VUMC and VIGH Investigators Present Findings on Elevated Mortality of Tuberculosis Diagnosis in People Living with HIV

March 18, 2019

"Among people with HIV in Latin America, those diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB) at an initial clinic visit were about twice as likely to die within 10 years as people not initially diagnosed with TB, according to findings from a large observational study. This increased risk persisted despite the availability of TB treatment and mirrored patterns seen previously in HIV-negative populations, according to research supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health.

Featured Publication: Attrition of HIV-exposed infants from early infant diagnosis services in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis

November 30, 2018

Research led by Vanderbilt investigators found nearly 40% of HIV-exposed infants in low‐ and middle‐income countries (LMIC) were not in care at 18 months of age or had died. Despite the availability and progress of HIV prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) programs which includes postpartum follow-up of HIV-positive mothers and their HIV-exposed infants, many infants do not remain engaged in early infant diagnosis (EID) services that are essential to optimal health outcomes.

Featured Publication: Prevailing Gender Norms and Unanticipated Effects of a Sexual and Reproductive Health Intervention

November 30, 2018

Programs and interventions focused on reducing the risk of HIV and early pregnancy, improving school attendance, and empowering girls can have significant and powerful effects for adolescent girls. Simultaneously, these programs may have unanticipated effects that inhibit the program's success.

HIV-positive pregnant women at significant risk of loss to follow up from HIV Care after delivery in South Africa

September 18, 2018

In 2017, according to UNAIDS, more than 90% of HIV-positive pregnant women accessed antiretroviral (ART) medicines to prevent mother-to child transmission of HIV in Southern Africa, and recent research suggests access and adherence to ART remains high during pregnancy due in part to the scale up of national antenatal (ANC) and ART care clinics.  Engagement in HIV care after delivery, however, can be challenging.

Science and PBS report on three places where "ending AIDS" is a distant hope

In 2016, Nigeria accounted for 37,000 of the world's 160,000 new cases of babies born with HIV. The most populous country in Africa, Nigeria does have an exceptionally large HIV-infected population of 3.2 million people. In other countries, however, rates of mother-to-child transmission of HIV have plummeted, even in far poorer countries. Mother-to-child transmission is only one part of Nigeria’s HIV epidemic.

Calling for improved HIV data systems on World AIDS Day

December 18, 2017

On World AIDS Day, The Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, published a blog post by Kate Clouse, Ph.D., MPH, VIGH core faculty. She calls for improved HIV data systems to provide quality care and ensure lifelong engagement in HIV care.

Researchers study unique couples intervention in Mozambique to reduce HIV transmission

Researchers in the Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health are testing whether a unique “couples-centered” intervention developed in the southern African nation of Mozambique can reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

Nutrition Research Methods Workshop Trains Faculty and Graduate Students in Zambia

Current and past fellows, and faculty of the UNZA-Vanderbilt Training Partnership for HIV-Nutrition Research (UVP). The program is supported by the Fogarty International Center.