Managing Chemical Waste

Introduction

Vanderbilt University is required to comply with sewer disposal restrictions established by the Metro wastewater treatment plant and all applicable State and Federal regulations. This guide is designed to assist laboratories with the identification of waste streams that are prohibited or limited from sink/sewer disposal. Wastes must NOT be intentionally diluted to comply with sink/sewer disposal requirements. Please note that application of some regulatory requirements to laboratory waste streams is extremely complicated. Contact the Vanderbilt Environmental Health and Safety Department (VEHS) for assistance in applying these guidelines to your specific waste streams. For more information on how to collect and manage hazardous wastes, contact VEHS.

Wastes forbidden from sink/sewer disposal

The following wastes must NEVER be discharged to the sanitary sewer in ANY concentration. These wastes must be collected and managed as hazardous waste.

  1. Raw Chemical Waste. 
     Unused, pure, or concentrated chemicals.
  2. Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Waste. 
    Chlorinated hydrocarbons are compounds that contain chlorine, hydrogen, and carbon. Examples of chlorinated hydrocarbons include but are not limited to:
    1. Chloromethanes: 
      Specific examples:
      • Methylene chloride
      • Trichloromethane (chloroform)
      • Trichlorofluoromethane
    2. Chloroethanes: 
      Specific examples:
      • 1,1-Dichloroethane
      • 1,1,1-Trichloroethane
      • 1,1,2-Trichloroethane
      • Hexachloroethane
    3. Chloroethylenes: 
      Specific examples:
      • Vinyl chloride
      • Trichloroethylene
      • Tetrachloroethylene
    4. Chloropropanes, chlorobutanes, chlorobutenes: 
      Specific examples:
      • Dichlorobutadiene
      • Hexachlorobutadiene
    5. Chlorinated paraffins;
    6. Chlorinated pesticides 
      Specific examples:
      • Aldrin
      • Heptachlor epoxide
      • Chlordane
      • Hexachloride
      • DDT
      • Hexachlorobenzene
      • 2,4-D
      • Lindane
      • Dieldrin
      • Methoxychlor
      • Endrin
      • Mirex
      • Heptachlor
      • Toxaphene
    7. Nucleus-chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons 
      Specific examples:
      • Dichlorobenzene
      • Dichlorotoluene
      • Chlorobenzene
      • 1,2-Dichlorobenzene
      • 1,4-Dichlorobenzene
      • Chlorinated biphenyls (including PCBs)
      • Chlorinated naphthalenes
      • Pentachlorophenol
      • 2,4,5-Trichlorophenol
      • 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol
    8. Side-chain chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons 
      Specific examples:
      • Chloromethyl benzene (benzyl chloride)
      • Dichloromethyl benzene (benzal chloride)
      • Trichloromethyl benzene (benzotrichloride).
  3. Chlorofluorcarbon Waste
  4. Brominated Hydrocarbon Waste 
    Specific examples:
    • Bromoform
    • Bromomethane
  5. Cyanide Waste. 
     Includes cyanide, cyanate (OCN-), and thiocyanate (SCN-) compounds.
    Specific examples:
    • Potassium cyanide
    • Sodium cyanide
    • Hydrogen cyanide
    • Zinc cyanide
    • Copper cyanide
    • Nickel cyanide.
  6. Heavy Metal Waste. 
    Specific examples:
    • Antimony
    • Mercury
    • Arsenic
    • Nickel
    • Barium
    • Selenium
    • Cadmium
    • Silver
    • Chromium
    • Thallium
    • Copper
    • Zinc
    • Lead
  7. Corrosive Waste. 
     Corrosive wastes are wastes that could cause corrosive structural damage to the sink/sewer piping. All wastes with a pH lower than 5.0 Standard Units (S.U.) or higher than 9.0 S.U. are considered corrosive wastes. Laboratories must not neutralize corrosive wastes to comply with this requirement unless it is part of a written protocol for the laboratory process generating the waste and the neutralization process is carried out by trained, qualified personnel.
  8. Solvent Waste. 
    Wastes containing any of the following solvents in any concentration:
    • Acetone
      Please note that acetone used to wash glassware falls into this category.
    • Ethyl Ether
    • Benzene
    • Isobutanol
    • n-Butyl Alcohol
    • Methanol
    • Carbon Disulfide
    • Methyl Ethyl Ketone (MEK)
    • Carbon Tetrachloride
    • Methyl Isobutyl Ketone
    • Cresols
    • Nitrobenzene
    • Cyclohexanone
    • 2-Nitropropane
    • Cresylic Acid
    • Pyridine
    • 2-Ethoxyethanol
    • Toluene
    • Ethyl Acetate
    • Xylene
    • Ethyl Benzene
  9. Oil and Grease Wastes. 
     Waste oils and grease, including vacuum pump oil, must be collected and managed as hazardous wastes. Wastes that are contaminated with oil or grease in concentrations greater than 50 mg/L must also be collected and managed as hazardous waste.
  10. Ignitable Wastes. 
     Ignitable wastes are: 1) Liquid wastes with a flashpoint less than 60 degrees C (140 degrees F); 2) Non-liquid wastes that are capable of causing fire through friction, reaction with moisture, or spontaneous chemical changes; 3) Ignitable compressed gases; or 4) Oxidizers. Ignitable wastes include most waste solvents found in laboratories, ignitable compressed gases such as hydrogen, and oxidizers such as nitrates/nitrites (sodium nitrate, potassium nitrite, etc.) and chlorates and perchlorates (magnesium perchlorate, etc.). Ignitable wastes include mixtures of ignitable chemicals with other materials if the mixture still exhibits the ignitability characteristic (i.e., flashpoint less than 60 degrees C).
  11. Reactive Wastes. 
     Reactive wastes: 1) Are normally unstable and readily undergo violent change; 2) React violently or form explosive mixtures with water; 3) Can generate toxic gases, vapors or fumes when mixed with water or exposed to extreme pH conditions; or 4) Are capable of detonation or explosive reaction under certain conditions. Common reactive wastes found in laboratories include certain cyanides, sulfides, and silanes or any mixtures of multiple wastes that exhibit reactivity characteristics.
  12. Solid or Viscous Wastes. 
     Solid or viscous wastes that may coat, clog, or otherwise cause obstruction to the flow of sewer pipes must never be discharged to the sewer. Examples of prohibited solid or viscous waste include sand, animal tissues, bones, plastics, rubber, glass, wood chips, wood shavings, plaster, paint, etc. in such quantity, concentration, or form that may cause interference with proper sewer flow. Depending on the nature of the waste, it may be discharged to the normal trash or collected and managed as hazardous waste.
  13. Nuisance Waste. 
     Wastes that may cause a discoloration or that may cause interference in the Metro wastewater treatment plant must not be discharged to the sewer. Wastes that are noxious or malodorous to the extent that a nuisance may be created at the Metro wastewater treatment plant or in other laboratories must not be discharged to the sewer.
  14. Untreatable Waste. 
     Wastes that contain any element or compound that cannot be adequately treated or removed by the Metro wastewater treatment plant (biological activated sludge treatment) and that is known to be an environmental hazard must not be discharged to the sewer.
  15. Hot Liquid or Vapor Wastes. 
     Liquid or vapor wastes with a temperature above 65.5 oC (150 oF) must not be discharged to the sewer.
  16. Ethidium Bromide and Acrylamide Waste. 
     Buffer solutions and other solutions containing ethidium bromide or acrylamide in any concentration and ethidium bromide and acrylamide gels.
  17. Priority Pollutant Wastes. 
    All wastes containing any of the following priority pollutant compounds in any concentration must be collected and managed as hazardous waste:
    1. Volatiles
      Acrylonitrile Benzene Bromoform
      Carbon tetrachloride Chlorobenzene Chlorodibromomethane
      Chloroethane 2-Chloroethylvinyl ether Chloroform
      Dichlorobromomethane Dichlorodifluoromethane 1,1-Dichloroethane
      1,2-Dichloroethane 1,1-Dichloroethylene Dichloromethane
      1,2-Dichloropropane 1,2-Dichloropropylene 1,3-Dichloropropylene
      2,4-Dichloropropylene Ethylbenzene Methyl bromide
      Methyl chloride Methylene chloride 1,1,2,1-Tetrachloroethane
      1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane Tetrachloroethylene Tetrachloromethane
      Toluene Trans-dichloroethylene 1,2-Trans-dichloroethylene
      1,1,1-Trichloroethane 1,1,2-Trichloroethane Trichloroethylene
      Trichlorofluoromethane Trichloromethane Vinyl chloride
    2. Base/Neutral
      Acenaphthene Acenaphthylene Anthracene
      Benzidine Benzo(a)anthracene Benzo(a)pyrene
      3,4-Benzofluoranthene Benzo(ghi)perylene Benzo(b)fluoranthene
      Benzo(k)fluoranthene Bis(2-chloroethoxy)methane Bis(2-chloroethyl)ether
      Bis(2-chloroisopropyl)ether Bis(2-chloromethyl)ether Bis (2-ethylhexyl)phthalate
      4-Bromophenyl phenyl ether Butylbenzyl phthalate 2-Chloronaphthalene
      4-Chlorophenyl phenyl ether Chrysene Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene
      1,2-Dichlorobenzene 1,3-Dichlorobenzene 1,4-Dichlorobenzene
      3,3'-Dichlorobenzidine Di-n-ethyl phthalate Diethyl phthalate
      Di-c-methyl phthalate Dimethyl phthalate Di-n-butyl phthalate
      2,4-Dinitrotoluene 2,6-Dinitrotoluene Di-n-octyl phthalate
      1,2-Diphenylhydrazine Fluroranthene Fluorene
      Hexachlorobenzene Hexachlorobutadiene Hexachlorocyclopentadiene
      Hexachloroethane Indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene Naphthalene
      Nitrobenzene N-nitrosodimethylamine N-nitrosodi-n-propylamine
      N-nitrosodiphenylamine Phenanthrene Pyrene
      1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene    
    3. Pesticides
      Acrolein Aldrin BHC, alpha
      BHC, beta BHC, delta BHC, gamma
      Chlordane 4,4'-DDT 4,4'-DDE
      4,4'-DDD Dieldrin Endosulfan, alpha
      Endosulfan, beta Endosulfan sulfate Endrin
      Endrin aldehyde Heptachlor Heptachlor epoxide
      Isophorone PCB-1016 PCB-1221
      PCB-1232 PCB-1242 PCB-1248
      PCB-1254 PCB-1260 TCDD (Dioxin)
      Toxaphene    
    4. Inorganics, Metals, Phenols, and Cresols
      Antimony Arsenic Asbestos
      Beryllium Cadmium Chromium
      Copper Lead Mercury
      Nickel Selenium Silver
      Thallium Zinc Cyanide
      2-Chlorophenol Cresols 2,4-Dichlorophenol
      2,4-Dimethylphenol 4,6-Dinitro-o-cresol 2,4-Dinitrophenol
      2-Nitrophenol 4-Nitrophenol P-chloro-m-cresol
      Pentachlorophenol Phenols 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol
  18. Rinseate
    Empty containers that are being rinsed should be triple rinsed with a minimal amount of liquid and the rinseate collected and managed as hazardous waste, if the container held any of the wastes described above in Sections 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, or 8. Subsequent rinses may be discharged to the sewer. Depending on the waste, fewer rinses may be required to be collected. Contact VEHS for evaluation of specific waste containers. Rinseate from empty containers that held other types of waste may be discharged to the sewer if the rinseate does not exhibit the hazardous characteristic of the waste (for example, rinseate from a container that held ignitable waste may be sewer disposed if the rinseate is not ignitable).

Wastes with limited sink/sewer disposal

  1. Radioactive Wastes.
    A radioactive waste that is water soluble or readily dispersible in water and not prohibited from sewer disposal based on the criteria described in the previous section may be disposed via the sanitary sewer system. The disposal limit is 200 μCi per laboratory per day. Records of sewer disposal must be maintained on the Radioactive Sink Disposal Log.
  2. Biological Materials.
    Biological waste must not be discharged to the sewer unless it has been properly treated. Please refer to Proper Disposal of Biological Waste in the Guide to Biosafety at Vanderbilt for biological waste disposal policies and procedures (VEHS website). Biological waste intended for sewer disposal must not be prohibited from sewer disposal based on the criteria described in the previous section.
  3. Specific Organic Chemicals in Concentrations of One Percent or Less.
    Organic chemicals suitable for sink/sewer disposal are described below. Only those organic compounds that are reasonably soluble in water are suitable for sink/sewer disposal. A compound is considered water soluble if it dissolves to the extent of at least three percent. Chemicals listed below must be in concentrations of approximately one percent or less to be suitable for sink/sewer disposal. If the total volume of waste to be disposed is greater than four liters per day, approval by VEHS is required. Sewer discharges of these chemicals must not be prohibited in the previous section. Any chemicals that fall into categories described below but are specifically prohibited from sink/sewer disposal in the previous section must NOT be discharged to the sewer.
    1. Alkanols with 4 or fewer carbon atoms. 
      Specific examples:
      • 2-Butanol
      • 2-Propanol
      • Tert-butanol
      • Ethanol 1-Propanol
    2. Alkanediols with 7 or fewer carbon atoms. 
      Specific examples:
      • Butanediol and isomers
      • Butylene glycol
      • Ethylene glycol
      • Heptamethylene glycol
      • Heptanediol and isomers
      • Hexanediol and isomers
      • Hexylene glycol
      • Pentanediol and isomers
      • Pentylene glycol
      • Propylene glycol
    3. Sugars and sugar alcohols (polyols). 
      Specific examples:
      • Dithioerythritol
      • Dithiothreitol
      • Erythritol
      • Glycerol
      • Lactitol
      • Maltitol
      • Mannitol
      • Molasses
      • Sorbitol
      • Xylitol
    4. Alkoxyalkanols with 6 or fewer carbon atoms. 
      Specific examples:
      • Butoxyethanol
      • Ethoxyethanol
      • Methoxyethanol
    5. Aliphatic aldehydes with 4 or fewer carbon atoms.
      Specific examples:
      • Acetaldehyde
      • Butyraldehyde (butanal)
      • Formaldehyde
      • Glutaraldehyde
      • Isobutyraldehyde
      • Propionaldehyde (propanal)
    6. RCONH2 and RCONHR with 4 or fewer carbon atoms and RCONR2 with 10 or fewer carbon atoms.
      Specific examples:
      • Acetamide
      • Butanamide
      • Butyramide
      • Formamide
      • Isobutyramide
      • N,N-Diethyl formamide
      • N,N-Dimethyl acetamide
      • N,N-Dimethyl propionamide
      • N-Ethyl acetamide
      • N-Ethyl formamide
      • N-Methyl acetamide
      • N-Methyl formamide
      • N-Methyl propionamide
      • Propionamide
    7. Aliphatic amines with 6 or fewer carbon atoms.
      Specific examples:
      • Amylamine
      • Isobutylamine
      • Butylamine
      • Dimethylpropylamine
      • Ethylamine
      • 1-Ethylpropylamine
      • Hexylamine
      • Isobutylamine
      • Isopropylamine
      • Methylamine
      • Methylbutylamine
      • N-Ethylbutylamine
      • N-Ethylmethylamine
      • N-Methylpropylamine
      • Trimethylamine
      • Iso-amylamine
      • Diethylamine
    8. Aliphatic diamines with 6 or fewer carbon atoms.
      Specific examples:
      • Ethylene diamine
      • Hexamethylene diamine and isomers
      • Pentamethylenediamine and isomers
      • Piperazine
      • 1,2-Propanediamine
      • 1,3-Propanediamine
      • Triethylenediamine
    9. Alkanoic acids with 5 or fewer carbon atoms and the ammonium, sodium, and potassium salts of these acids with 20 or fewer carbon atoms.
      Specific examples:
      • Acetic acid
      • Butyric acid
      • Formic acid
      • Isobutyric acid
      • Isovaleric acid
      • Propionic acid
      • Valeric acid
    10. Alkanedioic acids with 5 or fewer carbon atoms and the ammonium, sodium, and potassium salts of these acids with 20 or fewer carbon atoms. 
      Specific examples:
      • Fumaric acid
      • Glutaric acid (1,5-pentanedioic acid)
      • Malic acid
      • Malonic acid (1,3-propanedioic acid)
      • Oxalic acid (1,2-ethanedioic acid)
      • Succinic acid (1,4-butanedioic acid)
      • Tartaric acid
    11. Hydroxyalkanoic acids with 5 or fewer carbon atoms and the ammonium, sodium, and potassium salts of these acids with 20 or fewer carbon atoms
      Specific examples:
      • Glycolic acid
      • 3-Hydroxybutyric acid
      • 2-Hydroxyisobutyric acid
      • Lactic acid (2-hydroxypropanoic acid)
    12. Aminoalkanoic acids with 6 or fewer carbon atoms and the ammonium, sodium, and potassium salts of these acids with 20 or fewer carbon atoms
      Specific examples:
      • 3-Amino butyric acid
      • 4-Amino butyric acid
      • Amino isobutyric acid
      • 5-Amino pentanoic acid and isomers
      • 3-Amino propanoic acid
    13. Esters with 4 or fewer carbon atoms. 
      Specific examples:
      • Ethyl formate
      • Isopropyl acetate
      • Isopropyl formate
      • Methyl acetate
      • Methyl formate
      • Methyl propionate
      • Propyl formate
    14. Nitriles
      Specific examples:
      • Acetonitrile
      • Butyronitrile
      • Isobutylnitrile
      • Propionitrile
    15. Sulfonic acids and sodium and potassium salts of the acids. 
      Specific examples:
      • Methane sulfonic acid
      • Ethane sulfonic acid
      • 1-Propane sulfonic acid
      • 1-Butane sulfonic acid
      • 1-Pentane sulfonic acid
      • 1-Hexane sulfonic acid
      • 1-Heptane sulfonic acid
      • 1-Octane sulfonic acid
      • 1-Decane sulfonic acid
      • 1-Dodecane sulfonic acid
      • 1-Tetradecane sulfonic acid
      • 1-Hexadecane sulfonic acid
  4. Specific Inorganic Chemicals in Concentrations of One Percent or Less.
    Inorganic chemicals suitable for sink/sewer disposal are described below. Only those inorganic compounds that are reasonably soluble in water are suitable for sink/sewer disposal. A compound is considered water soluble if it dissolves to the extent of at least three percent. Chemicals listed below must be in concentrations of approximately one percent or less to be suitable for sink/sewer disposal. If the total volume of waste to be disposed is greater than four liters per day, approval by VEHS is required. Sewer discharges of these chemicals must not be prohibited in the previous section. Any chemicals that fall into categories described below but are specifically prohibited from sink/sewer disposal in the previous section must NOT be discharged to the sewer.

    Inorganic salts cations and anions:

    Cations Anions
    Aluminum, Al3+ Borate, BO33-, B4O72-
    Ammonium, NH4+ Bromide, Br-
    Calcium, Ca2+ Carbonate, CO32-
    Cesium, Cs+ Chloride, Cl-
    Hydrogen, H+ Bisulfite, HSO3-
    Lithium, Li+ Hydroxide, OH-
    Magnesium, Mg2+ Oxide, O2-
    Potassium, K+ Iodide, I-
    Sodium, Na+ Nitrate, NO3-
    Strontium, Sr2+ Phosphate, PO43-
    Tin, Sn2+ Sulfate, SO42-
    Titanium, Ti3+, Ti4+
    Zirconium, Zr2+

References

  1. Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 0400-12-01.
  2. Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County Code of Laws Title 15.60.
  3. Prudent Practices for Handling Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories, National Academy Press, Washington, D.C., 1981.
  4. Prudent Practices for Disposal of Chemicals from Laboratories, National Academy Press, Washington, D.C., 1983.
  5. Prudent Practices in the Laboratory: Handling and Disposal of Chemicals , National Academy Press, Washington, D.C., 1995.

Summary of specific chemicals forbidden from sewer disposal

The following chemicals must not be discharged to the sanitary sewer in any concentration. This list contains examples of specific chemicals and does NOT include all chemicals that are forbidden from sewer disposal. For more information on whether a chemical not listed below can be discharged to the sewer, refer to the detailed sections in this guide or contact VEHS.

Acenaphthene Acenaphthylene
Acetone Acrolein
Acrylamide Acrylonitrile
Aldrin Anthracene
Antimony Arsenic
Asbestos Barium
Benzene Benzidine
Benzo(a)anthracene Benzo(a)pyrene
Benzo(b)fluoranthene Benzo(ghi)perylene
3,4-Benzofluoranthene Benzo(k)fluoranthene
Beryllium BHC, alpha
BHC, beta BHC, delta
BHC, gamma Bis (2-ethylhexyl)phthalate
Bis(2-chloroethoxy)methane Bis(2-chloroethyl)ether
Bis(2-chloroisopropyl)ether Bis(2-chloromethyl)ether
Bromoform Bromoform
Bromomethane 4-Bromophenyl phenyl ether
Butylbenzyl phthalate Cadmium
Carbon Disulfide Carbon Tetrachloride
Chlordane 2-Chloroethylvinyl ether
Chlorinated biphenyls (including PCBs) Chlorinated naphthalenes
Chlorobenzene Chlorodibromomethane
Chloroethane Chloroform
Chloromethyl benzene (benzyl chloride) 2-Chloronaphthalene
2-Chlorophenol 4-Chlorophenyl phenyl ether
Chromium Chrysene
Copper Copper cyanide
Cresols Cresylic Acid
Cyanide Cyclohexanone
2,4-D DDT
4,4'-DDD 4,4'-DDE
4,4'-DDT Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene
Dichlorobenzene 1,2-Dichlorobenzene
1,3-Dichlorobenzene 1,4-Dichlorobenzene
3,3'-Dichlorobenzidine Dichlorobromomethane
Dichlorobutadiene Dichlorodifluoromethane
1,1-Dichloroethane 1,2-Dichloroethane
1,1-Dichloroethylene 1,2-Trans-dichloroethylene
Dichloromethane Dichloromethyl benzene (benzal chloride)
2,4-Dichlorophenol 1,2-Dichloropropane
1,2-Dichloropropylene 1,3-Dichloropropylene
2,4-Dichloropropylene Dichlorotoluene
Di-c-methyl phthalate Dieldrin
Diethyl phthalate 2,4-Dimethylphenol
Dimethyl phthalate 2,4-Dinitrophenol
Di-n-butyl phthalate Di-n-ethyl phthalate
Di-n-octyl phthalate 4,6-Dinitro-o-cresol
2,6-Dinitrotoluene 1,2-Diphenylhydrazine
Endosulfan sulfate Endosulfan, alpha
Endosulfan, beta Endrin
Endrin aldehyde Ethidium Bromide
2-Ethoxyethanol Ethyl Acetate
Ethyl Benzene Ethyl Ether
Ethylbenzene Fluorene
Fluroranthene Heptachlor
Heptachlor epoxide Hexachloride
Hexachlorobenzene Hexachlorobutadiene
Hexachlorocyclopentadiene Hexachloroethane
Hydrogen cyanide Indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene
Isobutanol Isophorone
Lead Lindane
Mercury Methanol
Methoxychlor Methyl bromide
Methyl chloride Methyl Ethyl Ketone (MEK)
Methyl Isobutyl Ketone Methylene chloride
Mirex Naphthalene
n-Butyl Alcohol Nickel
Nickel cyanide Nitrobenzene
2-Nitrophenol 4-Nitrophenol
2-Nitropropane N-nitrosodimethylamine
N-nitrosodi-n-propylamine N-nitrosodiphenylamine
PCB-1016 PCB-1221
PCB-1232 PCB-1242
PCB-1248 PCB-1254
PCB-1260 P-chloro-m-cresol
Pentachlorophenol Phenanthrene
Phenols Potassium cyanide
Pyrene Pyridine
Selenium Silver
Sodium cyanide TCDD (Dioxin)
1,1,2,1-Tetrachloroethane 1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
Tetrachloroethylene Tetrachloromethane
Thallium Toluene
Toxaphene Trans-dichloroethylene
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene 1,1,1-Trichloroethane
1,1,2-Trichloroethane Trichloroethylene
Trichlorofluoromethane Trichloromethane (chloroform)
Trichloromethyl benzene (benzotrichloride) 2,4,5-Trichlorophenol
2,4,6-Trichlorophenol Vinyl chloride
Xylene Zinc
Zinc cyanide  

Summary of specific chemicals with limited sewer disposal

The following chemicals may be discharged to the sewer in concentrations of approximately one percent or less. If the percentage is greater than one percent, approval by VEHS is required. If the total volume of waste to be disposed is greater than four liters per day, approval by VEHS is required. Sewer discharges of these chemicals must not be prohibited for any other reason. Specifically, solutions containing these chemicals must not also contain chemicals specifically forbidden from sewer disposal. This list contains examples of specific chemicals and does NOT include all chemicals with limited discharge to the sewer. For more information on whether a chemical not listed below can be discharged to the sewer, refer to the detailed sections in this guide or contact VEHS.

Acetaldehyde Acetamide
Acetic acid Acetonitrile
3-Amino butyric acid 4-Amino butyric acid
Amino isobutyric acid 5-Amino pentanoic acid and isomers
3-Amino propanoic acid Amylamine
Butanamide Butanediol and isomers
1-Butane sulfonic acid 2-Butanol
Butoxyethanol Butylamine
Butylene glycol Butyraldehyde (butanal)
Butyramide Butyric acid
Butyronitrile 1-Decane sulfonic acid
Diethylamine Dimethylpropylamine
Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) Dithioerythritol
Dithiothreitol 1-Dodecane sulfonic acid
Erythritol Ethane sulfonic acid
Ethanol Ethoxyethanol
Ethyl formate Ethylamine
Ethylene diamine Ethylene glycol
1-Ethylpropylamine Formaldehyde
Formamide Formic acid
Fumaric acid Glutaraldehyde
Glutaric acid (1,5-pentanedioic acid) Glycerol
Glycolic acid Heptamethylene glycol
Heptanediol and isomers 1-Heptane sulfonic acid
1-Hexadecane sulfonic acid Hexamethylene diamine and isomers
1-Hexane sulfonic acid Hexanediol and isomers
Hexylamine Hexylene glycol
3-Hydroxybutyric acid 2-Hydroxyisobutyric acid
Iso-amylamine Isobutylamine
Isobutylamine Isobutylnitrilev
Isobutyraldehyde Isobutyramide
Isobutyric acid Isopropyl acetate
Isopropyl formate Isopropylamine
Isovaleric acid Lactic acid (2-hydroxypropanoic acid)
Lactitol Malic acid
Malonic acid (1,3-propanedioic acid) Maltitol
Mannitol Methane sulfonic acid
Methoxyethanol Methyl acetate
Methyl formate Methyl propionate
Methylamine Methylbutylamine
Molasses N,N-Diethyl formamide
N,N-Dimethyl acetamide N,N-Dimethyl propionamide
N-Ethyl acetamide N-Ethyl formamide
N-Ethylbutylamine N-Ethylmethylaminevv
N-Methyl acetamide N-Methyl formamide
N-Methyl propionamide N-Methylpropylamine
1-Octane sulfonic acid Oxalic acid (1,2-ethanedioic acid)
Pentamethylenediamine and isomers Pentanediol and isomers
1-Pentane sulfonic acid Pentylene glycol
Piperazine 1,2-Propanediamine
1,3-Propanediamine 1-Propane sulfonic acid
1-Propanol 2-Propanol
Propionaldehyde (propanal) Propionamide
Propionic acid Propionitrile
Propyl formate Propylene glycol
Sorbitol Succinic acid (1,4-butanedioic acid)
Tartaric acid Tert-butanol
1-Tetradecane sulfonic acid Triethylenediamine
Trimethylamine Valeric acid
Xylitol