Resource Articles

Trauma and Storms: Coping with Disaster

The destruction of the December storms and tornados is heartbreaking. There is a feeling of being totally overwhelmed, hopelessness and helplessness. Jim Kendall, LCSW, of Vanderbilt Work/Life Connections-EAP gives an assessment of how to recognize symptoms of extreme stress, and how to help those affected by the recent tornadoes.

Post-Traumatic Stress Self-Assessment

When a person experiences, witnesses, or is confronted with an event or situation that involves actual or threatened death, serious injury, or a threat to the physical integrity of self or others, he or she can experience fear, helplessness, and horror.  PTSD results when effects of exposure to a traumatic event persist beyond one month following the event. Please answer "Yes" or "No" if you have been exposed to or witnessed a traumatic event and have engaged in or experienced any of the following over the past month on a fairly consistent basis.

Support Following the Death of an Employee

From time to time at Vanderbilt, one of the members of our faculty or staff dies or is seriously injured. The loss leaves co-workers or a group of colleagues to deal with their own personal grief. Work/Life Connections-EAP counselors can assist management by meeting with individuals and/or groups to provide support for the managers, faculty, and staff who are dealing with the impact of loss.
 
 Call Work/Life Connections-EAP at 615-936-1327 for support and psychological first aid assistance. ​

Depression

According to the National Institute on Mental Health, more than 22.1 million American adults suffer from depression annually. Of those suffering from depression, more than 80% can be treated successfully. Although depression is common, many people do not receive treatment for their illness because they do not recognize the symptoms which may include: