Animal Allergy Questionnaire

Occupational Health Clinic
September 29, 2011

People who work with animals have an occupational risk of allergies, which can lead to occupational asthma. To prevent asthma, it is important to find individuals who are starting to have allergy symptoms when they work with animals. By identifying these people and helping protect them with a special respirator, we can reduce their exposure to animal allergens and reduce their risk of asthma.

Simian Herpes B

Occupational Health Clinic
September 27, 2011

Herpes B (also known as Macacine herpesvirus 1 or Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1) is a virus carried by certain monkeys called macaques. When the monkey gets herpes B virus, it makes a blister on or near the monkey's lips. After the blister heals, the virus hides inside the monkey and you would not know the monkey has had the virus. The virus may be in its mouth, hands or other body parts. When a monkey bites, scratches, or spits on a worker, the virus may pass to that worker. Herpes B virus does not make monkeys very sick but can make people very sick and even cause death.

Animal Allergies

Occupational Health Clinic
September 27, 2011

Animal users who have asthma or allergic conditions may become sensitive to animal allergens with repeated exposure. Up to 20% of allergic animal users may develop occupational asthma, which can limit the ability to work and may lead to permanent disability. An allergy is the over-reaction response of your immune system to substances in the environment. These substances are called allergens and can cause sneezing, watery and itchy eyes, itchy skin, sinus or nasal congestion or more serious reactions. When we touch or work around animals, we expose our bodies to these allergens.