Sim B., BSN, RN - 8 MCE/MICU

NRBack in the fall of 2018, I started as a nurse resident on 8MCE when it was a cardiac stepdown unit. VUMC is a magnet hospital and they maintain good patient ratios. They are focused on mental health and support for nurses. There are a lot of amazing opportunities for advancement and I have education available. All of this set the VUMC Nurse Residency Program apart from other hospitals.  

The Nurse Residency Program is not only for the first year, it’s also a way to get involved to help more new nurse residents through precepting and coaching. The nurse residency program is the first stepping stone as a new nurse. After completing the program, we give back to new nurse residents and are mentored through life decisions. I attained my PCCN at my one-year mark and became an RSL. I also achieved my RN3 at my 2-year mark. I’m a co-chair for the VUAH nursing staff council and have joined a lot of committees such as the clinical practice committee and the DAISY award committee. I wanted to get involved and do a lot of projects from the beginning. 

When COVID-19 hit, our floor transitioned to the COVID unit where I work with an interdisciplinary team. Working on a COVID unit has impacted all aspects of my life from physical, emotional, and social. Physically, as nurses, we have to gown and wear PPE, whether the transition between COVID and non-COVID patients and float to different areas of the hospital. Part of the support VUMC has provided includes a weekly session about compassion by the Work-Life Connections group. The leadership also brought in a life coach to help with emotional support.
 
There is also a huge focus on diversity and inclusion and making sure that nobody is left behind here at VUMC. As a minority, I feel supported by all my coworkers and leadership. This makes me be proud to work at Vanderbilt. In terms of dealing with COVID, the leadership looked at the best practice, what was working, and supported us to practice safely. Leadership are transparent and visible, I get to talk to the CNO and they listen to the frontline nurses. I’m proud to be called a Vanderbilt nurse. 

Vanderbilt is not only a place for your first career, but it’s a place for you to learn how to be a good nurse. The opportunities are limitless and working with the interdisciplinary team helps nurses to develop critical thinking and provide care for patients.