VIGH study seeks to expand epilepsy care efforts in Africa

Holly Fletcher
October 14, 2019

The Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health, with Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, will conduct a 60-site cluster randomized clinical trial in three cities in northern Nigeria to determine the efficacy of shifting childhood epilepsy care to epilepsy-trained community health extension workers with a five-year $5.9 million federal grant, “Bridging the Childhood Epilepsy Treatment Gap in Africa (BRIDGE),” from National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke of the National Institutes of Health. Edwin Trevathan, M.D., M.P.H., Amos Christie Chair in Global Health, Professor of Pediatrics and

Science and PBS report on three places where "ending AIDS" is a distant hope

In 2016, Nigeria accounted for 37,000 of the world's 160,000 new cases of babies born with HIV. The most populous country in Africa, Nigeria does have an exceptionally large HIV-infected population of 3.2 million people. In other countries, however, rates of mother-to-child transmission of HIV have plummeted, even in far poorer countries. Mother-to-child transmission is only one part of Nigeria’s HIV epidemic.

VIGH Hosts Program for Strengthening Clinical Trial Regulation Capacity

June 7, 2018

This week, VIGH hosted visitors from Nigeria's National Agency for Food and Drug Administration Control (NAFDAC) and the National Agency for the Control of AIDS (NACA) to attend the VIGH Transdisciplinary Program for Strengthening Clinical Trial Regulation Capacity. The goal of this program was to build capacity of NAFDAC and NACA staff for clinical trial regulation and oversight of clinical trial protocols. NAFDAC, Nigeria's local equivalent of the U.S.

VIGH researchers receive grant to study family-focused approach to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission

Researchers at the Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health (VIGH) recently received a two-year, $895,072 grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study whether an integrated, family-focused approach can prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV—the AIDS virus—in Nigeria.