Keeping You Safe At Work https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/ en SHARE Presentation Videos https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/resource-articles/share-presentation-videos <span class="field--node--title">SHARE Presentation Videos</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=155" hreflang="und">Work/Life Connections</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=139" hreflang="und">Resource Articles</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=172" hreflang="und">Keeping You Safe At Work</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 07/23/2020 - 15:27</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3274" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to SHARE Presentation Videos"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Work/Life Connections</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" style="text-align: center;"><span><img alt="SHARE Center" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/default/files/public_files/images/wlc/wlcShareLogo.jpg" /><span title="Click and drag to resize">​</span></span></p> <p>Join SHARE Center Specialist Lauren Dattilo for a presentation on what sexual harassment is, ways bystanders can help when they witness harassment, and what steps VUMC is taking to create a safer and more equitable workplace.</p> <p><strong>Equitable and empowered environments: Addressing workplace sexual harassment at VUMC</strong><br /> <a href="https://bit.ly/VUMCSHAREv1" target="_blank" title="View">View</a> the video here (9m 30s)</p> <p>For more information on the SHARE Center, visit our <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/share-center" title="website">website.</a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=200" hreflang="und">Counseling</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=230" hreflang="und">Mental Health</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=234" hreflang="und">Personal Safety</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=261" hreflang="und">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Thu, 23 Jul 2020 20:27:21 +0000 harnessg 3274 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Exposure to Pertussis https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/exposure-pertussis <span class="field--node--title">Exposure to Pertussis</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/news?cat=172" hreflang="und">Keeping You Safe At Work</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?cat=138" hreflang="und">Occupational Health Clinic</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?cat=139" hreflang="und">Resource Articles</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 03/29/2012 - 12:24</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/2337" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Exposure to Pertussis"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Occupational Health Clinic</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>What is pertussis and how is it spread?</strong><br /> Pertussis is a bacterial infection of the respiratory tract which generally begins with mild upper respiratory symptoms and can progress to severe attacks of coughing (paroxysmal stage), often with a characteristic inspiratory whoop. It is caused by <em>Bordetella pertussis</em>. Transmission occurs by close contact with respiratory secretions from an infected person.</p> <p><strong>What is considered to be exposed to pertussis?</strong><br /> A person is considered to be exposed if there is inhalation of droplets and discharges from the respiratory tract of an infected person. Persons who wore a mask for all contacts with the patient are not exposed. Patients are most contagious during the early stage of the disease, before the onset of the cough.</p> <p><strong>What should I do if I am exposed?</strong><br /> If you are exposed to someone with pertussis, you should be evaluated to see of chemoprophylaxis would be right for you.</p> <p><strong>What is chemoprophylaxis?</strong><br /> Chemoprophylaxis is antibiotic therapy given to prevent infection and secondary spread of the disease. Chemoprophylaxis should be given as soon as possible after exposure, preferably within 24 hours. It is recommended for household and other close contacts. There are several options for adults with pertussis exposures: antibiotics will be chosen based on the exposed person's medical history and the current CDC guidelines.</p> <p><strong>What is the incubation period?</strong><br /> The incubation period (the time between exposure to infection and the appearance of the first symptom) is 6-20 days, usually 7-10 days.</p> <p><strong>What if I decide not to take chemoprophylaxis?</strong><br /> Chemoprophylaxis is optional, but if you develop a runny nose, nasal congestion, sore throat, or cough within two weeks of the exposure, you should see a health care provider. Prompt initiation of antibiotic therapy decreases infectivity and may shorten the course of the illness.</p> <p><strong>What if my exposure occurs at work?</strong><br /> In the event of an exposure within the Medical Center, Infection Control will notify the VOHC that an exposure has occurred. VOHC compiles the list of exposed persons. The VOHC will then contact the faculty/staff members to discuss chemoprophylaxis. Your manager will need to complete a Tennessee First Report of Work Injury and forward this to the Office of Risk Management (Room 610 Oxford House, phone 936-0660). You may fill out the Tennessee First Report of Illness form online by accessing from Veritas. You should keep your receipts for any medical treatment that you receive as a result of this exposure and submit them to Risk Management for possible reimbursement.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/news?tag=213" hreflang="und">Exposure Management</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?tag=260" hreflang="und">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?tag=261" hreflang="und">VUMC</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?tag=267" hreflang="und">Work Injury/Illness Care</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Thu, 29 Mar 2012 17:24:27 +0000 admin 2337 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Working with Radioactive Iodine https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/working-radioactive-iodine <span class="field--node--title">Working with Radioactive Iodine</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/news?cat=172" hreflang="und">Keeping You Safe At Work</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?cat=138" hreflang="und">Occupational Health Clinic</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?cat=139" hreflang="und">Resource Articles</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 09/27/2011 - 22:18</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/2181" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Working with Radioactive Iodine"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item"> Occupational Health Clinic</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>When patients are treated with radioactive iodine, their blood and body fluids such as urine and vomit can contain the radioactive drug. Caregivers should understand the risks of exposure. There are two different types of radiation risks:</p> <ul> <li>Thyroid exposure: Having the radioactive iodine absorbed by your thyroid gland.</li> <li>External beam radiation: Getting radiation exposure from the contaminated body fluids, just like you would from an X-ray.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Preventing thyroid exposure</strong></p> <p>If taken internally through the mouth, skin or lungs, radioactive iodine can be absorbed by the thyroid gland, leading to an increased risk of hypothyroidism and benign (non-cancerous) thyroid adenomas (growths.) Radioactive iodine does not cause hyperthyroidism, goiter, Grave's disease or thyroid cancer.</p> <p>The healthcare worker can prevent thyroid uptake of radioactive iodine by wearing personal protective equipment, and by using safe practices to keep from accidentally getting the patient's blood or body fluids in their mouth, nose, or on their skin. Safe practices are:</p> <ul> <li>Wear a gown and gloves when caring for the patient.</li> <li>If there is a risk of splash, wear a mask with eye protection.</li> <li>Do not take your own food or drink into the patient's room.</li> </ul> <p>Exposure is limited by controlling who can go into a patient's room and by ensuring that caregivers wear the appropriate protective gear.</p> <p>In the past, Vanderbilt performed bioassays on all nurses who cared for patients on radioactive iodine. Program results showed no significant exposures occurring, so mandatory testing was discontinued. Though discontinued, this testing is still available for caregivers who have had an exposure incident. Testing is administered by Vanderbilt's Environmental Health and Safety Department.</p> <p><strong>Preventing external beam radiation exposure</strong></p> <p>Like all radioactive materials, radioactive iodine emits external beam radiation. We all get some radiation exposure daily from the sun and appliances used around the house.</p> <p>The medical risk of overexposure to external beam radiation includes acute radiation sickness (for massive overexposures) and malignancies (primarily leukemia and other hematologic malignancies) from chronic overexposure.</p> <p>Since the patient is ingesting the full radioactive dose, they have much more risk than the healthcare worker. Researchers have studied these patients to learn their risks after treatment. There is no increase in the incidence of leukemia or cancer and no increase in overall cancer mortality.</p> <p>Most radioactivity is concentrated in the patient's body fluids. To limit healthcare worker exposure to radiation, the patient's body fluids are contained and covered to contain radiation. Staff must wear their gown and gloves when handling body secretions.</p> <p>The amount of radiation exposure is measured with dosimeter badges. OHC recommends that caregivers wear their badges whenever caring for a radioactive iodine or brachytherapy patient, and remember to turn their badge in for exposure level measurement.</p> <p>Keywords: radiation, radioactive iodine, radioiodine, I-131, thyroid</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/news?tag=213" hreflang="und">Exposure Management</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?tag=261" hreflang="und">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Wed, 28 Sep 2011 03:18:49 +0000 admin 2181 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Working With Formaldehyde https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/working-formaldehyde <span class="field--node--title">Working With Formaldehyde</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/news?cat=172" hreflang="und">Keeping You Safe At Work</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?cat=138" hreflang="und">Occupational Health Clinic</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?cat=139" hreflang="und">Resource Articles</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 09/27/2011 - 22:18</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/2180" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Working With Formaldehyde"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Occupational Health Clinic</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Formaldehyde is a chemical used in embalming and tissue preservation, as well as in cold sterilization. Acute exposure to formaldehyde may result in pulmonary edema (fluid in the lungs), central nervous system (CNS) depression, or pneumonitis (inflammation of the lung tissue). Chronic exposure may cause irritation of the skin, mucous membranes or respiratory tract. Repeated exposure to formaldehyde may result in an allergic response. It is also a potential carcinogen. Primary exposure routes are inhalation and skin absorption.</p>&#13; &#13; <p>The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has determined levels above which medical surveillance must be offered. Faculty and staff who are potentially exposed to formaldehyde at or above these levels must undergo annual medical surveillance which includes a medical questionnaire to review medical history and risk factors that might make someone more susceptible to the effects of formaldehyde. An annual physical examination and basic spirometry (breathing test) are also performed.</p>&#13; &#13; <p>Employees with acute exposure to formaldehyde should be seen immediately in OHC or, after-hours, in the Emergency Department.</p>&#13; &#13; <h3 class="ms-standardheader">Additional information:</h3>&#13; &#13; <p><a href="http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS&amp;p_id=10075" target="_blank" title="OSHA Formaldehyde Standard">OSHA Formaldehyde Standard</a></p>&#13; &#13; <p><a href="http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxfaqs/tf.asp?id=219&amp;tid=39" target="_blank" title="Formaldehyde FAQs">Formaldehyde FAQs</a></p>&#13; &#13; <p><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/vanderbilt-surveillance-program-screening-requirements" title="Vanderbilt Surveillance Program Screening Requirements">Vanderbilt Surveillance Program Screening Requirements</a></p>&#13; &#13; <p>Keywords: formaldehyde, physicals, OSHA</p>&#13; </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/news?tag=213" hreflang="und">Exposure Management</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?tag=261" hreflang="und">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Wed, 28 Sep 2011 03:18:49 +0000 admin 2180 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Working with Animals https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/working-animals <span class="field--node--title">Working with Animals</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/news?cat=172" hreflang="und">Keeping You Safe At Work</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?cat=138" hreflang="und">Occupational Health Clinic</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?cat=139" hreflang="und">Resource Articles</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 09/27/2011 - 22:18</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/2179" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Working with Animals"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Occupational Health Clinic</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><img alt="" class="alignright size-medium wp-image-2164" src="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/images/ohc/ohcWorkingwithAnimals.jpg" style="width: 232px; height: 300px; margin: 5px; float: right;" title="Working with Animals" /></p>&#13; &#13; <p>Working with animals exposes animal handlers and researchers to some unique occupational hazards. Some animals, such as sheep and monkeys, can carry diseases that can be transmitted to humans. Researchers working with mice or other rodents have up to a 20% chance of developing allergies to these animals; and 20% of those who are allergic can develop occupational asthma.</p>&#13; &#13; <p>The Department of Animal Care requires all workers who handle animals to undergo an <a href="https://redcap.vanderbilt.edu/surveys/index.php?s=WLFEYH7NJT" target="_blank" title="annual allergy assessment">annual allergy assessment</a> and education about allergies to animals. The questionnaire also asks about the species of animal that the worker handles. The questionnaire may be accessed from our website, or it can be filled out at the time of the Animal Care Exam. Those reporting frequent allergy symptoms will be contacted by OHC to schedule a clinic visit where we will evaluate the need for a respirator, and can help the individual obtain treatment if needed. Those reporting exposure to animals that carry diseases will also be contacted to schedule an appointment for a physical or appropriate immunizations (see special physicals, below.) Alternately, if you would like to opt out of the annual allergy assessment, an <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/ohcAnimalAllergenDeclinationStatement.pdf" target="_blank" title="Animal Allergen Declination Statement">Animal Allergen Declination Statement</a> form must be downloaded, signed, and faxed to OHC at 936-0966.</p>&#13; &#13; <p>People who work with animals or animal tissue that can carry zoonotic diseases are required to be screened in person by Occupational Health. At Vanderbilt, these animals are primarily macaque monkeys (simian herpes B virus,) sheep (Q-fever) and various species at risk for rabies (dog, opossum, raccoon.) At these annual physicals, we evaluate the individual health risks that can make someone more susceptible to these diseases, counsel the individual about ways to further reduce their risk, and review the importance of reporting potential exposures.</p>&#13; &#13; <p>For more information on the Animal Care Occupational Health and Safety Program, contact us at 936-0955.</p>&#13; &#13; <p>Keywords: allergy, allergies, asthma, animals, screening, survey, OSHA, AAALAC</p>&#13; &#13; <h3>Additional Information:</h3>&#13; &#13; <p><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/ohcAnimalAllergenDeclinationStatement.pdf" target="_blank" title="Animal Allergen Declination Statement">Animal Allergen Declination Statement</a></p>&#13; </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/news?tag=185" hreflang="und">Animal Care Program</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?tag=213" hreflang="und">Exposure Management</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?tag=244" hreflang="und">Screening Exams</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?tag=260" hreflang="und">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?tag=261" hreflang="und">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Wed, 28 Sep 2011 03:18:49 +0000 admin 2179 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Working While Pregnant https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/working-while-pregnant <span class="field--node--title">Working While Pregnant</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/news?cat=172" hreflang="und">Keeping You Safe At Work</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?cat=138" hreflang="und">Occupational Health Clinic</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?cat=139" hreflang="und">Resource Articles</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 09/27/2011 - 22:18</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/2178" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Working While Pregnant"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Occupational Health Clinic</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><img align="right" alt="" class="alignright size-full wp-image-891" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/images/ohc/ohcWorkingWhilePregnant.jpg" style="width: 245px; height: 246px; margin: 5px;" title="Pregnant woman at work on phone" /></p> <p>Occupational Health, Vanderbilt Environmental Health and Safety (VEHS) and Vanderbilt Infection Control and Prevention have safeguards in place to help you protect your unborn baby while you work at Vanderbilt.</p> <p>When you learn of your pregnancy, you are not required to tell anyone until you are ready to request medical leave. Pregnant faculty and staff may obtain a confidential consultation in Occupational Health to discuss any concerns they may have. We will help you understand any health risks in your work area and the protections available to you.</p> <p>While most women may continue working as usual throughout their pregnancy, there are specific hazards to consider:</p> <p><strong>Radiation- </strong>The radiation safety policy offers enhanced monitoring of pregnant workers. Pregnant radiation workers may complete and submit a HIPAA-compliant <a href="https://redcap.vanderbilt.edu/surveys/?s=F4DLWR9LHK" target="_blank" title="Declaration of Pregnancy">Declaration of Pregnancy</a> survey to Occupational Health and VEHS. If you work with radiation and you declare your pregnancy, the radiation safety professionals at VEHS will help you protect your baby by limiting your exposure.</p> <p><strong>Parvovirus B19 (Fifth Disease) – </strong>The CDC does not recommend that pregnant women be excluded from a workplace where a Fifth disease outbreak is occurring. If you are exposed to Parvovirus B19 while pregnant, a blood test is available to determine if you have immunity.</p> <p><strong>Cytomegalovirus (CMV) </strong>- The CDC does not recommend excluding pregnant health care workers from caring for patients with known CMV infection. Spread of CMV requires direct contact with virus-containing secretions. Hand washing and using gloves are excellent ways to prevent infection. If you are exposed to CMV while pregnant, a blood test is available to determine if you have immunity.</p> <p><strong>Toxoplasmosis</strong>- Toxoplasmosis is an infection sometimes carried by cats and shed in their stool. Transmission occurs with exposure to germs released from the dried feces. Infection during pregnancy poses additional risks to the fetus. However, many adults have immunity to toxoplasmosis and cannot obtain the infection again. To prevent infection, never let cat feces sit more than 24 hours before scooping the litter. Always wear gloves and wash your hands after litter changes. Pregnant animal caretakers who work with cats may have an immunity test done at OHC; those who are not immune may request reassignment from caring for cats.</p> <p><strong>Inhalation agents and cytotoxic medications-</strong>The inhaled medications ribavirin and pentamadine, and all chemotherapy medications, pose additional risks to pregnant women. Under VUMC policies, pregnant caregivers may request reassignment rather than administer or handle these medications. However, reassignment is not mandatory, because use of the recommended protective equipment and specific administration and handling protocols does provide adequate protection from these risks, even for pregnant workers.</p> <p>All safety programs at Vanderbilt have policies and protective equipment designed to protect all workers, whether pregnant, immunosuppressed, or otherwise vulnerable. However, individuals with specific concerns are always welcome to contact OHC to discuss their questions with an Occupational Health clinician.</p> <p><strong>Waste Anesthesia Gases</strong> - Halogenated inhalational anesthesia gases, such as isoflurane and sevoflurane, pose a theoretical risk of spontaneous abortion and fetal malformations.  While much of the data comes from studies on older gases (such as halothane) that are not used anymore, and animal studies on newer gases have not found any adverse effects on fertility or fetal development, the risk of spontaneous abortion with high exposures cannot be discounted. Use of these agents in combination with nitrous oxide may increase the risk.  When working around these gases, limit exposure by using equipment controls and work practices, such as:</p> <ul> <li>Use the WAG scavenging system and have it inspected regularly</li> <li>Achieve good face seal during inductions</li> <li>Turn off gas when not in use, if possible, to avoid excess gas flow</li> <li>Maintain gas source away from your personal breathing zone</li> <li>Ensure that air exchange in rooms is adequate</li> <li>Use a double-mask for gas-induced child anesthesia</li> </ul> <h3 class="ms-standardheader">Additional information:</h3> <p><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/resource-articles-blog/exposure-resistant-bacteria-pregnancy" title="Exposure to Resistant Bacteria in Pregnancy">Exposure to Resistant Bacteria in Pregnancy</a></p> <p><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/resource-articles-blog/exposure-hazardous-chemicals-pregnancy" title="Exposure to Hazardous Chemicals in Pregnancy">Exposure to Hazardous Chemicals in Pregnancy</a></p> <p><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/rsv-exposure-pregnancy" title="RSV Exposure in Pregnancy">RSV Exposure in Pregnancy</a></p> <p><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/radiation-exposure-pregnancy" title="Radiation Exposure in Pregnancy">Radiation Exposure in Pregnancy</a></p> <p><a href="https://www.vumc.org/safety/rad" target="_blank" title="Radiation Safety">Radiation Safety</a></p> <p><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/parvovirus-b19-exposure-pregnancy" title="Parvovirus B19 Exposure in Pregnancy">Parvovirus B19 Exposure in Pregnancy</a></p> <p><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/resource-articles-blog/cmv-exposure-pregnancy" title="CMV Exposure in Pregnancy">CMV Exposure in Pregnancy</a></p> <p><a href="https://www.vumc.org/safety/rad/declared-pregnant-worker" target="_blank" title="VEHS Declared Pregnant Worker">VEHS Declared Pregnant Worker</a></p> <p><a href="https://redcap.vanderbilt.edu/surveys/?s=F4DLWR9LHK" target="_blank" title="Declaration of Pregnancy Survey">Declaration of Pregnancy Survey</a></p> <p><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/babies-and-you" title="Babies and You">Babies and You</a> Prenatal Education Program</p> <p><a href="https://www.vanderbilt.edu/child-family-center/" target="_blank" title="VU Child Care Program">VU Child Care Program</a></p> <p><a href="https://hr.vumc.org/cfc" target="_blank" title="VUMC Child Care Program">VUMC Child Care Program</a></p> <p><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/resource-articles-blog/babys-best-start" target="_blank" title="Baby's Best Start">Baby's Best Start</a> tool kit.</p> <p>Keywords: exposure, declaration, radiation, radioactive, radioactivity</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/news?tag=235" hreflang="und">Pregnancy</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?tag=261" hreflang="und">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Wed, 28 Sep 2011 03:18:49 +0000 admin 2178 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Varicella (Chicken Pox) https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/varicella-chicken-pox <span class="field--node--title">Varicella (Chicken Pox)</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/index.php/news?cat=172" hreflang="und">Keeping You Safe At Work</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/index.php/news?cat=138" hreflang="und">Occupational Health Clinic</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/index.php/news?cat=139" hreflang="und">Resource Articles</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/index.php/users/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 09/27/2011 - 22:18</span> <a href="/health-wellness/index.php/blog-post-rss/2174" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Varicella (Chicken Pox)"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Occupational Health Clinic</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Chickenpox is normally a fairly mild childhood illness caused by the varicella virus. Humans are the only source of infection for this highly contagious virus. Humans are infected by person to person transmission when virus comes in contact with upper respiratory tract or eyes and by contact with lesion drainage from someone with chickenpox.</p> <p>The usual symptoms include fever and a generalized itchy blister type rash that will form crusts in a few days. It can occasionally cause serious side effects in both children and adults. It can be particularly serious in pregnant women, immunocompromised persons and the elderly. Varicella tends to be more serious in adolescents and adults than in young children. Complications from this disease include dehydration, pneumonia, bacterial infection of the skin lesions, central nervous system involvement such as encephalitis and rarely can involve the kidneys along with arthritis and hepatitis. It can produce serious complications for the unborn infant if the mother has chickenpox during the early part of her pregnancy.</p> <p>Treatment for uncomplicated chickenpox is usually targeted at symptom relief. There are antiviral medications that can be used in some circumstances on the advice of a physician. Avoid using aspirin in children who have chickenpox as its use has been associated with Reyes syndrome in children.</p> <p>Even though this infection is usually mild, most people would still like to avoid it! The good news is that you can – we have had a vaccine to prevent chickenpox since 1995. It may be given to both children and adults who have never had the disease. This vaccine may be given to children once they reach the age of 12 months if they have not had chickenpox disease. It is also effective for older children and adults who have not had chickenpox disease. Vaccine dosage is age dependent with 2 doses recommended if over the age of 13 years.</p> <p>How do you know if you are protected from chickenpox? Normally if you have ever had chickenpox, you will have lifetime immunity or protection, and cannot get it a second time. However, it has been documented that on rare occasions a person will experience a second case of chickenpox. Because of this rare occurrence, all medical center employees are screened with a blood test that documents your protection from the disease.</p> <p>If the test shows that you are susceptible to chickenpox, varicella vaccine is given. Two doses of <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/index.php/news-resource-articles/varicella-vaccine" title="Varicella Vaccine">varicella vaccine</a> is recommended in adults who do not have laboratory evidence of prior infection. Immunity testing is not recommended routinely after vaccination, but if you are exposed to a person with chickenpox after you have been vaccinated, your immunity may be checked at the time of exposure to see if the vaccine protection has worn off.</p> <h3 class="ms-standardheader">Additional information:</h3> <p><a href="http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/varicella.html" target="_blank" title="Varicella (Chicken pox vaccine)">Varicella (Chicken pox vaccine) </a></p> <p><a href="https://www.cdc.gov/chickenpox/about/index.html" target="_blank" title="Information on Varicella from the CDC">Information on Varicella from the CDC</a></p> <p>Keywords: Varivax, Varicella, chickenpox, immunity, immunization, inoculation, shot, vaccination</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/index.php/news?tag=237" hreflang="und">Prevention</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/index.php/news?tag=258" hreflang="und">Vaccines</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/index.php/news?tag=261" hreflang="und">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Wed, 28 Sep 2011 03:18:48 +0000 admin 2174 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Vanderbilt Surveillance Program Screening Requirements https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/vanderbilt-surveillance-program-screening-requirements <span class="field--node--title">Vanderbilt Surveillance Program Screening Requirements</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/news?cat=172" hreflang="und">Keeping You Safe At Work</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?cat=138" hreflang="und">Occupational Health Clinic</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?cat=139" hreflang="und">Resource Articles</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 09/27/2011 - 22:18</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/2173" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Vanderbilt Surveillance Program Screening Requirements"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Occupational Health Clinic</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Compliance with all applicable Vanderbilt Occupational Health medical surveillance and fitness for duty programs is required and compliance status is automatically imported into the Vanderbilt University Medical Center Performance Evaluation System (VPES).</p> <p>Employees may view their own compliance status for individual programs through the <a href="https://hwip.app.vumc.org/hwip/" target="_blank" title="Health &amp; Wellness Information Portal">Health &amp; Wellness Information Portal</a>. All medical screening requirements applicable to the individual's job and department are included in compliance status. Items marked as "VPES Items" are hazard programs whose compliance status is sent to VPES for use in employee evaluations.</p> <p>Supervisors may view compliance status for individual programs by running reports in Business Objects. Complete instructions on getting access to the BO reports can be found <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/verifying-compliance" title="here">here</a>.</p> <p class="ExternalClassF702E631BD9D41ED98352B2E0D0322EE">Below is a list of all requirements included in the Immunization &amp; Screening Compliance field on the Policy &amp; Safety Compliance page within VPES, and in Occupational Health Compliance in the Compliance Portal.</p> <ul> <li><strong>Hepatitis B: </strong>Per VUMC policy <a href="https://vanderbilt.policytech.com/dotNet/documents/?docid=10262" target="_blank" title="QSRP 10-10.08">QSRP 10-10.08</a> Immunization Program for Faculty/Staff, employees whose jobs involve contact with patients, blood, body fluids or human tissue must either complete the hepatitis B vaccine series, or submit a signed declination form.</li> <li><strong>Measles: </strong>Per VUMC policy <a href="https://vanderbilt.policytech.com/dotNet/documents/?docid=10262" target="_blank" title="QSRP 10-10.08">QSRP 10-10.08</a> Immunization Program for Faculty/Staff, employees born on or after 1/1/1957 must provide proof of vaccination or immunity to measles. For details, see <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/all-aboard/vumc-immunization-requirements" target="_blank" title="VUMC Compliance Requirements">VUMC Compliance Requirements</a>.</li> <li><strong>Mumps:</strong> Per VUMC policy <a href="https://vanderbilt.policytech.com/dotNet/documents/?docid=10262" target="_blank" title="QSRP 10-10.08">QSRP 10-10.08</a> Immunization Program for Faculty/Staff, employees born on or after 1/1/1957 must provide proof of vaccination or immunity to mumps. For details, see <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/all-aboard/vumc-immunization-requirements" target="_blank" title="VUMC Compliance Requirements">VUMC Compliance Requirements</a>.</li> <li><strong>Rubella:</strong> Per VUMC policy <a href="https://vanderbilt.policytech.com/dotNet/documents/?docid=10262" target="_blank" title="QSRP 10-10.08">QSRP 10-10.08</a> Immunization Program for Faculty/Staff, all VUMC faculty/staff must provide proof of vaccination or immunity to rubella (German measles). For details, see <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/all-aboard/vumc-immunization-requirements" target="_blank" title="VUMC Compliance Requirements">VUMC Compliance Requirements.</a></li> <li><strong>Varicella: </strong>Per VUMC policy <a href="https://vanderbilt.policytech.com/dotNet/documents/?docid=10262" target="_blank" title="QSRP 10-10.08">QSRP 10-10.08</a> Immunization Program for Faculty/Staff, employees born on or after 1/1/1957 must provide proof of vaccination or immunity to varicella (chickenpox). For details, see <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/all-aboard/vumc-immunization-requirements" target="_blank">VUMC Compliance Requirements.</a></li> <li><strong>Tuberculosis (Annual): </strong>Per VUMC Policy <a href="https://vanderbilt.policytech.com/dotNet/documents/?docid=10808" target="_blank" title="OP 30-10.14">OP 30-10.14</a> Tuberculin (TB) Testing for Healthcare Personnel, annual TB skin testing is required for VUMC faculty and staff, except those departments without patient contact which have been exempted.</li> <li><strong>N-95 Respirator:</strong> Per VUMC Policy <a href="https://vanderbilt.policytech.com/dotNet/documents/?docid=5218" target="_blank" title="SA 10-10.14">SA 10-10.14</a> Respiratory Protection, individuals who care for patients on airborne precautions, or who enter occupied negative pressure must have an initial medical clearance to wear a respirator, and undergo <a href="https://www.vumc.org/safety/clinical/n-95-respirator-program" target="_blank" title="fit testing">fit testing</a> annually. Fit testing is provided by Vanderbilt Environmental Health and Safety (VEHS).</li> <li><strong>Animal Care:</strong> Division of Animal Care employees and all faculty and staff involved in research utilizing animals must be enrolled in the <a href="https://www4.vanderbilt.edu/acup/dac/working-with-animals.php" target="_blank" title="Occupational Health and Safety Program">Occupational Health and Safety Program</a>. This includes initial and subsequent annual completion of an <a href="https://redcap.vanderbilt.edu/surveys/index.php?s=WLFEYH7NJT" target="_blank" title="animal allergy questionnaire">animal allergy questionnaire</a> as well as species-specific services based on animal exposure.  A <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/simian-herpes-b-exam" title="Simian Herpes B Exam">herpes B physical exam</a> is required for those working with macaques (and TB skin testing compliance is required for individuals working with any non-human primate). A <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/q-fever-exam" title="Q Fever Exam">Q fever exam</a> is required annually for those with occupational exposure to sheep.</li> <li><strong>Noise:</strong> Personnel exposed to high levels of occupational noise, as identified by VEHS, are required to participate in the <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/resource-articles-blog/hearing-conservation-program" title="Hearing Conservation Program">Hearing Conservation Program</a>, which includes baseline and annual hearing tests, per the <a href="http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_id=9735&amp;p_table=STANDARDS" target="_blank" title="OSHA noise standard 1910.9">OSHA noise standard 1910.95</a>. Individuals enrolled in this program include Lifeflight crew, Lifeflight Event Medicine personnel, groundskeepers, power plant personnel, and Division of Animal Care technicians who work in the cage wash area.</li> <li><strong>Formaldehyde:</strong> Individuals exposed to formaldehyde at levels above the action level as designated by the <a href="http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS&amp;p_id=10075" target="_blank" title="OSHA formaldehyde standard 1910.1048">OSHA formaldehyde standard 1910.1048</a> are required to participate in the <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/formaldehyde-program" title="Formaldehyde Program">Formaldehyde Medical Surveillance Program</a>. This program includes pre-placement and annual physical exam and pulmonary function tests, and a baseline medical clearance for respirator use. Individuals enrolled in this program include first year pathology residents, faculty who use cadavers to teach anatomy, staff who embalm bodies, and surgical pathology staff who are exposed as determined by VEHS. Medical Surveillance is required in the <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/default/files/public_files/PDFs/ohc/ohc_LEOC-1_01_CHM_06_Formaldehyde_Exposure_Control_Policy.pdf" target="_blank" title="Formaldehyde Exposure Control Policy">Formaldehyde Exposure Control Policy</a>.</li> <li><strong>Decontamination Team: </strong>VUH and VCH Emergency Department faculty and staff who have been designated and trained to dress out and work in the decontamination line during an emergency event are required to participate in the Decontamination Team Medical Surveillance program. This includes completion of a medical questionnaire and appropriate follow-up (if needed) to determine medical fitness to wear the required respirator and gear. In addition, medical clearance must once again be confirmed prior to dressing out at the time of an event and at regular intervals during the course of that event. Medical clearance requirements are likewise outlined in the VUH decontamination plan and the <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/default/files/public_files/PDFs/ohc/ohc_Compliance_guidelines_for_the_pediatric_emergency_department.pdf" target="_blank" title="VCH decontamination plan protocol">VCH decontamination plan protocol</a>.</li> <li><strong>Hazmat:</strong> Vanderbilt Environmental Health &amp; Safety staff who routinely handle hazardous waste for disposal and assist in clean up of chemical spills are required to participate in the <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/resource-articles-news/hazmat-physicals" title="Hazmat Physicals">HAZMAT Medical Surveillance Program</a>. The screening includes a pre-placement and annual physical examination, appropriate lab work, and clearance for respirator use. Medical requirements are outlined in the Vanderbilt Environmental Health and Safety HazMat team Chemical Incident Emergency Response Plan, as well as in <a href="http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS&amp;p_id=9765" target="_blank" title="OSHA standard 1910.120">OSHA standard 1910.120</a>, "Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response".</li> <li><strong>Child Care:</strong> Childcare workers at Susan Gray School, Vanderbilt Child and Family Center, and Mama Lere Hearing School are required to have a physical exam every 3 years or as otherwise necessary to meet TN Department of Education requirements (see section 1240-04-03-.05 (9) c and d).</li> <li><strong>Lifeflight:</strong> LifeFlight faculty and staff who transport patients on aircraft are required to participate in the <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/lifeflight-physicals" title="Lifeflight Physicals">Lifeflight Fitness For Duty Program</a>. This program includes pre-placement and annual physical examinations, including vision and hearing screening. Medical Screening Requirements are outlined in the applicable Lifeflight Departmental Policy and are consistent with Tennessee Department of Health EMS Flight Crew licensure requirements (see section 1200-12-1-.05 (5)(b)3). These individuals are also required to be enrolled in the <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/resource-articles-blog/hearing-conservation-program" title="Hearing Conservation Program">Hearing Conservation Program</a>.</li> <li><strong>Medical Transport Systems:</strong> Individuals who are medical transport team members, including those on the Lifeflight and Neonatal Transport teams, must participate in the Medical Transport Systems surveillance program. This includes an annual <a href="https://redcap.vanderbilt.edu/surveys/?s=b7nFWwZVCk" target="_blank" title="medical questionnaire">medical questionnaire</a> to ensure safe and quality patient care. The Survey also provides an opportunity for the individual to request an accommodation if necessary. The survey meets the medical surveillance requirements for certification by the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Transport Systems (CAMTS).</li> <li><strong>Police and Security:</strong> Police and Security officer candidates, including <a href="https://webapp.mis.vanderbilt.edu/jobs/" target="_blank" title="police officer trainee, police officer certified, sergeant, lieutenant, and detective">police officer trainee, police officer certified, sergeant, lieutenant, and detective</a> are required to enroll in the <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/resource-articles-news/police-department-physicals" title="Police Department Physicals">Vanderbilt Police Fitness For Duty Program</a>. This includes a pre-placement physical examination with emphasis on cardiovascular fitness. Lab work for total cholesterol and HDL is also obtained, and referral for stress testing or other cardiac evaluation is done on a case-by-case basis.</li> <li><strong>Standardized Patient:</strong> Individuals functioning as standardized patients for medical student education and training are required to participate in the <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/standardized-patient-baseline-exam" title="Standardized Patient Baseline Exam">Standardized Patient Fitness For Duty Program</a>. This program includes pre-placement physical examination. The employee will be provided a copy of the physical exam findings so that he or she can best determine ability to participate in specific simulated exams. Requirements are outlined in the <a href="https://webapp.mis.vanderbilt.edu/jobs/" target="_blank" title="Standardized Patient Job Description">Standardized Patient Job Description</a>.</li> <li><strong>MRI: </strong>Individuals working near MRI magnets are required to complete an annual <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/mri-screening-questionnaire" title="MRI Screening Form">MRI Screening Form</a> to ensure that they do not have an implanted device or other condition that would make it unsafe for them to be near the MRI. This program follows the recommendations of the <a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jmri.24011/pdf" target="_blank" title="American College of Radiology Guidance Document for Safe MRI Practices">American College of Radiology Guidance Document for Safe MRI Practices</a>.</li> <li><strong><strong>Traffic </strong>and Parking:</strong> Vanderbilt shuttle and Vandy Van drivers are required to undergo a Commercial Driver Medical Examination by Occupational Health to obtain and renew their Commercial Drivers' License medical certification. The medical certification is required as outlined by the Department of Transportation's Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration <a href="http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/rules-regulations/topics/medical/medical.htm" target="_blank" title="Medical Program">Medical Program</a> in order to drive a commercial vehicle, such as the Vanderbilt shuttles and vans. The frequency of the necessary examination and any other additional medical evaluations is determined on an individual basis and follows the DOT guidelines.</li> <li><strong>Communications Officer:</strong> VUPS Communications Officer candidates are required to enroll in the Vanderbilt University Communications Officer (CALEA) Fitness for Duty program. This includes a pre-placement <a href="https://redcap.vanderbilt.edu/surveys/?s=3RYATKPCPR" target="_blank" title="REDCap medical history survey">REDCap medical history survey </a>as well as a hearing test and vision screening. This program is implemented in accordance with Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA) accreditation standards. </li> </ul> <h3 class="ms-standardheader">Additional Information:</h3> <p><a href="https://webapp.mis.vanderbilt.edu/vpes/" target="_blank" title="The Vanderbilt Performance Evaluation System (VPES)">The Vanderbilt Performance Evaluation System (VPES)</a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/news?tag=244" hreflang="und">Screening Exams</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?tag=252" hreflang="und">TB Skin Test</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?tag=258" hreflang="und">Vaccines</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?tag=261" hreflang="und">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Wed, 28 Sep 2011 03:18:48 +0000 admin 2173 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Tuberculosis https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/tuberculosis <span class="field--node--title">Tuberculosis</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/news?cat=172" hreflang="und">Keeping You Safe At Work</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?cat=138" hreflang="und">Occupational Health Clinic</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?cat=139" hreflang="und">Resource Articles</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 09/27/2011 - 22:18</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/2172" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Tuberculosis"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Occupational Health Clinic</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><img align="right" alt="" class="alignright size-full wp-image-2576" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/ohcTuberculosis.jpg" style="width: 245px; height: 190px; margin: 5px;" title="Tuberculosis" /></p> <p>The Occupational Health Clinic (OHC) has a program that screens staff for tuberculosis at the time of hire and after an exposure by using the TB skin test. We will also evaluate your health status to be sure that you are able to use personal protective equipment that can prevent an exposure.</p> <p><strong>What is tuberculosis (TB)? </strong>Tuberculosis is an airborne communicable disease caused by <em>Mycobacterium tuberculosis </em>(MTB).</p> <p><strong>How do you get TB? </strong>TB is spread by tiny airborne particles that may be generated when a person with infectious tuberculosis sneezes, coughs, speaks or sings. Infection occurs when a susceptible person inhales these infected droplets.</p> <p><strong>Who is required to be TB skin tested?</strong> All new employees of the medical center are required to have two-step TB skin testing. The first TB skin test will be administered at the initial Occupational Health evaluation. The second TB skin test should be administered two weeks later. See <a href="https://vanderbilt.policytech.com/dotNet/documents/?docid=4392&amp;mode=view" target="_blank" title="Policy OP 30-10.14">Policy OP 30-10.14</a>. Positive TB skin tests will be followed up with a blood test to confirm the result.</p> <p>How often must you be tested? No routine testing is required after your new hire screening has been completed. Please note: individuals working with non-human primates or tuberculosis bacteria in a research setting will need to be tested on at least an annual basis. If you have a known exposure to tuberculosis during the year, additional testing is required. See <a href="https://vanderbilt.policytech.com/dotNet/documents/?docid=4392&amp;mode=view" target="_blank" title="Policy OP 30-10.14">Policy OP 30-10.14</a>.<br />  </p> <p><strong>When should my TB skin test be read? </strong>The TB skin test must be read within 48 to 72 hours after it is placed. If it is not read within this time limit, a repeat test will be required.</p> <p><strong>Can I read my own test and call in my results? </strong>No one may read his/her own skin test. A trained reader must read your TB skin test. Trained readers include: any physician, or nurse practitioner, most Occupational Health Clinic staff and certain persons from designated units that have been trained/certified by OHC.</p> <p><strong>What if my test is negative? </strong>If your TB skin test is negative, no further action is needed until your next scheduled testing or following an exposure.</p> <p><strong>What if my test is positive? </strong>If your test is positive, you will have a follow up blood test to confirm the result. If the blood test is also positive, you must have a chest x-ray. You will not need to take another TB skin test – it may always be positive. You will need an appointment with an OHC provider to decide if further evaluation and/or treatment are needed.</p> <p><strong>I had BCG Vaccine. Do I have to be tested? </strong>You will need to have a TB skin test unless you have previously had a positive TB skin test. A TB skin test is required for persons who have had BCG vaccinations but never had a TB test. The skin test can help determine if the person does or does not have a TB infection.</p> <p><strong>I am pregnant, should I still have a TB skin test? </strong>Vanderbilt does not exempt pregnant women from TB testing. This is <a href="http://www.cdc.gov/TB/topic/populations/pregnancy/default.htm" target="_blank" title="supported by the CDC">supported by the CDC. </a>Testing is safe in pregnancy and healthcare workers are at risk of acquiring TB, so pregnant women in occupational testing programs should be screened as usual. See <a href="https://vanderbilt.policytech.com/dotNet/documents/?docid=4392&amp;mode=view" target="_blank" title="Policy OP 30-10.14">Policy OP 30-10.14</a>.</p> <p><strong>How do I obtain a copy of my TB skin test reading? </strong>Log in to the <a href="https://hwip.app.vumc.org/hwip/ohc_history.jsp" target="_blank" title="Health &amp; Wellness Information Portal">Health and Wellness Information Portal</a> for a printable copy of your immunization record, which includes your latest TB test results.</p> <p>Keywords: PPD, Tuberculosis, TBST</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/news?tag=244" hreflang="und">Screening Exams</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?tag=252" hreflang="und">TB Skin Test</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/news?tag=261" hreflang="und">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Wed, 28 Sep 2011 03:18:47 +0000 admin 2172 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Toxoplasmosis https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/toxoplasmosis <span class="field--node--title">Toxoplasmosis</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/index.php/news?cat=172" hreflang="und">Keeping You Safe At Work</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/index.php/news?cat=138" hreflang="und">Occupational Health Clinic</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/index.php/news?cat=139" hreflang="und">Resource Articles</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/index.php/users/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 09/27/2011 - 22:18</span> <a href="/health-wellness/index.php/blog-post-rss/2171" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Toxoplasmosis"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Occupational Health Clinic</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><img alt="" class="alignright size-full wp-image-2574" src="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/index.php/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/images/ohc/ohcToxoplasmosis.jpg" style="width: 245px; height: 281px; margin: 5px; float: right;" title="Toxoplasmosis" />A parasite called <em>Toxoplasma gondii</em> causes a disease known as toxoplasmosis. Most adults have already had toxoplasmosis; toxoplasmosis shows few or no symptoms 90% of the time. However, pregnant women and individuals with weakened immune systems should be cautious. For them, a <em>Toxoplasma</em> infection can cause serious health problems.</p>&#13; &#13; <p>In a research setting, a <em>Toxoplasma</em> infection is unlikely but can occur through contact with cat feces from a <em>Toxoplasma</em>-infected cat that is shedding the organism in its feces. This might happen if you were to accidentally touch your hands to your mouth after cleaning a cat's litter box, for example, or touching anything that has come in contact with cat feces.</p>&#13; &#13; <p>Infection is more likely to occur outside the workplace through contact with cat feces or consumption of contaminated water or raw/partially cooked meat (especially pork, lamb, or venison) but on rare occasions has occurred in the research setting.</p>&#13; &#13; <p>Symptoms of the infection vary. Most people who become infected with <em>Toxoplasma</em> are not aware of it. Some people may feel as if they have the "flu" with swollen glands or muscle aches and pains that last for a month or more. Severe cases are more likely in individuals who have weak immune systems. Occasionally, even persons with healthy immune systems may experience damage to the brain, eyes or other organs. Symptoms of eye toxoplasmosis can include reduced vision, blurred vision, pain (often with bright light), redness of the eye, and sometimes tearing. Babies who are infected while still in the womb have no symptoms at birth, but may develop symptoms later in life. A small percentage of infected newborns have serious eye or brain damage at birth.</p>&#13; &#13; <p>If you are pregnant or have concerns about toxoplasmosis, talk to a health care provider in the Occupational Health Clinic (OHC). The OHC may order blood tests specific for toxoplasmosis. The results can help OHC determine whether you have a <em>Toxoplasma </em>infection and if it is a recent (acute) infection.</p>&#13; &#13; <p>Once a diagnosis of toxoplasmosis is confirmed, you and your health care provider can discuss whether treatment is necessary. In an otherwise healthy person who is not pregnant, treatment usually is not needed. If symptoms occur, they typically go away within a few weeks to months. For individuals with weak immune systems, the only risk is reactivation of the infection. For pregnant women or persons who have weakened immune systems, medications are available to treat toxoplasmosis.</p>&#13; &#13; <p><strong>To protect yourself from toxoplasmosis: </strong></p>&#13; &#13; <ul><li>Wear gloves when working with cats or litter boxes, gardening or landscaping.</li>&#13; <li>Wash your hands with soap and water after working with cats, gardening or landscaping.</li>&#13; <li>Change the litter box daily. The <em>Toxoplasma</em> parasite does not become infectious until one to two days after it is shed in a cat's feces.</li>&#13; </ul><p>Keywords: toxoplasmosis, pregnancy, animal, cat</p>&#13; </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/index.php/news?tag=185" hreflang="und">Animal Care Program</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/index.php/news?tag=213" hreflang="und">Exposure Management</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/index.php/news?tag=260" hreflang="und">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/index.php/news?tag=261" hreflang="und">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Wed, 28 Sep 2011 03:18:47 +0000 admin 2171 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness