Living Healthy, Feeling Good https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/ en Participate Virtually in Health Plus Programs and Services https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/resource-articles/participate-virtually-health-plus-programs-and-services <span class="field--node--title">Participate Virtually in Health Plus Programs and Services</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=173" hreflang="und">Living Healthy, Feeling Good</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=137" hreflang="und">Health Plus</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=139" hreflang="und">Resource Articles</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 09/17/2019 - 15:35</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3199" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Participate Virtually in Health Plus Programs and Services"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Health Plus</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Health <em>Plus </em>offers many programs and services in virtual formats to promote healthy lifestyles in the Vanderbilt community. Virtual access is available to those located on or off campus and at a variety of times to meet the needs of Vanderbilt's diverse community.</p> <ul><li><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/go-gold" title="Go for the Gold"><strong>Go for the Gold</strong></a> - Identify health risks, take action to reduce those risks, and earn a yearly Wellness Credit.</li> <li><strong><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/start-physical-activity-program" title="START! Physical Activity Program">START! Physical Activity Program</a></strong> - Log physical activity or sync a device and earn rewards.</li> <li><strong><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/know-your-numbers" title="Know Your Numbers">Know Your Numbers</a></strong> - Track weight and body mass index.</li> <li><strong><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news/mindful-breaks" title="Mindful Breaks">Mindful Breaks</a></strong>  - Relax and rejuvenate with guided stretching and breathing.</li> <li><strong><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/online-workouts" title="Online Workouts">Online Workouts</a></strong> - Choose from a variety of online workouts to get active.</li> <li><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/healthier-you-presentations" title="Healthier You Presentations"><strong>Healthier You Presentations</strong></a><strong> </strong>- Participate in monthly 45-minute presentations on a variety of health and well-being topics.</li> <li><strong><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/lifestyle-coaching" title="Lifestyle Coaching">Lifestyle Coaching</a></strong> - Engage in personal lifestyle coaching to help you find motivation and learn tools to reach your health goals.</li> <li><strong><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/taste" title="TASTE">TASTE</a></strong> - Eat delicious food, save money, and minimize your time in the kitchen with this ten week practice June—September.</li> <li><strong><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/control-goal" title="Control is the Goal">Control is the Goal</a></strong> - Manage blood pressure in this Health <em>Plus </em>program.</li> <li><strong><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/news-resource-articles/diabetes-prevention-program" title="Diabetes Prevention Program">Diabetes Prevention Program</a></strong> - Participate in a proven, year long, small group program to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by developing skills to lose weight, be more physically active, and manage stress.</li> </ul></div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=260" hreflang="und">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=261" hreflang="und">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Tue, 17 Sep 2019 20:35:50 +0000 harnessg 3199 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness MyPlate Your Way https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/resource-articles/myplate-your-way <span class="field--node--title">MyPlate Your Way</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=173" hreflang="und">Living Healthy, Feeling Good</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=137" hreflang="und">Health Plus</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=139" hreflang="und">Resource Articles</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 09/17/2019 - 15:16</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3198" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to MyPlate Your Way"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Health Plus</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>​How much do I need to eat in one day?</strong></p> <p>Calculating calorie needs can be tricky and very individualized. Not everyone has access to a registered dietitian, so an easy way to determine daily calorie needs is the "calories in - calories out" method. The goal of this method is to balance the calories from food and drinks with the calories burned throughout the day. To easily figure out your average calories burned, you can use a health app on any smart phone or fitness tracker. These devices can do complex calculations to determine how many calories you burn through the body's natural processes and physical activity. Once the average calories-burned is calculated, these devices can estimate the number of calories you should consume to gain, maintain, or lose weight.</p> <p><strong>What do I need to eat in a day?</strong></p> <p>In one day, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends consuming 2 servings of fruit (about 1 cup or 2 light bulb-sized whole fruits), 3 cups of vegetables, 5-6 ounces of protein, and 3 cups of dairy. In addition, aim to consume 6-7 ounces of grains, with at least half from whole grains. To simplify these guidelines, follow the MyPlate method! This method focuses on the 5 food groups while ensuring adequate portion size and nutrient intake. Instead of excluding entire food groups, as many diets do, the MyPlate method emphasizes eating a wide variety of foods.</p> <p><img align="right" alt="My Plate" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/default/files/public_files/images/hp/hpMyPlate.png" /><strong>Try these tips for following MyPlate:</strong></p> <ul><li>Make <strong>half your plate</strong> vegetables and fruits to fuel your body with vitamins and minerals it needs to function at its best. These foods also tend to be lower in calories, allowing you to eat more volume to help reach a feeling of fullness.</li> <li>Be creative and eat <strong>fruits and vegetables in a variety of colors</strong>. Think outside of the box when cooking, and don't be afraid to experiment with different foods and methods. Steam, roast, grill, sauté, broil, or bake, and try cooking with a new vegetable!</li> <li>Focus on eating <strong>whole grains</strong> rather than refined grains such as white rice, white flour, white bread, cakes, cookies, and dessert snacks. Unlike refined grains, whole grains contain the entire grain kernel, which is packed with nutrients including iron, dietary fiber, and essential B vitamins. The Dietary Guidelines recommend you eat between 25-38 grams of fiber each day, and whole grains help to achieve this. Whole grains can be found in whole-wheat flour, oatmeal, brown rice, quinoa, and many more sources.</li> <li>Try a <strong>variety of protein</strong> sources. Protein helps build muscle and creates a feeling of fullness. Many people think of protein as meat, but it can be found in an assortment of other sources! Mix it up and try some seafood, beans, tofu, nuts, eggs, or poultry as the main dish in your meals.</li> <li>Choose <strong>low-fat or fat-free</strong> dairy options to limit saturated fat intake while still getting the essential nutrients of dairy such as calcium, protein, and vitamin D.</li> </ul><p>Finding a healthy eating regimen that works for your lifestyle and family can be difficult, but the MyPlate method helps ensure you are consuming the appropriate amount of nutrients you need to fuel your body to become a healthier you!</p> <p><strong>Practice</strong></p> <p>Try making half your plate fruits and veggies at each meal. For an extra challenge, experiment with a new vegetable or fruit to add variety and color! </p> <p><strong>Recipe</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/default/files/public_files/PDFs/hp/hpMyPlatePowerBreakfastSmoothie.pdf" target="_blank" title="MyPlate Power Breakfast Smoothie">MyPlate Power Breakfast Smoothie</a></p> <p><strong>References</strong></p> <ol><li>Healthy Eating Made Easier. Dairy Council of California. <a href="https://www.healthyeating.org/Health-Wellness-Providers/Nutrition-Information/MyPlate" target="_blank">https://www.healthyeating.org/Health-Wellness-Providers/Nutrition-Information/MyPlate</a></li> <li>Men and Women. Choose MyPlate. <a href="https://www.choosemyplate.gov/men-and-women" target="_blank" title="https://www.choosemyplate.gov/men-and-women.">https://www.choosemyplate.gov/men-and-women</a>.</li> <li>Ten Tips to Choose MyPlate. Choose MyPlate. <a href="https://www.choosemyplate.gov/ten-tips-choose-myplate" target="_blank" title="https://www.choosemyplate.gov/ten-tips-choose-myplate">https://www.choosemyplate.gov/ten-tips-choose-myplate</a>.</li> </ol></div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=223" hreflang="und">Healthy Eating</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=232" hreflang="und">Nutrition</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=260" hreflang="und">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=261" hreflang="und">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Tue, 17 Sep 2019 20:16:43 +0000 harnessg 3198 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Nutrition for Night Owls https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/resource-articles/nutrition-night-owls <span class="field--node--title">Nutrition for Night Owls</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=173" hreflang="und">Living Healthy, Feeling Good</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=139" hreflang="und">Resource Articles</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=137" hreflang="und">Health Plus</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 09/12/2019 - 07:58</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3197" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Nutrition for Night Owls"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Health Plus</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>​Healthy eating is important for everyone, especially those who work at night. Research has shown that working the night shift has been associated with a higher risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease. Good nutrition, along with adequate sleep and exercise, can help lower these risks. </p> <p><strong>Why does working the night shift lead to higher health risks?</strong></p> <p>We are wired to sleep at night and eat while awake during the day. When the body's natural sleep-wake cycle is disrupted, we do not digest food as well. The hormone leptin, which tells us when we are full, has a harder time being released at night. This can lead to overeating and weight gain, because our bodies do not know we are already satisfied. Nighttime eating also causes higher blood glucose levels after meals. This happens because when we are awake at night, the body has a harder time responding to insulin, which controls blood glucose. These high glucose levels and decreased use of insulin can lead to diabetes and damage the blood vessels.</p> <p>Many find it difficult to eat well when their days and nights are reversed. Studies have shown that working at night is associated with eating fewer fruits and vegetables and more foods that are high in sugar and fat. Eating too many fatty foods and not enough healthy foods can cause weight gain and negatively affect heart health.</p> <p><strong>How can I eat healthy while working the night shift?</strong></p> <p>Timing - It is possible to eat a healthy diet while working the night shift. Try to eat three complete meals as close as possible to normal meal times during the day. The body does not process food as well during the night, so avoid or limit eating between midnight and 6:00 a.m. </p> <p>Quality - What you eat is also important. Drink water instead of sugar-sweetened beverages and choose baked or grilled foods instead of fried options. Snack on fruit, nuts, or unbuttered popcorn. Plan and prep meals on off days to make workday meals quick and easy. This can also help avoid impulse buys of food with less quality. Practice good nutrition by following by following these guidelines:</p> <ul><li>Eat a lean protein source at each meal. Chicken, fish, eggs, and beans are great options.</li> <li>Fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables. Aim for a variety of colors.</li> <li>Make half your grains whole grains. Choose foods like brown rice, whole grain bread, and oatmeal.</li> <li>Enjoy 3 servings of low-fat dairy each day. One serving equals one cup of milk, 1.5 ounces of cheese, or one cup of yogurt. </li> </ul><p>With a little planning, you can reduce the health risks associated with working at night. For a balanced approach, eat as close to normal meal times as possible, choose a variety of healthy foods, and remember to also schedule time in your day for adequate sleep and physical activity! You should try to get 7-8 hours of sleep each day and 30 minutes of physical activity 5 times a week.</p> <p><strong>Practice</strong></p> <p>Practice eating healthy, balanced snacks featuring carbohydrates and protein for long-lasting fullness.</p> <p><strong>Recipes</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/default/files/public_files/PDFs/hp/hpChickpeaSandwichFilling.pdf" target="_blank" title="Vegetarian Chickpea Sandwich Filling">Vegetarian Chickpea Sandwich Filling</a><br /><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/default/files/public_files/PDFs/hp/hpShrimpandCouscous.pdf" target="_blank" title="Shrimp and Couscous with Yogurt">Shrimp and Couscous with Yogurt</a></p> <p><strong>Helpful Resources</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/default/files/public_files/PDFs/hp/hpNightShiftHandout.pdf" target="_blank" title="Night Shift Handout">Night Shift Handout</a></p> <p><strong>References:</strong></p> <ol><li>Lowden A, Moreno C, Holmbäck U, Lennernäs M, Tucker P. Eating and shift work - effects on habits, metabolism and performance. Scand J Work Environ Health. 2010 Mar;36(2):150-62.</li> <li>Scheer FA, Hilton MF, Mantzoros CS, et al. Adverse metabolic and cardiovascular consequences of circadian misalignment. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2009;106:4453–8.</li> </ol></div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=223" hreflang="und">Healthy Eating</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=232" hreflang="und">Nutrition</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=260" hreflang="und">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=261" hreflang="und">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Thu, 12 Sep 2019 12:58:04 +0000 harnessg 3197 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness The Juice on Juicing https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/resource-articles/juice-juicing <span class="field--node--title">The Juice on Juicing </span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=137" hreflang="und">Health Plus</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=173" hreflang="und">Living Healthy, Feeling Good</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=139" hreflang="und">Resource Articles</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 09/04/2019 - 09:23</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3192" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to The Juice on Juicing "> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Health Plus</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>​What is Juicing?</strong></p> <p>Juicing is the process of liquifying fruits and vegetables. Unlike smoothies, which can contain milk, yogurt, and more, juices are strictly fruits and vegetables with no added dairy or protein sources. During the juicing process, fiber is separated out which decreases the nutrient content of the fruit or vegetable. Fiber is important because it helps to regulate digestive health. It also supports weight management and heart health. The current <a href="https://www.choosemyplate.gov/dietary-guidelines" target="_blank">Dietary Guidelines for Americans </a>recommend that at least half of your daily fruits and vegetables be whole. Consuming 100% fruit or vegetable juice may help to meet the overall daily recommendation of 5 servings, but juices alone cannot meet this requirement. People who may not enjoy eating whole fruits and vegetables can find juicing to be a fun and creative way to get those nutrients! </p> <p><strong>Juice Cleansing</strong></p> <p>Among the rising nutrition trends is juice cleansing. A juice cleanse involves only consuming calories from fruit and vegetable juices. Juice cleanses claim to rid the body of toxins improving function of internal organs, overall health, and mood. Currently, there is no sound evidence that juice cleansing can reduce the risk of certain diseases or bring the body back to optimal health. In fact, juice cleansing may not be safe for everyone, especially those with health conditions or dietary restrictions. Juices tend to be low calorie, low fiber, and low protein, which can put you at risk for malnutrition.</p> <p><strong>Pros and Cons of Juicing</strong></p> <p>For some, juicing may help to increase nutrient intake and incorporate a variety of fruits and vegetables that would otherwise not be present in the diet. However, research and the Dietary Guidelines discourage relying on juice as the sole source of fruits and vegetables or the sole source of nutrition. Another consideration is that juicing can be expensive. Juicers can range in price from $50-$500 and, depending on the quantity and quality of produce, your grocery bill can add up over time.</p> <p><strong>Takeaway Message</strong></p> <p>While juicing does not necessarily need to be avoided entirely, it is important to incorporate it into a healthy eating plan made up of whole fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat dairy, and lean protein. When choosing juices, pay attention to the ingredients and how they are prepared. Three tips that all juicers should follow include: </p> <ol><li>Read labels. Look for the word pasteurized on juice labels and whether there are any added sugars. Pasteurization is important because it helps to kill any bacteria or microorganisms that may be present in your juice.</li> <li>Be mindful. If unclear, ask whether the juice has been pasteurized, especially when purchasing from a vendor or juice bar. Many times, vendors will not have nutritional information on their juices, so it is important to ask so that you know exactly what is in your drink and how it was made.</li> <li>Prep safely. Make sure all produce is properly handled and washed before use. When produce is squeezed into juice, any bacteria on the skin can become part of the finished product and lead to illness.</li> </ol><p><strong>Practice</strong></p> <p>Eat 5 servings of fruits and vegetables at least one day this week.</p> <p><strong>Recipes</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/default/files/public_files/PDFs/hp/hpPumpkinJuice.pdf" target="_blank" title="Cinnamon-Spiced Apple Carrot Pumpkin Juice">Cinnamon-Spiced Apple Carrot Pumpkin Juice</a><br /><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/default/files/public_files/PDFs/hp/hpStrawberryJuice.pdf" target="_blank" title="Strawberry Cucumber Ginger Juice">Strawberry Cucumber Ginger Juice</a></p> <p><strong>References</strong></p> <ol><li>Nutrition.gov. <a href="https://www.nutrition.gov/" target="_blank">https://www.nutrition.gov</a>.</li> <li>Newgent Jackie. The Juicing Trend - About Raw Juice. Eat Right. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. <a href="https://www.eatright.org/homefoodsafety/safety-tips/food/the-juicing-trend-about-raw-juice" target="_blank">https://www.eatright.org/homefoodsafety/safety-tips/food/the-juicing-trend-about-raw-juice</a>. Published October 15, 2018.</li> </ol></div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=223" hreflang="und">Healthy Eating</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=232" hreflang="und">Nutrition</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=260" hreflang="und">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=261" hreflang="und">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Wed, 04 Sep 2019 14:23:28 +0000 harnessg 3192 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Mediterranean Madness https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/resource-articles/mediterranean-madness <span class="field--node--title">Mediterranean Madness</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=137" hreflang="und">Health Plus</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=139" hreflang="und">Resource Articles</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=173" hreflang="und">Living Healthy, Feeling Good</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 08/26/2019 - 09:50</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3190" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Mediterranean Madness"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Health Plus</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>​What is the Mediterranean diet?</strong></p> <p>The Mediterranean diet is a way of eating based on the food culture in the countries surrounding the Mediterranean Sea. These countries include Spain, Italy, France, and Greece. The eating pattern reflects the types of crops grown in that area, which make up the foundation of their culture. Olives, figs, dates, nuts, citrus fruits, wheat, and grapes are all staple ingredients you'll find in Mediterranean meals. </p> <p>The Mediterranean diet is about more than just the food. Enjoying meals together and being physically active are essential elements of the Mediterranean culture. It is important to remember that food is meant to be shared in the company of friends and family. This strengthens social bonds that make the experience more memorable. Additionally, the energy from your food should be used to do something fun and active like hiking, walking the dog, or playing sports. </p> <p><strong>Fundamental Foods in the Mediterranean Diet</strong></p> <ul><li>Fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, beans, nuts, and seeds are important components of the diet.</li> <li>Fish and poultry are preferred over red meats like beef, pork, and lamb. </li> <li>Olive oil is used as the main source of fat, while limiting fats like butter, margarine, or lard.</li> <li>Cheese, yogurt, milk, and eggs are eaten in moderation.</li> <li>Herbs and spices are favored over salt.</li> <li>Red wine may be enjoyed with dinner.</li> </ul><p><strong>Benefits</strong></p> <p>The benefits of the Mediterranean diet are abundant. While more research is needed to understand how the exact nutrients found in this diet impact the body, it is well established that the Mediterranean diet can improve overall health and well-being. </p> <p>Research shows this way of eating can protect against a variety of diseases like heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, and certain cancers. The Mediterranean diet widely favors olive oil, fruits, and vegetables which all contain key nutrients. One of those key nutrients is monounsaturated fat, a type of fat that is good for the heart. It can be found in olive oil, avocados, nuts, and seeds. It works by lowering the level of "bad" cholesterol that can lead to blockages in blood vessels. Meanwhile, fruits and vegetables have antioxidants which can protect against damage in the body by neutralizing reactive chemicals.</p> <p><strong>How to Eat Mediterranean-Style in the US</strong></p> <ul><li>Add fruits and vegetables to every meal - sneak them into stews, casseroles, and pasta dishes.</li> <li>Substitute olive oil in place of butter and margarine. </li> <li>Spread hummus on a sandwich for extra creaminess and flavor, as well as benefits from its fiber and protein.</li> <li>Use vegetables and spices like garlic, onion, red pepper flakes, or even Mrs. Dash to add flavor to your favorite meals.</li> <li>Eat fish twice a week. Fish tacos, salmon burgers, and canned fish are great options.</li> </ul><p>The Mediterranean diet is not so much a diet as it is a way of life. It is a sustainable way of eating emphasizing fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and, most importantly, enjoying food and physical activity with the ones you love. </p> <p><strong>Practice</strong></p> <p>Try to incorporate all of the following this week:</p> <ul><li>Try to eat fish twice, incorporating those healthy fats. </li> <li>Enjoy a meal with loved ones this week. Put down your phones and experience that time together. </li> <li>Get active! Use the energy you gain from your food to participate in your favorite physical activity.</li> </ul><p><strong>Recipes</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/default/files/public_files/PDFs/hp/hpMediterraneanOrzo.pdf">Mediterranean Orzo Salad with Feta Vinaigrette</a></p> <p><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/default/files/public_files/PDFs/hp/hpMediterraneanTunaChefSalad.pdf">Mediterranean Tuna Chef Salad</a></p> <p><strong>References</strong></p> <ol><li>Mediterranean diet: A heart-healthy eating plan. Mayo Clinic-<a href="https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/mediterranean-diet/art-20047801" target="_blank">https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/mediterranean-diet/art-20047801</a>. Published January 26, 2019.</li> <li>Tosti V, Bertozzi B, Fontana L. Health Benefits of the Mediterranean Diet: Metabolic and Molecular Mechanisms. The Journals of Gerontology: Series A. 2017;73(3):318-326.</li> <li>Trichopoulou A, Martínez-González MA, Tong TY, et al. Definitions and potential health benfits of the Mediterranean diet: views from experts around the world. BMC Medicine. 2014;12(1).<br />  </li> </ol></div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=232" hreflang="und">Nutrition</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=223" hreflang="und">Healthy Eating</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=260" hreflang="und">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=261" hreflang="und">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Mon, 26 Aug 2019 14:50:15 +0000 harnessg 3190 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness The Organic Truth https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/resource-articles/organic-truth <span class="field--node--title">The Organic Truth </span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=137" hreflang="und">Health Plus</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=139" hreflang="und">Resource Articles</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=173" hreflang="und">Living Healthy, Feeling Good</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 08/16/2019 - 13:16</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3186" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to The Organic Truth "> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Health Plus</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>​Grocery shopping can be confusing when unfamiliar words are used to label foods. Below are some descriptions of common terms used on food labels and important considerations to help you navigate the grocery store aisles.</p> <p><strong>What are GMOs?</strong><br /> GMO stands for genetically modified organisms. They can be plants or animals that have been genetically altered, or engineered, in a way that does not occur naturally. These products have been altered to improve a specific trait. For example, apples can be genetically engineered to resist browning. Corn can be genetically engineered to be resistant to insect damage or immune to plant disease. GMOs use science to improve the DNA of organisms to help create the best genetic variations. GMOs are not regulated by the FDA and do not require labeling on foods. However, GMOs have been around since 1980 and have not been known to cause health issues. </p> <p><strong>Should I be concerned about additives?</strong><br /> Food additives have many roles in the food system. They are included in food products to preserve the flavor, texture, nutrition, and appearance of foods. Without food additives, products wouldn't last as long on the grocery store shelves. They also help to prevent food from making us sick by stabilizing the product for transportation. Food additives may also be help prevent powdered products such as cake mixes, sugar products, and flours from developing lumps, caking, or sticking. Stabilizers, thickeners, and gelling agents prevent products from separating, ice crystals from forming, and ingredients from settling.  Unlike GMOs, food additives must be approved for use by the FDA. Once approved, the FDA controls the types of foods they may be added to and how much of the additive may be used.</p> <p><strong>Is organic healthier?</strong><br /> Organic foods are produced following specific guidelines. Organic guidelines require foods to be produced without hormones, pesticides, irradiation, or bioengineering. Animals that are used to produce organic meat, poultry, eggs, or dairy may not be treated with growth hormones or antibiotics. </p> <p>There is no evidence to suggest that organic products contain more nutrients or are overall healthier than conventional products. Compared to conventional farms, it is more expensive for farmers to create organic products and they are not able to produce as much per farm. This increased expense and decreased yield accounts for the increased price of organic products compared to conventional products. </p> <p>It is important to also note that organic farms are sustainable food systems. This means they improve soil organic matter, decrease energy use, and reduce pesticide residue in food and water. Choosing organic foods may not provide more nutritional benefits but can be a sustainable option for the environment. </p> <p>No matter what type of food you purchase, eating a balanced diet with fruits, vegetables, lean proteins, and whole grains is the best meal pattern to follow. It's important to buy foods you're comfortable with and that fit into your budget. </p> <p><strong>Practice</strong><br /> Next time you're at the store, try to identify a non-GMO item, an organic food item, and a conventional item.</p> <p><strong>Recipe</strong><br /> Honey Vanilla Fruit Salad</p> <p><strong>References</strong></p> <ol><li>Begun Rachel. What are Food Additives. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. <a href="https://www.eatright.org/food/vitamins-and-supplements/nutrient-rich-foods/what-are-food-additives" target="_blank">https://www.eatright.org/food/vitamins-and-supplements/nutrient-rich-foods/what-are-food-additives. </a>Published August 16, 2018.</li> <li>Consumer Info about Food from Genetically Engineered Plants. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. <a href="https://www.fda.gov/Food/IngredientsPackagingLabeling/GEPlants/ucm461805.htm" target="_blank">https://www.fda.gov/Food/IngredientsPackagingLabeling/GEPlants/ucm461805.htm</a>. Reviewed January 4, 2018.</li> <li>Organic Food: Fact vs. Perception. American Heart Association. <a href="https://www.heart.org/en/healthy-living/healthy-eating/eat-smart/nutrition-basics/organic-food-fact-vs-perception?s=q%253Dorganic%2526sort%253Drelevancy" target="_blank">https://www.heart.org/en/healthy-living/healthy-eating/eat-smart/nutrition-basics/organic-food-fact-vs-perception?s=q%253Dorganic%2526sort%253Drelevancy</a>. Reviewed April 16, 2018.</li> <li>Overview of Food Ingredients, Additives and Colors. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. <a href="https://www.fda.gov/Food/IngredientsPackagingLabeling/FoodAdditivesIngredients/ucm094211.htm#types" target="_blank">https://www.fda.gov/Food/IngredientsPackagingLabeling/FoodAdditivesIngredients/ucm094211.htm#types</a>. Reviewed February 6, 2018.</li> <li>6 Tips to Lighten Your Carbon Footprint. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. <a href="https://www.eatright.org/food/planning-and-prep/smart-shopping/6-tips-to-lighten-your-carbon-foodprint" target="_blank">https://www.eatright.org/food/planning-and-prep/smart-shopping/6-tips-to-lighten-your-carbon-foodprint</a>. Published April 22, 2019.</li> </ol></div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=223" hreflang="und">Healthy Eating</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=232" hreflang="und">Nutrition</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=260" hreflang="und">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=261" hreflang="und">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 16 Aug 2019 18:16:08 +0000 harnessg 3186 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness The Dish on Dining Out https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/resource-articles/dish-dining-out <span class="field--node--title">The Dish on Dining Out </span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=137" hreflang="und">Health Plus</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=139" hreflang="und">Resource Articles</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=173" hreflang="und">Living Healthy, Feeling Good</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 08/16/2019 - 13:07</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3185" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to The Dish on Dining Out "> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Health Plus</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>People eat out for many reasons including social gatherings, family outings, and busy lifestyles, but it shouldn't be an excuse to put your health on the backburner. Restaurant food can often be high in salt, saturated fat, and calories. Balance, along with choosing dishes wisely, makes it possible to incorporate eating out into a healthy lifestyle. These tips and tricks will help make navigating restaurant menus a breeze!</p> <p><strong>Plan Ahead</strong> <br /> If you know ahead of time that you're going to a restaurant, allow yourself to enjoy your favorite dish with no regrets by planning to have lighter meals full of fruits and veggies during the day. Vice versa, if you ended up splurging on lunch, plan a light dinner in the evening. Many restaurants are now posting menus and nutrition facts online that can be used ahead of time to make an informed decision.</p> <p><strong>Incorporate Physical Activity</strong><br /> Choose a nearby restaurant to walk to instead of driving. One that is within 10 or 15 minutes can help ensure you get 30 minutes of physical activity for the day. This would also help you avoid any parking hassles and spend extra time with friends and family before and after eating. Or choose to take a walk after a meal to help with digestion!</p> <p><strong>Pay Attention to Wording</strong><br /> Descriptions under menu items can give you insight on how food is prepared. Look for words including "grilled," "broiled," or "steamed," meaning the food is cooked with less fat or no fat at all. Avoid dishes with descriptions such as "fried," "breaded," "smothered," "alfredo," "rich," and "creamy."</p> <p><strong>Watch your Portions</strong><br /> Many restaurants serve huge portions. Splitting a meal or taking half of your meal home for leftovers can prevent overeating, double your satisfaction and can be a real money saver. Another option is to choose items off the kids' menu, if allowed. These items are designed to provide smaller portion sizes.</p> <p><strong>Say No to Freebies</strong><br /> Complimentary chips and salsa or bread baskets are frequently offered upon being seated at a restaurant. With endless refills of these freebies, you may end up snacking more than you realize causing calories to add up quickly! Ask the server not to bring these foods to your table to avoid unwanted calories and save room for the more nutrient-dense foods in your meal. </p> <p><strong>Take Your Time</strong><br /> It takes about 20 minutes for your brain to get the message from your stomach that you are no longer hungry. Fast eaters tend to overeat. Slow eaters tend to eat less and are still satisfied. Slow down so you can enjoy your meal and the company you're with.</p> <p><strong>Choose Wisely</strong><br /> Ask for a side salad, vegetables, fruit, or broth-based soups to replace fried and high-fat side options. When it comes to beverages, choose water, fat-free or low-fat milk, unsweetened tea, and other drinks without added sugars to complement your meal. You can also request that butter, cheese, toppings, salad dressings, sauces, and gravies be served on the side. This allows you to control how much you use.</p> <p><strong>Practice</strong><br /> Next time you are out to eat, try incorporating at least 1 of these tips.</p> <p><strong>Recipe</strong><br /><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/PDFs/hp/hpHealthierChowMein.pdf" target="_blank">Healthier Chow Mein</a></p> <p><strong>Helpful Resources</strong><br /><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/PDFs/hp/hpDishonDiningOutHandout.pdf" target="_blank">Dish on Dining Out Handout</a></p> <p><strong>References</strong></p> <ol><li>Gordon Barbara. 7 Tips for Healthy Eating. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. <a href="https://www.eatright.org/health/weight-loss/eating-out/7-tips-for-healthy-dining-out" target="_blank">https://www.eatright.org/health/weight-loss/eating-out/7-tips-for-healthy-dining-out</a>. Published January 3, 2019.</li> <li>10 Tips: Eating Foods Away from Home. United States Department of Agriculture. <a href="https://www.choosemyplate.gov/ten-tips-eating-foods-away-home" target="_blank">https://www.choosemyplate.gov/ten-tips-eating-foods-away-home</a>. Reviewed July 25, 2017.</li> <li>Dining Out Doesn't Mean Ditch your Diet. American Heart Association. <a href="https://www.heart.org/en/healthy-living/healthy-eating/eat-smart/nutrition-basics/dining-out-doesnt-mean-ditch-your-diet" target="_blank">https://www.heart.org/en/healthy-living/healthy-eating/eat-smart/nutrition-basics/dining-out-doesnt-mean-ditch-your-diet</a>. Reviewed January 10, 2017.</li> </ol></div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=223" hreflang="und">Healthy Eating</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=232" hreflang="und">Nutrition</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=260" hreflang="und">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=261" hreflang="und">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 16 Aug 2019 18:07:26 +0000 harnessg 3185 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Eating with the Seasons https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/resource-articles/eating-seasons <span class="field--node--title">Eating with the Seasons</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=139" hreflang="und">Resource Articles</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=173" hreflang="und">Living Healthy, Feeling Good</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=137" hreflang="und">Health Plus</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 08/07/2019 - 14:46</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3183" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Eating with the Seasons"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Health Plus</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h3>​What Does it Mean to Eat Seasonally?</h3> <p>Produce are considered "in-season" when they are at their peak flavor or peak harvest time. In-season fruits and vegetables can be categorized into each season of the year: Winter, Spring, Summer, and Fall. Eating seasonally means consuming foods during this peak time, as they are harvested during their natural growing season.</p> <h3>Why Should We Eat Seasonally?</h3> <p>Seasonal eating can have countless benefits to your health, community, and the environment. Some of the many positives that can come from eating seasonally include:</p> <ul><li>Supporting the local community and farmers by purchasing produce when and where it is grown</li> <li>Decreasing pollution by cutting back on the distance the produce travels </li> <li>Decreasing the energy needed to produce foods in an area or time they would not usually grow </li> <li>Saving money at the grocery store or farmers' market</li> <li>Enjoying fresher and more flavorful food</li> </ul><h3>What to Eat Each Season</h3> <p>Fruits and vegetables have their own natural growing and production season. Familiarize yourself with what is in season before heading to the store or Farmers' Market. Here is a list of some produce to get you started:</p> <ul><li><strong>Winter:</strong> Brussels sprouts, cabbage, grape fruit, winter squash, pears, pumpkins, apples onion, oranges, leeks, and rutabagas</li> <li><strong>Spring:</strong> Spinach, asparagus, strawberries, apples, avocados, carrots, cabbage, garlic, collard greens, peas, lettuce, onions, and mushrooms</li> <li><strong>Summer:</strong> Bananas, eggplant, mangos, okra, peaches, apples, summer squash, tomatoes, and zucchini</li> <li><strong>Fall:</strong> Apples, beets, broccoli, green beans, sweet potatoes and yams, raspberries, winter squash, turnips, swiss chard, peas, kale, and cauliflower</li> </ul><h3><br /> Where Can I Shop Seasonal Produce?</h3> <p>Once you know which produce are in season, you can find it at the grocery store, your local farmers' market, shopping centers, and even gas stations! Keep a list of in-season produce for the current time of year and hang it on your fridge, keep it in your purse, or have a picture on your phone to reference. Shopping at your local farmers' market is a great way to further support your community and cut down on pollution from travel. Farmers sell seasonal fruit and vegetables, and they can be less expensive than the grocery store. As a bonus, you will have face-to-face contact with the person who farmed your produce. This gives you opportunity to ask them any questions you may have about their fruits and vegetables.</p> <p>Check out these links to learn about seasonal produce near you!</p> <p><a href="https://www.picktnproducts.org/seasonal.html" target="_blank">https://www.picktnproducts.org/seasonal.html</a></p> <p><a href="https://nashvillefunforfamilies.com/farmers-markets-in-nashville/" target="_blank">https://nashvillefunforfamilies.com/farmers-markets-in-nashville/</a></p> <p>Making these small changes to your diet can leave a lasting impact on your health, environment, and community.</p> <h3>Practice</h3> <p>Choose one current seasonal produce item to purchase on your next shopping trip. For an added challenge, research where a local farmers' market is. Make a visit and purchase your chosen produce from one of the local farmers.</p> <h3>Recipes</h3> <p><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/PDFs/hp/hpMashedSweetPotatoes.pdf">Mashed Sweet Potatoes</a><br /><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/PDFs/hp/hpVeggieBeanWrap.pdf">Veggie Bean Wraps</a></p> <h3>Helpful Resources</h3> <p><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/PDFs/hp/hpSeasonalShoppingList.pdf">Seasonal Shopping List</a></p> <h3>References:</h3> <ol><li>Macdiarmid, J.I. <a href="https://www.cambridge.org/core/services/aop-cambridge-core/content/view/08545F71A12EF0FE233E8D1DEFEF227A/S0029665113003753a.pdf/seasonality_and_dietary_requirements_will_eating_seasonal_food_contribute_to_health_and_environmental_sustainability.pdf" target="_blank" title="Seasonality and dietary requirements: Will eating seasonal food contribute to health and environmental sustainability?">Seasonality and dietary requirements: Will eating seasonal food contribute to health and environmental sustainability?</a> [PDF] Public Health Nutrition Research Group. Published November 21, 2013.</li> <li><a href="http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/HealthyEating/Nutrition/Seasonal-Produce---Fall-and-Winter_UCM_444862_Article.jsp#.XH1j_MBKhhE" target="_blank" title="Seasonal Produce – Fall and Winter">Seasonal Produce – Fall and Winter</a>. American Heart Association. Published February 1, 2017.</li> <li><a href="https://snaped.fns.usda.gov/seasonal-produce-guide" target="_blank" title="Seasonal Produce Guide">Seasonal Produce Guide</a>. Accessed March 4, 2019.</li> </ol></div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=223" hreflang="und">Healthy Eating</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=232" hreflang="und">Nutrition</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=260" hreflang="und">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=261" hreflang="und">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Wed, 07 Aug 2019 19:46:36 +0000 harnessg 3183 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Artificial Sweeteners: No Sugar-Coating https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/resource-articles/artificial-sweeteners-no-sugar-coating <span class="field--node--title">Artificial Sweeteners: No Sugar-Coating</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=173" hreflang="und">Living Healthy, Feeling Good</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=137" hreflang="und">Health Plus</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=139" hreflang="und">Resource Articles</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 08/01/2019 - 10:50</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3174" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Artificial Sweeteners: No Sugar-Coating"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Health Plus</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>There has been a lot of talk about artificial sweeteners in the past decade. Misinformation and general safety claims make it hard to determine if these sugar substitutes can be part of a healthy lifestyle. Read on for some sweet facts.</p> <h3>What are artificial sweeteners?</h3> <p>Artificial sweeteners are used in many foods and drinks as a sugar substitute. Most often they are used to reduce the calorie content of foods that would normally contain high amounts of sugar. They can also be used to add flavor, limit bacteria growth, and balance acidity in sauces. Unlike sugar, artificial sweeteners provide little to no energy (or calories) to the body. </p> <h3>What are popular artificial sweeteners?</h3> <p>Some popular artificial sweeteners include aspartame, sucralose, saccharin, and stevia. You may recognize these sweeteners by their more common brand names:</p> <ul><li>Aspartame, also known as Equal or NutraSweet, is 200 times sweeter than table sugar. It loses its sweetness when it is heated, so it is typically used to sweeten drinks. </li> <li>Sucralose, also known as Splenda, is 600 times sweeter than table sugar. It can be found in gum, frozen desserts, baked goods, and drinks.</li> <li>Saccharin, also known as Sweet'N Low, is 300 times sweeter than table sugar. It is used in diet foods and drinks, and it may have a bitter aftertaste in drinks.</li> <li>Stevia, also known as Truvia or PureVia, is 200 to 300 times sweeter than table sugar. It is made from a plant which is native to South America.</li> </ul><h3>What does research say about artificial sweeteners?</h3> <p>Since the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) began approving artificial sweeteners in 1958, there have been questions about their effects on overall health. You may have heard the rumors of studies showing that artificial sweeteners cause an increased risk for cancer. However, an investigation found flaws in early studies that showed a link between artificial sweeteners and cancer in rats. Further research has shown no clear evidence of a connection between artificial sweeteners and cancer in humans. In contrast, artificial sweeteners can help with weight loss and blood sugar control in people with diabetes. They can also help prevent dental decay.</p> <h3>What is the bottom line?</h3> <p>Carbohydrates, including sugar, are essential for everyday human functions. However, eating excess sugar can lead to weight gain and other health risks like type 2 diabetes and heart disease. The American Heart Association recommends certain limits to the amount of added sugar you consume per day. For women, no more than 6 teaspoons or 25 grams (100 calories). For men, the recommended limit is 9 teaspoons or 36 grams (150 calories). Artificial sweeteners are one option that can help you meet this recommendation.</p> <h3><strong>Practice </strong></h3> <p>Try to meet the recommendation for added sugar (6 teaspoons a day for women, 9 teaspoons a day for men) by limiting sugary foods and drinks or by substituting with artificial sweeteners.</p> <p><strong>Recipes</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/PDFs/hp/hpBananaPuddinginaCup.pdf" target="_blank" title="Banana Pudding in a Cup">Banana Pudding in a Cup</a><br /><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/PDFs/hp/hpPeanutButterPowerGranola.pdf" target="_blank" title="Peanut Butter Power Granola">Peanut Butter Power Granola</a></p> <h3><strong>Helpful Resources</strong></h3> <p><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/PDFs/hp/hpArtificialSweetenersHandout.pdf" target="_blank" title="Artificial Sweeteners Handout">Artificial Sweeteners Handout</a></p> <h3>References:</h3> <ol><li>Added Sugars. American Heart Association. <a href="https://www.heart.org/en/healthy-living/healthy-eating/eat-smart/sugar/added-sugars" target="_blank">https://www.heart.org/en/healthy-living/healthy-eating/eat-smart/sugar/added-sugars</a>. Reviewed April 17, 2018.</li> <li>Artificial Sweeteners and Cancer. National Cancer Institute. <a href="https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/diet/artificial-sweeteners-fact-sheet" target="_blank">https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/diet/artificial-sweeteners-fact-sheet</a>. Reviewed August 10, 2016.</li> <li>Cording Jessica. Looking to Reduce Your Family's Intake of Added Sugars? Here's How. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. <a href="https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/diet/artificial-sweeteners-fact-sheet" target="_blank">https://www.eatright.org/food/nutrition/dietary-guidelines-and-myplate/looking-to-reduce-your-familys-added-sugar-intake-heres-how</a>. Published July 31, 2018.</li> <li>High-Intensity Sweeteners. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. <a href="https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/diet/artificial-sweeteners-fact-sheet" target="_blank">https://www.fda.gov/food/food-additives-petitions/high-intensity-sweeteners</a>. Published May 19, 2014.</li> <li>Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Us of Nutritive and Nonnutritive Sweeteners. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. 2012;112(5): 739-758. doi: 10.1016/j.jand.2012.03.009.</li> <li>Wax Emily, Zieve David. MedlinePlus. Sweeteners-Sugar Substitutes. <a href="https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007492.htm" target="_blank">https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007492.htm</a>. Reviewed August 7, 2017.</li> </ol><p> </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=223" hreflang="und">Healthy Eating</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=232" hreflang="und">Nutrition</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=260" hreflang="und">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=261" hreflang="und">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Thu, 01 Aug 2019 15:50:59 +0000 harnessg 3174 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Down to the Root of Plant-Based Diets https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/resource-articles/down-root-plant-based-diets <span class="field--node--title">Down to the Root of Plant-Based Diets</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=173" hreflang="und">Living Healthy, Feeling Good</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?cat=137" hreflang="und">Health Plus</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 07/18/2019 - 14:51</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3171" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Down to the Root of Plant-Based Diets"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Health Plus</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>​A plant-based diet focuses mainly on eating fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, while limiting animal products such as meat and dairy. It is not an all-or-nothing approach. Think of it as plant-<em>focused</em>, which allows for flexibility. This lifestyle places importance on eating a variety of protein, fat, and carbohydrates from plant-based foods and benefiting from the many nutrients they provide. </p> <h3><strong>What are the benefits of a plant-based diet?</strong></h3> <p>Plant-based diets are proven to be extremely helpful in weight loss and are associated with lower Body Mass Index (BMI) scores. Plant foods require more energy to break down. The increased calorie burn can make maintaining a healthy weight easier. Eating more plant foods may also reduce your risk of heart disease. Research has shown plant-based diets help improve blood pressure, weight, blood glucose, and triglyceride levels. They can also reduce inflammation in the body. These risk reductions can all be achieved through the plant-based diet due to increased fiber. Another benefit is preventing and controlling diabetes. Research has shown that a plant-based diet can decrease the risk for type 2 diabetes by improving insulin sensitivity and decreasing insulin resistance.</p> <h3><strong>Are there any concerns around following a plant-based diet?</strong></h3> <p>Most concerns about a plant-based diet can be eased by focusing on eating certain foods. Here are a few specific nutrients to be mindful of along with where to find them:</p> <ul><li><strong>Protein:</strong> Many Americans rely on meats for their main source of protein, but enough protein can be found in a plant-based diet. Try to include plenty of these protein-rich meat alternatives in your daily diet: legumes (beans, peas, and lentils), soy products, nuts, and certain vegetables. </li> <li><strong>Iron, Vitamin B12, and Vitamin D:</strong> Following a plant-based diet can lead to low levels of these important nutrients, but fortified foods can help! Fortified foods have added nutrients that would not be present naturally. Commonly fortified foods include milk, cereals, orange juice, and grains labeled "fortified" on the packaging. You can calculate the proper amount of nutrients you need by following this link (<a href="https://fnic.nal.usda.gov/fnic/dri-calculator/" target="_blank">https://fnic.nal.usda.gov/fnic/dri-calculator/</a>) or by talking with a registered dietitian.</li> <li><strong>Calcium:</strong> If not eating dairy, it is possible to get enough calcium by drinking calcium fortified milk alternatives and eating calcium-rich plant foods, such as kale, turnip greens, Chinese cabbage, and bok choy. Talk to your doctor about whether a supplement may also be beneficial.</li> <li><strong>Water: </strong>Having a diet rich in plant foods may increase your fiber consumption, which provides numerous health benefits. To avoid digestive discomfort, increase your fiber intake gradually over time while also drinking more water. Aim to drink at least 8 cups of water per day. </li> </ul><p>Following a plant-based diet doesn't have to mean not eating meat. Eating more plant foods is proven to have several health benefits including reduced risk for heart disease and diabetes, as well as weight loss. </p> <h3><strong>Practice</strong></h3> <p>Try eating a plant-based diet one day this week. Experiment with foods, use your creative side, try new things, and make the majority of your nutrients come from plant foods. </p> <h3><strong>Recipes</strong></h3> <p><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/PDFs/hp/hpAvocadoChickpeaSalad.pdf" target="_blank">Avocado Chickpea Salad Wraps</a></p> <p><a files="" health-wellness="" hp="" hpmexicanquinoa.pdf="" href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/PDFs/hp/hpMexicanQuinoa.pdf" pdfs="" public_files="" sites="" target="_blank href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/%20vumc.org.health-wellness%3D"">Mexican Quinoa</a></p> <h3>References:</h3> <ol><li>Levitan EB, Gutierrez OM, Shikany JM, Safford MM, Judd SE, Rosenson RS. Plant based diet associated with less heart failure risk. Welcome to the AHA/ASA Newsroom | American Heart Association. <a href="http://newsroom.heart.org/news/plant-based-diet-associated-with-less-heart-failure-risk" target="_blank">http://newsroom.heart.org/news/plant-based-diet-associated-with-less-heart-failure-risk</a>. Published November 13, 2017.</li> <li>Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets. American Diabetes Association. <a href="http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/planning-meals/meal-planning-for-vegetarians/" target="_blank">http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/planning-meals/meal-planning-for-vegetarians/</a>. Published May 14, 2014.</li> <li>Melina V, Craig W, Levin S. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Vegetarian Diets. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. 2016;116(12):1970-1980. doi:10.1016/j.jand.2016.09.025</li> <li>Tuso P. Nutritional Update for Physicians: Plant-Based Diets. The Permanente Journal.2013;17(2):61-66. doi:10.7812/tpp/12-085</li> </ol></div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=223" hreflang="und">Healthy Eating</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=232" hreflang="und">Nutrition</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=260" hreflang="und">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/resource-articles?tag=261" hreflang="und">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Thu, 18 Jul 2019 19:51:09 +0000 harnessg 3171 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness