathology at Vanderbilt while continuing to work part-time in the lab. In her free time, Talia likes to play her instruments (mainly piano and oboe), and eat pizza, soup noodles, and dumplings.

     

  • Meredith Watson

    Research Analyst
    Otolaryngology

    Meredith Watson graduated in 2018 with a B.S. in Brain and Cognitive Sciences and B.A. in Linguistics from the University of Rochester in upstate New York. She was also born and raised in Rochester, so she’s excited to finally live somewhere warm. At UofR, she worked for Dr. Loisa Bennetto in the Developmental Neuropsychology lab where she studied neurocognitive and communication deficits in autism. Her main research interest is the linguistic development of children on the autism spectrum. When she’s not in the lab, she enjoys acting, singing, dancing, and crafting.

  • Youjia Wang

    Research Analyst
    Otolaryngology

    Youjia Wang graduated from Vanderbilt with a major in neuroscience and a minor in music. His prior research has focused on examining how the rhythms and timings present in social interactions can entrain attention. Currently, he is working under Dr. Gordon on projects related to the genetic and neurologic basis of rhythm and grammar skills. He hopes to continue to medical school in Fall 2020, but does not yet know what kind of specialty he is interested in. In his free time, Youjia is involved in club water polo and plays flute for the Vanderbilt Commodore Orchestra.

     
  • Alyssa Scartozzi

    Research Analyst
    Otolaryngology

    Alyssa Scartozzi is from Long Island, New York. She graduated from Muhlenberg College with Honors in Psychology and double minors in Music and Chemistry. Her previous research focused on the influence of movement synchrony and asynchrony and singing synchrony and asynchrony on perceived social bonding, the effects of gesture on foreign language word recall, and inducing nonphotochemical nucleation of supersaturated solutions of glycine. Alyssa had completed her honors thesis on the combined effects of groove, high exertion and low exertion synchrony and asynchrony on perceived social bonding. She hopes to pursue a graduate degree in Neuroscience. In her free time, Alyssa enjoys playing her instruments, going on hikes, and practicing yoga. 

  • Peyton Coleman

    Research Analyst
    Otolaryngology

    Peyton Coleman grew up in Cary, North Carolina. She graduated summa cum laude in 2020 from Temple University with a B.S. in Neuroscience and a minor in Music. She began her education in Music Therapy and completed internships working with clients with dementia, cognitive disabilities, and psychiatric illnesses before switching to neuroscience. Her previous research focused on pitch mismatch negativity and auditory figure-ground segregation, as well as some experience in gene therapy development for ALS. Her honors thesis explored the neurobiological effects of music exposure during the perinatal period, and focused on BDNF, endorphins, and prenatal development of the auditory system. She will attend Vanderbilt University’s Neuroscience Graduate Program starting in the fall of 2021. In her free time, Peyton loves to embroider, play piano, and bake delicious treats.