Blog RSS https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/ en #MeToo in the Workplace https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/wellcasts-wellcasts-worklifeconnections/metoo-workplace <span class="field--node--title">#MeToo in the Workplace</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=154" hreflang="en">Wellcasts</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=273" hreflang="en">Wellcasts - Work/Life Connections</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=155" hreflang="en">Work/Life Connections</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 04/16/2021 - 14:18</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3352" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to #MeToo in the Workplace"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Work/LIfe Connections</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p> <audio controls="" style="height: 54px;"><source src="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/Wellcasts/HW548.mp3" type="audio/mpeg"></source> Your browser does not support the audio element. <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/Wellcasts/HW548.mp3">Download </a> the file to your computer.</audio> </p> <p>​Heather Kamper from the VUMC SHARE Center talks about workplace misconduct and the reactions people have about it.</p> <h3>Begin Transcript</h3> <p>Rosemary Cope:  Welcome to this edition of the Vanderbilt Health and Wellness Wellcast.  I am Rosemary Cope with WorkLife Connections.  Our guest today is Heather Kamper.  A graduate of the University of Pittsburg, Heather is the new coordinator for the SHARE Center and is also a clinical counselor with our Employee Assistance Program.  April is sexual assault awareness month.  So, we thought we would look at concerns about sexual harassment in the workplace.  According to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission an estimated 75% of individuals who get harassed at work do not file a complaint.  The reasons are varied and complicated.  According to research firm Gartner about 60% of all misconduct observed in the workplace is never reported.  In the age of Me Too, it is helpful to look at the bigger picture.  Heather, would you give a brief definition of workplace misconduct so that we all know what the issue is?</p> <p>Heather Kamper:  Sure, Rosemary.  First, I want to say thanks so much for having me here and more importantly for bringing light to the shadow by dedicating your Wellcast to sexual harassment today.  According to the Human Resources Department here at VUMC, sexual harassment is defined very specifically as unwelcomed conduct of a sexual nature, unwelcomed sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and any other verbal or nonverbal conduct that is of a sexual nature.  You can think of it in broader categories such as physical sexual harassment, verbal sexual harassment, and nonverbal sexual harassment.  VUMC also has a clearly stated zero tolerance policy for sexual harassment.  I feel particularly empowered as a VUMC staff by this policy summary statement from human resources that says, our sexual harassment policy is to have a culture at VUMC where employees clearly define, prevent, and stop sexual harassment.  We will not tolerate sexual harassment in our workplace.  Our culture is based on mutual respect.  That is a powerful statement from our leaders and employer, Rosemary.  We are living and working in exciting times.  </p> <p>Rosemary Cope:  I agree, Heather.  I can think of all kinds of reasons people might not want to talk about this topic.  Would you enlighten us on why people stay silent?</p> <p>Heather Kamper:  Many people fear retaliation by the abuser or other witnesses in the workplace.  Of course, the fear of not being believed is an experience shared by many.  Many survivors talk about the role that shame and even self-blame play in staying silent.  Lack of access to supports such as friends or family that could encourage the survivor to speak out often worsens the isolation present in sexual harassment.  Another factor that can sometimes create additional barriers to disclosure is the power hierarchy that exists in society and within our own VUMC which is closely linked to fear of retaliation and not being believed.  </p> <p>Rosemary Cope:  I also know there are people who do tell about their experiences.  How is that beneficial to the person who does that?  </p> <p>Heather Kamper:  Powerful things can happen when we start to tell the story, Rosemary.  Many survivors have reported that they began the healing process when they first spoke up whether to a friend or supervisor or a confidential support like a therapist.  People who live through sexual harassment also indicate that it was at the moment they spoke out that they began to take their power back, if you will, from the person intimidating or causing them harm.  They began to own their rightful place in the workplace and the world again.  Survivors may report that they speak out so that they can benefit from resources and access support systems, which we know exists here at VUMC and at VU.  Some survivors report that they disclose to get feedback and ideas and the opportunity to know more about options for next steps.  I have always been particularly moved when a client tells me they reported, and they are speaking out to help protect others from experiencing the same form of harassment and abuse that they have experienced.  Finally, one significant reason why people speak out is to reduce the emotional, psychological, and often physical toll that holding the experience has had.</p> <p>Rosemary Cope:  So, if someone wants to take back that power that you talked about, Heather, and they would like to speak confidentially about this, how do they reach out to you?</p> <p>Heather Kamper:  For any staff person at VUMC, our newest program in Health and Wellness is available for those who have experienced or witnessed sexual harassment and needs support.  It is called the SHARE Center and we have only recently celebrated our first birthday.  SHARE stands for sexual harassment, awareness, response, and education.  SHARE has been regularly participating in ongoing efforts at VUMC to ensure equity, safety, and respect across the enterprise through individual counseling and departmental consultations and even educational presentations.  We serve a unique role in the VUMC system and as a result we are able to ensure that information about sexual harassment shared with me or any other staff person in a counseling session within SHARE will be held as confidential.  We are here to be patient, knowledgeable, empowering and understanding listeners.  If you would like to contact the SHARE Center, VUMC staff, faculty or Allied Health professionals can give us a call at the Work/Life Connections-EAP phone line at 615-936-1327 and let our staff know that you would like to make an appointment with a SHARE provider.  The SHARE Center is located in the basement of the Medical Arts Building in Suite 010.  We are open from Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. If you need more information, you can look at the SHARE Center's website at VUMC.org/health-wellness/SHARE-Center.  Thanks, Rosemary.  </p> <p>Rosemary Cope:  Thank you, Heather, for enlightening us about this important center and giving out great information to all of our employees here at Vanderbilt.  </p> <p>Thank you all for listening.  If you have a story suggestion, please use the Contact Us page on our website at <a href="http://www.vumc.org/health-wellness">www.vumc.org/health-wellness</a>.</p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=200" hreflang="en">Counseling</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=230" hreflang="en">Mental Health</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=234" hreflang="en">Personal Safety</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=260" hreflang="en">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=261" hreflang="en">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 16 Apr 2021 19:18:19 +0000 harnessg 3352 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Exercise Your Way https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/wellcasts-wellcasts-health-plus/exercise-your-way <span class="field--node--title">Exercise Your Way</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=154" hreflang="en">Wellcasts</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=274" hreflang="en">Wellcasts - Health Plus</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=137" hreflang="en">Health Plus</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 04/09/2021 - 14:15</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3351" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Exercise Your Way"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Health Plus</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>​Join Sarah Hendricks, Athletic Trainer at the Vanderbilt Orthopedic Institute, as she shares a timely reminder to exercise your way and how goal setting can help you stay motivated. You’ll find 3 simple ways to help you start exercising today!  </p> <p><a href="https://redcap.vanderbilt.edu/surveys/?s=ELPLCCT4DC" target="_blank"><strong>View Wellcast</strong></a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=260" hreflang="en">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=261" hreflang="en">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 09 Apr 2021 19:15:51 +0000 harnessg 3351 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness The Dangers of Distracted Driving in Teens https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/wellcasts-wellcasts-occupational-health-clinic/dangers-distracted-driving-teens <span class="field--node--title">The Dangers of Distracted Driving in Teens</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=154" hreflang="en">Wellcasts</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=272" hreflang="en">Wellcasts - Occupational Health Clinic</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=138" hreflang="en">Occupational Health Clinic</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 04/02/2021 - 13:16</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3339" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to The Dangers of Distracted Driving in Teens"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Occupational Health Clinic</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p> <audio controls="" style="height: 54px;"><source src="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/Wellcasts/HW511.mp3" type="audio/mpeg"></source> Your browser does not support the audio element. <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/Wellcasts/HW511.mp3">Download </a> the file to your computer.</audio> </p> <p>Ms. Purnima Unni, Manager of the Pediatric Trauma Injury Prevention Program at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt, discusses the hazards of distracted driving in teens and strategies for prevention. </p> <p><a href="https://www.childrenshospitalvanderbilt.org/program/teen-driver-safety" target="_blank">VUMC Teen Driver Safety Program</a></p> <p><a href="https://www.childrenshospitalvanderbilt.org/information/distracted-driving-facts-and-stats" target="_blank">Distracted Driving Facts and Stats</a></p> <h3>Begin Transcript</h3> <p>Welcome to this edition of the Vanderbilt Health and Wellness wellcast.  I'm Shaina Farfel with Occupational Health.  Today, we are speaking with Purnima Unni, manager of the Pediatric Trauma Injury Prevention Program at the Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt.  Purnima, thanks so much for being with us today.</p> <p>Purnima Unni:  Thank you for having me.</p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  Getting your drivers license as a teenager is sort of a rite of passage, but with this newfound freedom comes a fair amount of risk, especially in the age of cell phones and other electronic devices.  Since April is National Distracted Driving Awareness month, I wanted to discuss distracted driving as it relates to teenagers, sort of our youngest and most inexperienced drivers out on the roads.  What are the most common types of distracted driving in teens and are teens more likely to engage in distracted driving than adults?</p> <p>Purnima Unni:  Yeah.  It's a great question.  So, I think, first, it is really important that we understand what distracted driving is.  So, distracted driving is anythingthat takes your eyes away from the task of driving.  So, that can include anything from texting and driving to passengers in the car to putting your makeup on to turning the phone.  So, all that kind of stuff falls in the realm of distracted driving.  When we talk about the most common distractions with teens, we are usually talking about, A, the phones.  So, there is a constant need among teens to stay connected.  So, they are always on the phone texting and getting in touch with their friends.  So, phones is a big distraction.  Friends.  A big part of driving, again, is the ability to carry your friends around when you are a teen.  There is a lot of research that shows that with every additional passenger a teen has in their car, the risk of a crash kind of goes up.  Then, music.  Music is a huge factor.  You know, they have their playlists and they are always wanting to change the playlist.  So, all of these are huge factors when it comes to common distractions among teens.  So, you asked the other question about, you know, is it more dangerous, an adult or a teen, and the reality is that car wrecks are the leading cause of fatality and death for U.S. teens.  It is especially true with newly licensed drivers.  They are four times, believe it or not, more likely to get into a wreck than any other age group.  So, teenagers are deeply connected with their phones and you add on the risk of a new driver.  It kind of makes it more riskier than an adult driver.</p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  What are the laws around distracted driving here in the state of Tennessee?</p> <p>Purnima Unni:  Interestingly enough, believe it or not, in 2018, there were over 24,000 crashes involving a distracted driver right here in Tennessee.  So, we are very excited that Tennessee actually has a hands-free Tennessee law.  It had gone into effect on July 1, 2019.  So, the law does state that if you are over 18, then you are not supposed to hold a phone in your hand or have it anywhere close to your body, that you are not supposed to write or send a text message out.  You can't even reach for a cell phone.  You are allowed to use a GPS device, but it has to be mounted at all times, and of course, you can use ... like, hands-free devices are allowed, so, you know, earphones/ear buds.  Now, if you are a driver under 18 and you're newly licensed in that restricted phase or intermediate restricted phase, you are actually not even supposed to be on the phone at all.  That's just part of their graduated driver licensing law - no phones allowed at all.  So, that's something parents have to be kind of aware of and talk to their child about, and obviously, role modeling plays a huge role in all of this.</p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  Sure, and just circling back, so, you had mentioned some of these already, but what are the hazards associated with distracted driving and why is it important to prevent it?</p> <p>Purnima Unni:  Yeah.  So, when you look, or think about it, it's really the statistics are really shocking, and I pulled some numbers just so that, you know, our listeners are kind of aware because I think sometimes data speaks volumes.  So, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 3,000 people are killed by the distracted driving alone in 2017, and according to the Centers for Disease Control, nine people are killed and more than 1,000 injured daily ... DAILY as a result of distracted driving.  So, it goes without saying that distracted driving can have really devastating effects, from fatal injuries where, you know, you lose a loved one, or you actually can cause the death of a loved one, to you getting involved in a serious injury where it can affect your whole life.</p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  It can be really devastating, and so that's why it is so important to talk about this today.  You know, a lot of parents out there might be wondering what they might be able to do to keep their children safe from distracted driving.</p> <p>Purnima Unni:  That's a great question.  You know, I have one who is 18 and one who is 21, and I know this can be a really scary time for parents if you have a newly-licensed driver or even if you have one who has been riding on the road for a while.  So, we will always recommend - be a good role model.  You know, if you are out there with your child in the car, and that starts early on, put your seatbelts on and put your phones away.  The message can wait.  There is nothing more precious than you and your family that you are carrying around.  Make sure if you have a teen who is a new driver, that you are kind of aware of the Tennessee Graduated Driver Licensing Law.  There are several components to it as far as when they can drive, how many passengers they can drive, whether they can use their phone ... so, all good advice that you should be aware of as they are going through that phase.  There are a lot of good parent-teen driving agreements out right now, where you can kind of sit with your teen and lay out what is expected of them in that learning phase, and don't be afraid, you know, to actually follow up and enforce it if they don't follow a rule that they were supposed to.  Make sure you are able to enforce it, and if there is a punishment involved, there is a punishment involved, because that's how they are going to learn as they go on the roadways.  Encourage them, really, if they have a phone, to use the "do not disturb" option on their phone, because what happens is they are going to be tempted if they see that light flashing, or, you know, hear some message coming on.  If you put that "do not disturb" application on your phone, then they are not even going to hear it until they reach their destination.  So, you can reassure them that none of their messages are going to be lost, but it's just making sure that they are not on the phone while in the car.</p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  Can you tell us a little bit about the Teen Driver Safety Program here at Vanderbilt or any other resources that you may be aware of that are available to parents and teens around middle Tennessee?</p> <p>Purnima Unni:  Yeah.  So, we are very excited.  In 2011, we started our "Be in the Zone - Turn off your Phone" teen driver safety initiative, and we are ever so grateful to the Allstate Foundation and Ford Fund for actually supporting our program since 2011, believe it or not, and the idea behind that program is to really encourage or increase awareness among teens about distracted driving and safe driving.  So, it is kind of a unique hospital-school partnership.  So, what we do is we partner with schools in high-risk counties that we have seen in Tennessee.  We encourage them to send some of their youth into our hospital.  We run like a six-hour program with the teens on kind of all the different aspects of being involved in the crash, from the ED to PT to just hearing from an individual who has been impacted as a result of a motor vehicle crash, and then, these teens become our champions of change.  They go out into their schools and run a year-long anti-texting-while-driving campaign where they are kind of motivating positive change in their peers.  So, this year, for example, we have 14 high schools across 12 counties participating, and we have reached more than 101 schools and more than 100,000 students since we started the program in 2011.  So, definitely come to our website.  You can just go to Vanderbilt Children's Hospital/Injury Prevention and it will take you to our Teen Driver Safety page, and the page has other information as well on it so that parents can kind of start this conversation with their teen.</p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  Yeah.  It sounds like a wonderful, novel program.</p> <p>Purnima Unni:  Yeah, we've had a wonderful opportunity to do that and touch as many families as we can, and like we always say in our world, even if you can change one person's life, that's a huge deal for us.</p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  Absolutely.  Well, thank you so much for sharing this valuable information.  I think we can all relate to these concerns and it's important for teenagers and adults alike to have an increased awareness and, you know, their own strategy for how to limit distractions while driving.  So, thank you.</p> <p>Purnima Unni:  Thank you so much for having me.</p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  Have a wonderful day.</p> <p>Purnima Unni:  Thank you.</p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  Thanks for listening.  If you have a story suggestion, you can use the "Contact Us" page on our website at <a href="http://www.vumc.org/health-wellness">www.vumc.org/health-wellness</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=237" hreflang="en">Prevention</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=242" hreflang="en">Risk Reduction</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=260" hreflang="en">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=261" hreflang="en">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 02 Apr 2021 18:16:57 +0000 harnessg 3339 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Small Changes, Better Sleep https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/wellcasts-wellcasts-health-plus/small-changes-better-sleep <span class="field--node--title">Small Changes, Better Sleep</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=154" hreflang="en">Wellcasts</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=274" hreflang="en">Wellcasts - Health Plus</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=137" hreflang="en">Health Plus</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 03/12/2021 - 14:13</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3350" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Small Changes, Better Sleep"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Health Plus</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>​Join Madeleine Hallum, Registered Dietitian and Clinical Nutrition Coordinator, as she shares a key to better health that might surprise you coming from a dietitian. Learn small, practical changes you can make to get a better night’s sleep. </p> <p><a href="https://redcap.vanderbilt.edu/surveys/?s=4RH9EM3RNP" target="_blank"><strong>View Wellcast</strong></a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=260" hreflang="en">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=261" hreflang="en">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 12 Mar 2021 20:13:56 +0000 harnessg 3350 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Follow Your Heart https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/wellcasts-wellcasts-health-plus/follow-your-heart <span class="field--node--title">Follow Your Heart</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=154" hreflang="en">Wellcasts</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=274" hreflang="en">Wellcasts - Health Plus</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=137" hreflang="en">Health Plus</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 02/12/2021 - 14:11</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3349" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Follow Your Heart"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Health Plus</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>​Join Dr. Daniel Muñoz, Executive Medical Director of the Vanderbilt Heart &amp; Vascular Institute, as he shares why heart health is so important right now and actions you can take to Follow Your Heart. </p> <p><a href="https://redcap.vanderbilt.edu/surveys/?s=4YXWLPYHYE" target="_blank"><strong>View Wellcast</strong></a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=260" hreflang="en">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=261" hreflang="en">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 12 Feb 2021 20:11:12 +0000 harnessg 3349 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Hand Dermatitis in Healthcare Workers https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/wellcasts-wellcasts-occupational-health-clinic/hand-dermatitis-healthcare-workers <span class="field--node--title">Hand Dermatitis in Healthcare Workers</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=154" hreflang="en">Wellcasts</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=272" hreflang="en">Wellcasts - Occupational Health Clinic</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=138" hreflang="en">Occupational Health Clinic</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 02/05/2021 - 14:06</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3348" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Hand Dermatitis in Healthcare Workers"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Occupational Health Clinic</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p> <audio controls="" style="height: 54px;"><source src="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/Wellcasts/HW540.mp3" type="audio/mpeg"></source> Your browser does not support the audio element. <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/Wellcasts/HW540.mp3">Download </a> the file to your computer.</audio> </p> <p>​Dr. Aleta Simmons, Assistant Professor of Dermatology, and coordinator of the Skin of Color Clinic in the Department of Dermatology at Vanderbilt discusses hand dermatitis, a condition common to healthcare workers who frequently wash their hands.</p> <h3>Begin Transcript</h3> <p>Shaina Farfel:  Welcome to this edition of the Vanderbilt Health and Wellness Wellcast.  I am Shaina Farfel with Occupational Health.  Today, I am speaking we are speaking with Dr. Aleta Simmons, Assistant Professor of Dermatology, who also helps to run and coordinate the Skin of Color Clinic here at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.  Dr. Simmons, thanks so much for being with us today.</p> <p>Dr. Aleta Simmons:  Thank you for having me.  </p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  As we are approaching winter when a lot of us struggle with dry, itchy and irritated skin and for our medical professionals who are washing their hands constantly throughout the day and probably even more so during the pandemic and for whom this can become an even greater challenge, I wanted to focus on a skin condition known as hand dermatitis that we see a lot in the occupational setting.  Can you tell me, what is hand dermatitis and what causes it?</p> <p>Dr. Aleta Simmons:  When people typically come in with hand dermatitis, they usually have signs of dry, scaly, or chapped skin on the hands.  They may see redness or even dark brown areas of irritated skin.  It is often particularly itchy.  Patients may have blisters or even fissures in the skin.  It typically effects the palms or the fingers or the fingertips or a combination of those.  Patients may also say, those cracks are bleeding, or they find that they have weeping, and usually in adults it is caused by an exposure to a chemical or something that they are handling with their hands at their job.  Often times, people who have a history of atopic dermatitis or what we commonly call eczema, they can be more prone to develop hand dermatitis as well.  To keep it plain, an itchy rash, it maybe red or scaly or both, that appears on the hands that causes patients a lot of itching.  </p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  You touched on this a bit, but any other populations that maybe at increased risk for this condition specifically?</p> <p>Dr. Aleta Simmons:  Definitely.  In terms of occupations, people who work with cleaning material.  The staff at our hospital that do janitorial work, cement workers, and people who work with paper can also often get dermatitis to that or we also call dermatitis like eczema or rash.  People who work in factories, they are often wearing gloves for long periods of time.  People who wash their hands frequently, like you said before, the wet-to-dry cycle washing the hands and drying the hands often leads to irritation because our skin has a barrier, and once you break that barrier down with dryness and cracking in the skin, things that we handle can often get into the skin, we become sensitive to it and are more likely to develop a rash from it.  We also cannot leave out kids.  One example is children that like to play with slime and if they already have a history of eczema, the things in the slim can often cause them a rash.</p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  We talked about signs and symptoms a little bit.  I did not know if you wanted to expand on that at all in terms of what folks may see that may guide them to know to come and be seen in the clinic and things to look out for.  </p> <p>Dr. Aleta Simmons:  Typically, people will try things at home before they present to the clinic.  By the time we see them, they have had hand dermatitis for a while and now it is affecting their day-to-day life.  Patients say, I can no longer work comfortably.  I am miserable.  What can I do?  At that point, we have to take a history in terms of what are they exposed to at work, what do they do at home, what are their hobbies.  Bakers, those that work or people who do it often at home, can sometimes get a hand dermatitis too.  We really need to know what patients are doing in their jobs and outside of their jobs because that is going to be key to treating them.  Patients often come in and say, I am a babysitter, I watch kids frequently or I work in a daycare.  We want to know, are you using wipes, how often are you washing your hands.  Those types of questions are very important.  When patients usually present to us, we are doing some investigative work to find out what they may be in contact with in order to stop one, the irritation and the itching in the skin, calm down the inflammation to try to get their hands to heal.</p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  Once you do that investigation and history, what are some of the recommended treatments for the condition?</p> <p>Dr. Aleta Simmons:  One great start for patients is doing patch testing.  We need to see what the patient is allergic to and this entails using allergens or common things that people are allergic to in terms of what they are using based on their history and also getting information from their employer about what types of chemicals they are exposed to at work.  We use that to place patches of those allergens on the patient's back and this is done over a course of a week where we see the patient three times to place the patches, look at the patches mid-week on a Wednesday and then look at them again on a Friday in order to see if they have had an allergic reaction to anything.  Once we find out if a patient is allergic to a substance, we then can go into a database for contact allergens and give patients a list of things that they can use that do not have those chemicals or other items in them that should not cause them a rash.  Also, patients that work at factories or even bakeries, they do paper or woodwork, we need to know what types of gloves can be accessible to them at their jobs.  Because often times we will have people wear cotton gloves, the cotton gloves will absorb any moister from sweating or heat that they may work with and then put another type of glove over that in order to protect them from the chemicals they are using.  Because the type of glove may matter because some chemicals can seep through particular types of gloves depending on what they are allergic to or what they use at work.  Another thing that is really important is barrier repair.  As I said in eczema, the skin barrier has been injured, so we need to try to support it and help it heal.  Moisturization, white petrolatum, a moisturizer such as Vanicream that does not have too many allergens in it is going to be helpful for that barrier repair.  Then, we need to treat the inflammation, so we use topical steroids or even nonsteroidal medications to get the inflammation down.  If those things do not work, we may have to do other treatments like phototherapy or oral medications.</p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  For some of our workers who maybe most at risk for this condition, what are some recommendations in terms of prevention prior to symptom onset?</p> <p>Dr. Aleta Simmons:  Patients with atopic dermatitis may want to meet with their doctors even as early as teenage years to think about what they may want to do for a career because this may impact their life as they are more susceptible to developing hand dermatitis.  That is the biggest part of prevention, but some patients may not think about that.  They are already in a profession that they love, and they have developed hand dermatitis.  It is important that they work with their dermatologist to come up with a plan to treat their dermatitis and to also prevent it from recurring.  </p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  Well, Dr. Simmons, thank you so much for sharing your expertise with us today.  I think we have a lot of employees, certainly cooks, hospital workers, and daycare providers, who I think could probably benefit a lot from this information and we truly appreciate your time today.  Thanks again.   </p> <p>Dr. Aleta Simmons:  Thank you for having me.</p> <p>Shaina Farfel: Thanks for listening.  If you have a story suggestion, you can use the "Contact Us" page on our website at <a href="http://www.vumc.org/health-wellness.         &amp;nbsp">www.vumc.org/health-wellness.         &amp;nbsp</a>;  </p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=228" hreflang="en">Medical Care</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=237" hreflang="en">Prevention</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=260" hreflang="en">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=261" hreflang="en">VUMC</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=266" hreflang="en">Work Injury and Exposures</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 05 Feb 2021 20:06:14 +0000 harnessg 3348 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Having Compassion Amidst Holiday Stress https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/wellcasts-wellcasts-health-plus/having-compassion-amidst-holiday-stress <span class="field--node--title">Having Compassion Amidst Holiday Stress</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=154" hreflang="en">Wellcasts</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=274" hreflang="en">Wellcasts - Health Plus</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=137" hreflang="en">Health Plus</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 12/11/2020 - 08:25</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3324" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Having Compassion Amidst Holiday Stress"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Health Plus</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>​Can holiday stress occasionally get the better of you? Join Stephanie Dean, Assistant Manager of Work/Life Connections-EAP, as she shares how to have compassion with ourselves and others during these unusual, divisive, and stressful times.</p> <p><a href="https://redcap.vanderbilt.edu/surveys/?s=KYDDRC4LK9" target="_blank"><strong>View Wellcast</strong></a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=260" hreflang="en">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=261" hreflang="en">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 11 Dec 2020 14:25:11 +0000 harnessg 3324 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Save Your Sleep - Tips for Better ZZZs https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/wellcasts-wellcasts-health-plus/save-your-sleep-tips-better-zzzs <span class="field--node--title">Save Your Sleep - Tips for Better ZZZs</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=154" hreflang="en">Wellcasts</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=274" hreflang="en">Wellcasts - Health Plus</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=137" hreflang="en">Health Plus</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 11/13/2020 - 01:18</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3307" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Save Your Sleep - Tips for Better ZZZs"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Health Plus</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Are you feeling tired from poor sleep? Sleep challenges because of the global pandemic are more common than ever before. Dr. Beth Malow shares her sleep expertise on why this is happening and what we can do to promote good sleep.</p> <p><a href="https://redcap.vanderbilt.edu/surveys/?s=7RWY4WW8TY" target="_blank">Watch Now!</a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=246" hreflang="en">Sleep</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=260" hreflang="en">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=261" hreflang="en">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 13 Nov 2020 07:18:49 +0000 harnessg 3307 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Ergonomics While Working from Home https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/wellcasts-wellcasts-occupational-health-clinic/ergonomics-while-working-home <span class="field--node--title">Ergonomics While Working from Home</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=154" hreflang="en">Wellcasts</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=272" hreflang="en">Wellcasts - Occupational Health Clinic</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=138" hreflang="en">Occupational Health Clinic</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 11/06/2020 - 13:59</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3347" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Ergonomics While Working from Home"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Occupational Health Clinic</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p> <audio controls="" style="height: 54px;"><source src="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/Wellcasts/HW531.mp3" type="audio/mpeg"></source> Your browser does not support the audio element. <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/Wellcasts/HW531.mp3">Download </a> the file to your computer.</audio> </p> <p>​We speak with Wilma Traughber, Ergonomics Program Manager at the VUMC Occupational Health Clinic, about tips and tricks for preventing injuries while working from home.</p> <h3>Begin Transcript</h3> <p>Shaina Farfel:  Welcome to this edition of the Vanderbilt Health and Wellness Wellcast.  I am Shaina Farfel with Occupational Health.  Today, I am speaking with Wilma Traughber, Ergonomics Program Manager at the Occupational Health Clinic.  Wilma, thanks so much for being with us today.  </p> <p>Wilma Traughber:  Well, thank you for inviting me Shaina.  </p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  Absolutely.  I wanted to discuss working from home since so many of us are doing that these days and we all may not have the ideal set up.  I thought you could give us some tips and tricks for our staff members to keep them safe while working at home, so they do not get injured.  Can you tell us first off, what is ergonomics and why is it important?</p> <p>Wilma Traughber:  Ergonomics is the science of fitting the workplace conditions and the job demands to the ability of the worker.  It is important because it increases the worker's comfort, it lessens the risk of injury and it makes the job easier.  So, the employee is working smarter, not harder.</p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  What would you say are some of the most common ergonomic-related mistakes that people make when working from home?  </p> <p>Wilma Traughber:  When you are at home, you feel more relaxed.  You may be less posture aware and you might use a laptop computer at a kitchen table or a dining room table not realizing that maybe perhaps the keying surface is too high.  You might use a laptop while you are sitting on the couch or lying in bed which may cause poor posture in relation to the head, neck, wrists, or hands.  Some other mistakes that we typically make when we are working at home and we are in that relaxed environment, because there is no place like home, we might decide that maybe we will not take a break or we do not set a routine work schedule and we maybe even actually working more hours than usual.  We might work unusual work hours, thus, interfering with our sleep cycle and thus affecting our work-life balance.  </p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  So, as you say these things, I am thinking I have done a lot of these things at home.  So, a lot to consider there.  Just given all of this, what are some things that we should take into consideration when we are setting up a home office to do work at home?</p> <p>Wilma Traughber:  The main object of setting up your home office is posture first.  Try to make an attempt to replicate as many elements as possible from your on-site work office at home.  It can take some creativity, but it can be done pretty inexpensively.  Also, take inventory of the equipment that may be needed to perform your job properly at home.  Examples would be, you need to borrow your keyboard from work or your mouse from work or some document holders that you might have at work that you might want to bring home.  You also want to assign a dedicated workspace in your home, and then a good work setup is really important.  For example, maintaining good head and neck posture.  When you are working from laptops, depending on where that laptop is placed and how it is placed, like for instance in your lap, it might cause you to flex your head forward.  Laptops are great when you are using them for a short amount of time, but if you are going to be working an extended amount of time on a laptop, you may want to put that laptop on a laptop holder or stand, so that the monitor is at eye level or you can stack books so that monitor is at eye level.  Another tip would be you definitely want, regardless of whether it is a laptop or a PC, you want that monitor directly in front of you.  Hand and wrist posture.  Definitely using that external keyboard or mouse when you are using a laptop to maintain good mutual hand posture.  You want to make sure that the height of your table or your chair is at the right height.  You may have to move your keyboard or mouse closer or father away from your body or you may need to adjust the height of your table or chair to maintain good hand and wrist posture.  One tip is to make sure that your forearm is parallel to the floor and then that will give you the right height for keying and mouse use.  Seated position or just being seated at home, you want to find the right posture or the posture that creates comfort for you and provides lower back support and also allows you to view the computer screen properly.  So, if you do not have lumbar support adjustment in your chair at home, you can use a rolled towel for back support.  For petite individuals, they may want to use a footrest to help with their seated posture.  The other thing that we want to look at is just basic work habits.  You can definitely practice taking your breaks.  Every 20 to 30 minutes, you want to take a quick break even if it is standing up, stretching, or taking a quick walk.  You also want to prevent eye fatigue.  One way that you can prevent eye fatigue is practicing the 20/20/20 rule.  The 20/20/20 rule is you want to take a 20 second break looking away from your monitor every 20 minutes and during that break you want to focus your eyes on an object 20 feet away from your monitor.  You can also use like smart devices to set reminders for you to take your breaks.   </p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  These are wonderful ideas, Wilma.  They seem relatively inexpensive and simple and easy for people to adopt.  That is wonderful.  What ergonomic resources are available at Vanderbilt for faculty and staff members?</p> <p>Wilma Traughber:  Well, for those folks who work in an office environment or even working from home, we have the Vanderbilt Online Tutorial for Ergonomics.  We call it VOTE, so if you have not voted, go to the VUMC Learning Exchange and just search for VOTE.  The great part about our VOTE module is it is a great tool to help you set up your work station, it provides examples on how to adjust your chair, visual cues with regard to hand placement, keyboard and mouse height, and chair and monitor placement.  And, of course, in a time of social distancing, we provide telemed ergonomic consultations and we can also provide training virtually.  We also have jobs specific ergonomic trainings on the VUMC Learning Exchange for laboratory workers, ultrasound employees.  We also have trainings for patient handing and general ergonomics.  </p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  Well, thank you so much for your time and for sharing your expertise with us.  I am sure our eyes and our backs will be thanking you in the future.  So, thank you for joining us.</p> <p>Wilma Traughber:  Thank you.  </p> <p>Shaina Farfel: Thanks for listening.  If you have a story suggestion, you can use the "Contact Us" page on our website at <a href="http://www.vumc.org/health-wellness.&amp;nbsp">www.vumc.org/health-wellness.&amp;nbsp</a>;</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=210" hreflang="en">Ergonomics</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=211" hreflang="en">Exercise</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=237" hreflang="en">Prevention</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=260" hreflang="en">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=261" hreflang="en">VUMC</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=267" hreflang="en">Work Injury/Illness Care</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=266" hreflang="en">Work Injury and Exposures</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 06 Nov 2020 19:59:16 +0000 harnessg 3347 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Finding Joy in Hard Times https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/wellcasts-wellcasts-worklifeconnections/finding-joy-hard-times <span class="field--node--title">Finding Joy in Hard Times</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=154" hreflang="en">Wellcasts</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=155" hreflang="en">Work/Life Connections</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=273" hreflang="en">Wellcasts - Work/Life Connections</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 10/16/2020 - 07:57</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3326" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Finding Joy in Hard Times"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Work/Life Connections</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p> <audio controls="" style="height: 54px;"><source src="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/Wellcasts/HW530.mp3" type="audio/mpeg"></source> Your browser does not support the audio element. <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/Wellcasts/HW530.mp3">Download </a> the file to your computer.</audio> </p> <p>​An exploration of practicing joy in our lives, even when circumstances are difficult.</p> <p><a href="https://thehappinesstrap.com/free-resources/" target="_blank">The Happiness Trap - Free Resources</a></p> <h3>Begin Transcript</h3> <p>Rosemary Cope:  Welcome to this edition of the Vanderbilt Health and Wellness wellcast.  I'm Rosemary Cope with Work/Life Connections.  Our guest today is Mary Clare Champion.  Mary Clare is a Clinical Psychologist at the Vanderbilt University Counseling Center.  Thanks for joining us today, Mary Clare.<br /> Dr. Mary Clare Champion:  My pleasure.  Thank you for having me.<br /> Rosemary Cope:  Absolutely.  You know, listeners, I don't know about you, but I sure could use some more joy these days.  In these trying times, one can easily lose sight of joy, hope and happiness, and when the world feels like it is spiraling out of control, and all semblance of normalcy seems to be lost, holding on to positive feelings can feel like an overwhelming task.  But things don't have to be ultimately, insanely terrible for you to feel this way.  Any kind of challenging time can make you feel down and blue, resulting in symptoms of depression, anxiety, and other mood-related issues.  You can become unproductive, feel demotivated or just lose your spark.  Why does this happen and what can you do to fix it?  Do you ever notice that some folks always seem to have their chins up, even on the worst of days?  It's a valuable trait and it's also one that most people learn with time as a skill.  And if you are interested in learning how to do this, it's all about changing your mindset and keeping healthy habits.  Mary Clare, what is your definition of joy and is it different than happiness?<br />  <br /> Dr. Mary Clare Champion:  So, joy, I think, is absolutely different than happiness.  We have, unfortunately, come to expect happiness as a chronic, set place that we feel happy in a general way all the time, kind of crowding out the possibility to feel other things, and that's just really not realistic in a long-term way.  And so, happiness ... I think about happiness as being almost a place to be and a place where we expect ourselves to be, or a way to be, versus joy, being something that we can find a way to experience or be able to identify in some way.  And so, while we might not be particularly happy, we can still find ways to experience and notice and identify joy.<br />  <br /> Rosemary Cope:  Would I be correct in saying that sometimes happiness is dependent upon things that are going on around us, but joy is something that we can carry with us regardless?<br />  <br /> Dr. Mary Clare Champion:  Yes, absolutely.  And so, we might have external factors that we're looking for to support a sense of happiness, and some of those external factors might be totally beyond our control.  And so, in an unfortunate and potentially unintentional way, we limit our ability to have that sense of feeling happy, noticing that happiness really isn't our baseline state.  To expect ourselves to be happy all the time or to have happiness as an expected baseline way of being really isn't all that realistic, versus joy is something that we do have more ability to control or name or locate or produce for ourselves in some way.<br />  <br /> Rosemary Cope:  Makes perfect sense.  And there is research done by psychologist, Barbara Fredrickson, among others, that suggests that feeling joy during a stressful time actually challenges the negative cardiovascular effects of stress on the body, and that people who experience positive emotions amid adversity, they cope better and they are more resilient in the face of future problems, but we know we can't be happy all the time.  Sometimes, joy just goes missing.  We're human, after all, but we're wise enough to understand that we rarely have a perfect balance of well-being in all aspects of our life, and sometimes, the scales tip in a way that just makes reclaiming our joy difficult.  So, Mary Clare, can you tell us what you would suggest for people to consider doing to offset the stress of our daily lives, and how do we reclaim that joy?  And are there resiliency practices that we could use when things seem to be difficult?</p> <p>Dr. Mary Clare Champion:  Sure!  I think it's, in some ways, it's a very personalized process.  So, what I might encourage someone to do is really think about for themselves - where have they noticed joy before?  What are the things that bring them joy, the people that bring them comfort, the activities that bring them joy, because if I necessarily listed the things that were pertinent or relevant to me, they might not be relevant to everybody else.  And so, one of the things that I also, which this might sound a little bit counterintuitive, but to be able to notice joy, to actually allow yourself space to identify the range of emotion.  I always call upon one of the last scenes of the Pixar masterpiece, Inside Out, where all of, you know, so much of the movie is based around joy, Amy Poehler, trying to avoid and crowd out these other emotions that are potentially difficult or not as pleasant, and, at the end of the movie, when they actually roll back one of the memories that had been kind of colored yellow for joy, when they roll back the memory, they notice that it started blue.  They notice that it started with sadness.  And when that character, when Riley allowed herself to experience the sadness, there were people that came to her and comforted her, and that comfort brought joy, and all of the sudden, the memories swirled.  And so, to think about these emotions as being really isolated, siloed kind of experiences, I think, would be a misunderstanding.  But in terms of finding joy, I think it has to be, or it can work to be a practice that you actually do practice, that you are conscious about trying to identify something in your day that brought you joy, whatever it might be.  It can be very simple things.  I could be keeping a gratitude journal.  And so, these could be from large events or bigger events or small things that we make, just make the effort to notice.  Does it mean that we are going to ignore the things that are going on that are difficult or challenging?  Absolutely not.</p> <p>Rosemary Cope:  I love the Inside Out.  That's such a great movie and it tells us a lot about our own emotions, and I don't care how old you are, it is relevant.</p> <p>Dr. Mary Clare Champion:  It is absolutely a movie for adults masquerading in a cartoon.</p> <p>Rosemary Cope:   Absolutely.  So, thanks for bringing that up.  I think that's a great resource for our listeners also.  And, you know, the good news is that joy isn't an all-or-nothing gift, and we don't just have to wait for it to return when it goes into hiding, and even when life is bleak, we can reclaim our joy in small pieces and get back to a sense of contentment.  So, if you'd like more information about increasing your well-being or to speak confidentially with an EAP counselor, please contact us at (615) 936-1327, and Mary Clare, thank you for sharing some of your own insights about joy.</p> <p>Dr. Mary Clare Champion:  My pleasure.  Thank you.<br />  <br /> Rosemary Cope:  Thank you all for listening.  If you have a story suggestion, please use the "Contact Us" page on our website at <a href="http://www.vumc.org/health-wellness">www.vumc.org/health-wellness</a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=192" hreflang="en">Change</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=230" hreflang="en">Mental Health</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=240" hreflang="en">Resilience</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=249" hreflang="en">Stress</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=260" hreflang="en">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=261" hreflang="en">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 16 Oct 2020 12:57:40 +0000 harnessg 3326 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Tobacco Cessation: Ready to Quit! https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/wellcasts-wellcasts-occupational-health-clinic/tobacco-cessation-ready-quit <span class="field--node--title">Tobacco Cessation: Ready to Quit!</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=154" hreflang="en">Wellcasts</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=272" hreflang="en">Wellcasts - Occupational Health Clinic</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=138" hreflang="en">Occupational Health Clinic</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 10/09/2020 - 13:23</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3340" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Tobacco Cessation: Ready to Quit!"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Health Plus</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p> <audio controls="" style="height: 54px;"><source src="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/Wellcasts/HW529.mp3" type="audio/mpeg"></source> Your browser does not support the audio element. <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/Wellcasts/HW529.mp3">Download </a> the file to your computer.</audio> </p> <p>​Dr. Michael Chin, Assistant Director of the Vanderbilt Occupational Health Clinic, talks about the prevalence of tobacco use and the best resources and strategies for quitting - including Vanderbilt's employee program Quit Rx.</p> <h3>Begin Transcript</h3> <p>Bridgette Butler:  Welcome to this edition of the Vanderbilt Health and Wellness Wellcast.  I am Bridgette Butler with Health Plus.  I am here today with Dr. Michael Chin, Assistant Director of the Vanderbilt Occupational Health Clinic, and we'll be speaking about tobacco cessation and the best resources and strategies you can use to quit.  Welcome, Dr. Chin, and thank you for joining us today.</p> <p>Dr. Michael Chin:  Thanks for having me, Bridgette.  Good morning.</p> <p>Bridgette Butler:  Good morning.  So glad you're here.  Now, Dr. Chin, there have been encouraging reports over the last several years that tobacco use has been decreasing, yet it still remains a major health concern.  How prevalent is tobacco use at this time?</p> <p>Dr. Michael Chin:  You are absolutely correct.  Across the U.S., tobacco use, smoking in particular, has been on the decline for the last 20 years or so.  Back in 2003, looking ... early 2000's, looking at about a 20% of the population smoking rate, and more recently, as of 2018, looking at about 14%.  So, there's been a dramatic decline over the last 20 years.</p> <p>Bridgette Butler:  That's excellent.</p> <p>Dr. Michael Chin:  Yeah, yeah.  The U.S. is definitely making progress.  I mean, obviously there's 14% of the population still smoking and given that there's a lot of preventable illness and death in that 14%, it's still 14% too many.</p> <p>Bridgette Butler:  What are the health risks associated with tobacco use that are leading to some of those preventable illnesses and deaths?</p> <p>Dr. Michael Chin:  Smoking, as many people know, is related to lung cancer, coronary artery and heart disease, and also, COPD.  So, smoking is actually the cause of 480,000 deaths per year.  That's approximately 1 in 5 deaths in the U.S., so about 20% of deaths.  It kills about 1 of every 2 people who actually use tobacco products.  And in terms of numbers, smoking causes 87% of lung cancer deaths, 32% of heart-related illness deaths, and 80% of deaths from COPD or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.  So, obviously, still a lot of lives that could be saved in that remaining 14% of the U.S. that is still smoking.</p> <p>Bridgette Butler:  Absolutely.  What resources are available to Vanderbilt faculty and staff to assist with tobacco cessation for those who do want to quit?</p> <p>Dr. Michael Chin:  I would like to say, first, that Vanderbilt, both VU and VUMC, as a whole, have relatively low smoking rates, certainly compared to nationally, but even regionally, in terms of Tennessee.  Tennessee has relatively high smoking rates, higher than the national average.  It's around 20%.  But the Vanderbilt community, as a whole, it's around 4%.  So, 4%, you know, is still well under the national average right now of 14%, which is terrific.  That also means there are far fewer individuals probably looking, as a whole, looking for tobacco cessation, but we do offer our Quit Rx program here at the Occupational Health Clinic to help any employees, whether they are staff or faculty, to help guide them through the potential options for smoking cessation.  </p> <p>Bridgette Butler:  That's wonderful.  And how would an employee take advantage of the program?</p> <p>Dr. Michael Chin:  Basically, it's open to any employee, and all they need to do is just make an appointment with us, and actually, given the recent pandemic, many of these visits actually can be just done over telehealth or Zoom.  So, that's very convenient.  The program is nice because it's obviously, the visit itself is free of charge and included as part of a benefit of an employee at VU and VUMC, and the other part of it is that, given a lot of the advances in medical therapy for tobacco cessation, most insurance companies cover the cost of the medication, and one we use very frequently in clinic, once reviewing what the patient is interested in and you know, if they actually are a candidate for medical therapy, one that is very common for us to prescribe is Chantix, and this is something that many primary care offices also will prescribe.  In addition to that, there's other possibilities, some basic nicotine replacement therapy with patches, lozenges or gum.  That's another possibility.</p> <p>Bridgette Butler:  Are there any other components of the Quit Rx program in addition to a visit with a provider at Occupational Health and potentially medication?</p> <p>Dr. Michael Chin:  Sure, absolutely.  So, as part of the visit, a lot of it is about counseling, assessing ... the initial visit is all about assessing where the individual is in terms of their thought process and their readiness to quit and assessing that.  There are some further referrals that we could make, for example, other tools that might be helpful adjunctively, like mindfulness and what not, could be referred down to our sister department at Work/Life Connections or even at Health Plus.  That's a possibility as well.</p> <p>Bridgette Butler:  So, it does sound like a great option for Vanderbilt employees, the Quit Rx program.  Do you have any additional strategies for those who are thinking of quitting at this specific time during the pandemic?</p> <p>Dr. Michael Chin:  This pandemic is a really interesting time to be considering quitting smoking or tobacco cessation, generally, because, as you can imagine, people are extraordinarily stressed right now, and there is some preliminary data showing that there may be an increase, as one might expect, of smoking and tobacco product use.  Part of it may have to do with the added stress, but there is also some behavioral components, too, like being at home most of the time, therefore, not in environments where smoking is disallowed.  But there's also some interesting behaviors that we see with, for example, toilet paper, right, where in the early parts of the pandemic, people would go out and buy mass quantities of toilet paper and just hoard them.  Well, very similar kind of behavior has been reported, too, with cigarettes and tobacco products.  So, given a larger purchasing of these products and possibly stockpiling them at home and more time and more opportunity to use them definitely has added to the likelihood there is increased use during this time.  And then, on the other side of that, is this awareness toward, and generally speaking, for everyone, trying to stay healthy in the pandemic, especially lung health because COVID is an issue with the respiratory system.  So, you do have individuals who are smoking or tobacco users and becoming more motivated or more interested in quitting because of this.  One of the biggest issues, I think, in trying to quit, is something that quarantine has really made difficult, which is social support.  Having adequate amount of social support in quitting is really crucial and underestimated, I think, but in the course of the pandemic, obviously, we all have a very limited ability to connect socially.  So, that's probably the biggest challenge, I think, currently, for those who are really trying to make the effort.</p> <p>Bridgette Butler:  And one recommendation I might have in order to increase their connectedness during this time is to watch the "Game Plan for your Health" video this year, step three of "Go for the Gold."  It's called "Connectedness:  Some Assembly Required."  Very helpful and it's even greater connection during this time.</p> <p>Dr. Michael Chin:  That's a great segue there.</p> <p>Bridgette Butler:  Well, this has been very interesting information and wonderful advice.  Thank you, Dr. Chin, for sharing your expertise on tobacco cessation and the Quit Rx program with us today.</p> <p>Dr. Michael Chin:  Great.  Thanks for the opportunity, Bridgette.<br />  <br /> Bridgette Butler:  Thanks for listening.  If you have a story suggestion, use the "Contact Us" page on our website at <a href="http://www.vumc.org/health-wellness">www.vumc.org/health-wellness</a>.</p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=254" hreflang="en">Tobacco Cessation</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=260" hreflang="en">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=261" hreflang="en">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 09 Oct 2020 18:23:17 +0000 harnessg 3340 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Flu season in the time of COVID-19 https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/wellcasts-wellcasts-occupational-health-clinic/flu-season-time-covid-19 <span class="field--node--title">Flu season in the time of COVID-19</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=272" hreflang="en">Wellcasts - Occupational Health Clinic</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=138" hreflang="en">Occupational Health Clinic</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=154" hreflang="en">Wellcasts</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 09/04/2020 - 00:01</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3301" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Flu season in the time of COVID-19"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Occupational Health Clinic</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p> <audio controls="" style="height: 54px;"><source src="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/Wellcasts/HW525.mp3" type="audio/mpeg"></source> Your browser does not support the audio element. <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/Wellcasts/HW525.mp3">Download </a> the file to your computer.</audio> </p> <p>We discuss the 2020/2021 flu season and getting a flu shot with Dr. Lori Rolando, Director of the Occupational Health Clinic.</p> <p><a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/employee-influenza-vaccine-program">Occupational Health Flu Website</a></p> <h3>Begin Transcript</h3> <p>Welcome to this edition of the Vanderbilt Health and Wellness Wellcast.  I'm Shaina Farfel with Occupational Health.  Today, we are speaking with Dr. Lori Rolando, the Director of the Occupational Health Clinic.  Hi, Dr. Rolando.  Thank you so much for being with us today.</p> <p>Dr. Lori Rolando:  Hi, Shaina.  Thank you for having me.</p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  Of course.  It feels like the only thing on our minds for the past six months or so has been COVID, COVID, COVID, but I guess we also need to start thinking about flu season, and with flu season comes flu shots, and things may look a little different this year.  So, can you tell me how we anticipate COVID may impact this flu season and why this year it may be more important to get your flu vaccine than in years past?</p> <p>Dr. Lori Rolando:  Sure.  So, it's important every year to get your flu vaccine, and we encourage everyone who is six months old or older, who doesn't have a medical contraindication, to get their flu shot every year, because it really is one of the most important things you can do to help prevent flu in yourself as well as those around you.  And particularly this year, with COVID also circulating, it's just that much more important to try and keep yourself healthy and prevent yourself from getting the flu.  You know, one thing is, flu symptoms and COVID symptoms are very similar.  So, getting the flu shot, if it can help prevent you from getting the flu, can help, potentially, maybe, prevent some confusion between, you know, do I have the flu, do I have COVID or do I have some other respiratory infection?  Likewise, if we have flu circulating along with COVID, that can increase the stress on healthcare systems, right, because you've already got folks who are presenting for evaluation for COVID, and then, we have an increase in flu activity and people with flu symptoms who are also going to be presenting for evaluation, again, not just for flu, but also, potentially, for COVID.  And then, then, the people who are at increased risk for COVID and potentially requiring hospitalization or having severe cases of COVID are also those people who are potentially at increased risk for having severe cases of the flu.    And we also just want to protect those individuals.  Most importantly, we want to protect those individuals from getting the flu and potentially having those complications of the flu.  And then, finally, we also don't yet know what coinfection with COVID and flu might look like, but again, the individuals at higher risk, typically, are the same populations that are at higher risk for both, and so, if we can prevent flu infection, that just puts us one step ahead in protecting folks from seeing these types of effects during flu season.</p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  Absolutely.  And you mentioned "higher risk" folks.  Who are the most vulnerable populations for flu, and really, you know, for COVID?</p> <p>Dr. Lori Rolando:  Sure.  So, you know, again, while it’s important for everyone to get the flu shot, it's particularly important for those individuals who are at potentially higher risk, and the CDC would say that anybody who is age 50 or over, individuals with certain chronic medical conditions, like chronic pulmonary conditions, including asthma, people with chronic cardiovascular conditions, kidney disease, liver disease, diabetes and other chronic medical conditions are at higher risk.  People who are immunocompromised, for some reason, so meaning their immune system isn't working the way it should, are at increased risk.  Pregnant women, individuals who are American Indian or Alaskan Natives and people who have a body mass index of greater than 40 are all considered at increased risk.  So, getting your flu shot, again, can not only potentially help prevent infection, because it is about 60% effective in preventing flu.  The other important thing to know about a flu vaccine is that, for those who do get the flu, despite getting vaccinated, getting that vaccination can help minimize your chance of having a severe case of the flu or having complications from the flu.  So, getting your flu shot is really important for a couple of potential reasons.  There are a couple of potential benefits there.</p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  And I think that's a really good and important point.  You hear a lot of people talking about when is the best time to get a flu shot.  You know, some people are like, maybe earlier in the season is not so good.  So, do you have any guidance on when to get it during the season?  Does it matter?</p> <p>Dr. Lori Rolando:  The first and foremost thing to say is - it's important to get your flu shot when you have an opportunity to get it.  So, we don't want folks to pass up an opportunity if it is presented to them, because you don't want to miss out on that just in case another opportunity doesn't present itself.  But if you are looking at, sort of, best time to get vaccinated in terms of what time in the season, the CDC would say that, ideally, they would like to have folks vaccinated by the end of October so that you can be vaccinated, ideally, before you really start to see that increase in flu activity later in the fall or in the winter, but at the same time, you're not getting vaccinated so early, like, you know, July or August, where immunity may not last throughout the whole flu season.  But again, it's when you get that opportunity to be vaccinated, and, you know, for us in the Medical Center, at least, we do have a requirement to be vaccinated by December 1st.  So, again, we’d like to see folks vaccinated by the end of October, but people can get vaccinated anytime throughout the flu season as long as vaccine is available.</p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  And we do have vaccine available now, right?</p> <p>Dr. Lori Rolando:  We do.  We started doing vaccines the first full week of September.  So, we are vaccinating as we speak.</p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  Wonderful.  For folks in the Medical Center who may have a reason why they can't get the flu shot, a medical reason, a religious reason, what do you suggest they need to do?  What's the guidance there?</p> <p>Dr. Lori Rolando:  Sure.  So, there is an exemption process that's in place.  So, anyone who has a medical contraindication, meaning a medical reason why it's unsafe for them to be vaccinated, or has a sincerely-held religious belief, can apply for an exemption, and each exemption is reviewed by the exemption committee on an individual basis. The application can be found on our website.</p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  Okay.  As most of us may know at this point, we are not having a Flulapalooza this year.  We'll all be missing.  So, without that kind of mass vaccination event in place, where do you suggest that folks get their flu shot this year?  What's available to employees?</p> <p>Dr. Lori Rolando:  Sure.  As you noted, we are not going to have a one-day big Flulapalooza mass vaccination event.  Just with COVID, you know, we need to take into consideration social distancing, and so, we wanted to not have a large gathering where we had a lot of folks congregating in one area at one time.  So, we wanted to be respectful of that.  But all of the other options that we utilize each year are available and are being scaled up.  So, for example, the Peer Vaccination Program - so, if you are in a clinical area, if you are in an outpatient clinic or on an inpatient unit, we have peer vaccinators who act as occupational health delegates who can give you the vaccine right where you are at, so you don't even need to make a trip to see us in our clinic.  But we are providing vaccine in our clinic, and our Express Care has been dedicated to providing flu vaccine.  We will be doing on-sites.  We'll have locations here on campus.  They’ll come to the Medical Center and the University to provide flu vaccine.  And for those folks for whom it will be more convenient to get their flu vaccine outside of here on the Vanderbilt campus or through one of our occupational health mechanisms, the community clinics (for example, your PCP walk-in clinics or Vanderbilt Health at Walgreens) are all options.  The vaccination is provided at no out-of-pocket cost, so no deductible or co-pay because it is a preventive vaccine.  And so, any of those locations would be a great option.  Now, one thing to note, if you do go to the Vanderbilt Health at Walgreens, you'll want to make sure you go to the clinic area within Walgreens, and not the pharmacy, in order to ensure that it is covered by insurance.</p> <p>Shaina Farfel:  Okay, so lots of opportunities, it sounds like.</p> <p>Well, thank you so much for your time today, and I just want to mention, if anybody is looking for any additional resources about flu season and the flu vaccine, please visit the Occupational Health flu website.  And Dr. Rolando, thank you again!</p> <p>Dr. Lori Rolando:  Oh, you're welcome.  Thanks so much, Shaina.<br />  <br /> Shaina Farfel:  Thanks for listening.  If you have a story suggestion, you can use the "Contact Us" page on our website at <a href="http://www.vumc.org/health-wellness">www.vumc.org/health-wellness</a>.</p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=218" hreflang="en">Flu</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=228" hreflang="en">Medical Care</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=237" hreflang="en">Prevention</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=238" hreflang="en">Primary Care</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=258" hreflang="en">Vaccines</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=260" hreflang="en">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=261" hreflang="en">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 04 Sep 2020 05:01:00 +0000 harnessg 3301 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Dating In The Age of Corona https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/wellcasts-wellcasts-worklifeconnections/dating-age-corona <span class="field--node--title">Dating In The Age of Corona</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=155" hreflang="en">Work/Life Connections</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=154" hreflang="en">Wellcasts</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=273" hreflang="en">Wellcasts - Work/Life Connections</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 08/21/2020 - 01:00</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3306" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Dating In The Age of Corona"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Work/Life Connections</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p> <audio controls="" style="height: 54px;"><source src="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/Wellcasts/HW524.mp3" type="audio/mpeg"></source> Your browser does not support the audio element. <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/Wellcasts/HW524.mp3">Download </a> the file to your computer.</audio> </p> <p>VUMC staff member, ​Allie Bell, shares her experiences of relationships during the COVID-19 pandemic. This wellcast includes suggestions for healthy dating.</p> <h3>Begin Transcript</h3> <p>Rosemary Cope:  Welcome to this edition of the Vanderbilt Health and Wellness Wellcast.  I'm Rosemary Cope with Work/Life Connections.  Our guest today is Allie Bell.  A graduate of Austin Peay University, Allie is the Research Coordinator for the PRO Employee Health Protections Program.  Today, we are exploring dating in the age of corona.  Dateable podcast host, Julie Krafchick says, "We can't have amnesia that dating was perfect before.  Before all the dating apps, well-intentioned friends and chance meetings, dating has always presented itself with challenges.  "I think this time has given people a lot of clarity into what they want in life," Krafchick says.  It has shown life is short, and at the end of the day, relationships are what matters most.  A lot of people have used this time to do self-work, especially in the dark middle period of quarantine where it didn't feel like there was any way to meet someone.  Allie, as a single woman, generally, what has been your experience in trying to meet suitable dates in the last six months?</p> <p>Allie Bell:  It wasn't until this past two months that I really felt ready to start dating.  When corona started, you think about isolation and safety and things, and I was about three or four months out of a long-term relationship at that time, so in no way was I ready.  I think being isolated with coronavirus helped me to process that a little faster, all that time alone.  It was good use of it.  So, my experience started when I took a leap and opened up a Match.com profile.</p> <p>Rosemary Cope:  Well, listeners, before you freak out about dating during these times, or freak out about thinking about opening up that Match app, keep in mind that thinking about risk and dating isn't a new thing, given that there has always been a risk of contracting an STD, the cold, the flu and a slew of other infectious diseases from the people you date.  It's just that the stakes are a bit higher with COVID-19.  So, Allie, what kind of guidelines do you think are important to consider when starting to date?</p> <p>Allie Bell:  I think it's very important now, and probably always, to spend a lot of time with that person voice-to-voice.  People like texting so much and I think it loses a lot of intention and tone.  So, if I have a match that is not willing to speak on the phone, that is not going to be right for me, because I need that time to get to know them, because you're not only deciding to expose your heart a little bit there, but if you choose to get together, opening up your social circle poses risks to yourself, your family, your co-workers, and so, these are things you have to really be mindful of.</p> <p>Rosemary Cope:  Makes good sense to me.  It also makes good sense to Dr. William Schaffner, who is an Infectious Disease specialist and Professor at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, because he tells us, no matter what your dating situation or relationship status, it's important to make sure the person you are seeing is on the same page as you.  "You ought to have a conversation about this," Dr. Shaffner says, and he doesn't say "text."  He says "conversation." [laughter]  .  So, if you have been really careful, you probably are interested in dating someone who has also been careful.  Even in a relationship, you want to make sure you and your partner are on the same wavelength about safety and risk tolerance.  So, here are some questions that you should consider, listeners, that you should ask before making an in-person date, and Allie, some of what's on this list is exactly what you already had mentioned.  So, number one, what's your COVID-19 status?  Have you been tested?  Although this feels like it goes without saying, it's important to ask people what their exposure level has been.  Have you been tested for COVID-19, or have they been exposed?  Have they exhibited any symptoms?  Number two, what have you been doing the past 14 days?  You should also ask both - what they have been doing and who they have been spending time with.  They may live with a family member who has been an essential worker, or perhaps they have been flouting some of the guidelines that you strictly adhere to.  You should also be honest with them about your own activity and interactions.  Number three, do you wear a mask?  The answer to this question will tell you a lot.  Wearing masks has nearly become a political statement at this point, and if you are someone who wears masks, but your date doesn't do the same, that will give you insight on some of their views on health and safety.  Number four, have you dated?  When was your last date?  Are you still dating?  This borders on that dreaded "what are we" question, but if we have been talking to this person over the course of a few days or even a few weeks, their dating or hookup history is a relevant subject to address.  If you have been going on several in-person dates over the past 14 days, this will subsequently increase your exposure rate as well.  It may feel a bit less romantic to hit a prospective date with these questions before you have even gone out to dinner, but if you've been cautious during the pandemic, it's important to know if someone you are talking to shares the same values before you consider exposing yourself.  So, when you share that bottle of wine, consider sharing that bottle of hand sanitizer.  Allie, thank you for joining us today.</p> <p>Allie Bell:  You're welcome.  It's very helpful advice and some things that I have been considering, and if I might add, I find that in dating now, more than ever, with COVID, it's so important to be honest and frank and brave to ask people, do you have COVID, and what they are, and while it may be uncomfortable, it's paramount to your own safety and your family's safety.  So, it must be done.</p> <p>Rosemary Cope:  Exactly.  Thank you all for listening.  If you have a story suggestion, please use the "Contact Us" page on our website at <a href="http://www.vumc.org/health-wellness.&amp;nbsp">www.vumc.org/health-wellness.&amp;nbsp</a>;</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=200" hreflang="en">Counseling</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=234" hreflang="en">Personal Safety</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=237" hreflang="en">Prevention</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=260" hreflang="en">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=261" hreflang="en">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 21 Aug 2020 06:00:06 +0000 harnessg 3306 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Coping with Quarantine Fatigue https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/wellcasts-wellcasts-health-plus/coping-quarantine-fatigue <span class="field--node--title">Coping with Quarantine Fatigue</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=154" hreflang="en">Wellcasts</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=274" hreflang="en">Wellcasts - Health Plus</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=137" hreflang="en">Health Plus</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 08/14/2020 - 13:41</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3281" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Coping with Quarantine Fatigue"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Health Plus</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>​Jim Kendall, Manager of Work-Life Connections/EAP, offers strategies for long-term coping and tips to navigate feelings of uncertainty and anxiety related to the pandemic.</p> <p><a href="https://redcap.vanderbilt.edu/surveys/?s=4D93XNF4R8" target="_blank">Watch</a> this WellCast.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=260" hreflang="en">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=261" hreflang="en">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 14 Aug 2020 18:41:45 +0000 harnessg 3281 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Relationships and COVID-19 https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/wellcasts-wellcasts-worklifeconnections/relationships-and-covid-19 <span class="field--node--title">Relationships and COVID-19</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=273" hreflang="en">Wellcasts - Work/Life Connections</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=155" hreflang="en">Work/Life Connections</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=154" hreflang="en">Wellcasts</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 07/17/2020 - 12:16</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3289" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Relationships and COVID-19"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Work/Life Connections</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p> <audio controls="" style="height: 54px;"><source src="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/Wellcasts/HW521.mp3" type="audio/mpeg"></source> Your browser does not support the audio element. <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/Wellcasts/HW521.mp3">Download </a> the file to your computer.</audio> </p> <p>​Brad Oxnam talks with Janet McCutchen, LPC, of Work/Life Connections-EAP about advice for maintaining or improving relationships during the COVID-19 pandemic situation.</p> <h3>Begin Transcript</h3> <p>Brad Oxnam: Welcome to this edition of the Vanderbilt Health and Wellness Wellcast. This is Brad Oxnam with Vanderbilt Work/Life Connections filling in for our regular host, Rosemary Cope. This month, I'm joined by Janet McCutchen, one of our Licensed Professional Counselors with Work/Life Connections EAP. Today, we will be discussing maintaining your relationships during the stressful time of our current pandemic.</p> <p>COVID-19 has caused a multitude of stressful issues, not only for individuals, but for families, couples and cohabitators as well. We can all feel on edge at times. Many couples and families are working from home where work stress is coupled with relationship stress, not to mention feeling the fatigue caused by virtual online sessions, social media and so on. Janet, what are some ways we can improve or maintain our relationships during COVID-19?</p> <p>Janet McCutchen: Thanks so much, Brad. You know, there are many people that have said how much they've enjoyed the extra time with their partners and family, so, when we talk about this, certainly, we don't want to infer that it's all been a bad thing, but we know that it's been incredibly stressful, and one of the ways that we know that we tend to cope with stress is by "checking out." What I mean by that is that we often binge T.V., are on our phones, we are surfing the internet, and so, my first suggestion would be - put down your phone.  When we are in close quarters, it's important to remember that, with the stress we are experiencing, we often long to have somebody to turn to for comfort, and ideally, for most of us, it's our partners. When we do this, we need to keep in mind that our partners may not always be in a good place to be fully present for us, I mean, even when we turn to them and ask something like, "Is this a good time; I really need to connect with you and talk about what's going on with me for five or 10 minutes?"  The other piece of that is that we need to be able to give them a right to say that it's not a good time.  People are working from home, so we are sort of bringing the stress and the pressures, the issues, of work into our homes. So, when our partner maybe says that, they could also maybe give us some options, like, "This isn't a good time right now, but I want to be able to meet with you and talk later." So, we have the responsibility to ask for what we want, and then, we also have to allow our partners room to postpone. But if we put down our phones and reconnect, we can really look at each other, we can practice active listening without judgment, and really offer each other just kind of these mini compassion breaks when we are not looking at our phones or checking out. </p> <p>One of the other ways I recommend people improve their relationship is to think about taking a break before you need it. This is good advice in general. You know, at Work/Life Connections, we often encourage our clients not to wait until they are overwhelmed, but to really tune in to what is going on with respect to maybe the exhaustion they feel, or the sadness they feel. So, the best time to reach out is before you hit a wall and perhaps become too overwhelmed to have the energy to reach out or motivation to take care of ourselves. Many times, you know, Vanderbilt employees are caretakers in some form or another, you know, whether you work on the medical side or on the university as an instructor or coordinator. We all, regardless of our work responsibilities, have a tendency to minimize our need for support. So, talking with someone objective, if you don't want to burden your partner, other family member or friend, can really make all the difference. So, take a break before you really need it, before you become overwhelmed. </p> <p>The third suggestion I have is practicing gratitude and giving during this time, and I really don't want to paint too rosy a picture. You know, I don't want to infer that this isn't a difficult time and create a "silver lining," if you will, that isn't there, but at the same time, many of us are enjoying more time with our families. I mean, the other piece of this is - we have time to connect during the day with our partners and family, we have less time in traffic, we have the opportunity to try something new, read that book that we've postponed reading or finally clean out the garage, but not every rewarding activity involves some exciting event or accomplishment. Sometimes, it's a good idea to pause and think about what we are grateful for, and it can be the simple things. So, we have that opportunity to gather around the dinner table or, you know, let our partners and family know what they mean to us. We have to also embrace some other ways of connecting in our communities with respect to giving. You know, maybe we can give of our time or money. I mean, there's ample research out there around the positive impact of gratitude on our brain just neurologically. A study at UC Berkeley found that people who actively practice gratitude by giving time or contributing to a charitable cause demonstrate more activity in the prefrontal cortex, which is the decision-making and learning portion of the brain. So, there's that altruism that really can have an impact on just our day-to-day function, which can be really very important and can reduce those feelings of anxiety and distress. Relationships really make a difference and learning how to build those skills and look at things from a different perspective can really help.</p> <p>Brad Oxnam:  Thanks for the advice, Janet! I would mention, if you are feeling excessively stressed during this time, if you are a Vanderbilt employee or spouse, you are welcome to call and make an appointment with Work/Life Connections EAP and talk to a counselor.</p> <p>Thank you for listening to today's Wellcast. If you have story suggestions, please use the "Contact" page on our website at <a href="http://www.vumc.org/health-wellness">www.vumc.org/health-wellness</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=261" hreflang="en">VUMC</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=260" hreflang="en">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=248" hreflang="en">Social Connections</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=240" hreflang="en">Resilience</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=230" hreflang="en">Mental Health</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=215" hreflang="en">Family</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 17 Jul 2020 17:16:27 +0000 harnessg 3289 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness What, Why, & How of Telemedicine Visits https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/wellcasts-wellcasts-health-plus/what-why-how-telemedicine-visits <span class="field--node--title">What, Why, &amp; How of Telemedicine Visits</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=154" hreflang="en">Wellcasts</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=137" hreflang="en">Health Plus</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=274" hreflang="en">Wellcasts - Health Plus</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 07/10/2020 - 00:01</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3270" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to What, Why, &amp; How of Telemedicine Visits"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Health Plus</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>​Dr. Daniel Cotrell describes Telemedicine visits, why they are helpful, when they should be used, and how to arrange and prepare for a Telemedicine visit.</p> <p><a href="https://redcap.vanderbilt.edu/surveys/?s=ATJAJ3HL4W" target="_blank" title="Watch">Watch</a> this video Wellcast now.</p> <h3>Begin Transcript</h3> <p>Bridgette Butler:  Hello, and welcome to this Health Plus "Healthier Than You" wellcast.  Today, we are talking about telemedicine.  It's a good option to easily interact with your healthcare provider.  And here to speak with us today about telemedicine is Dr. Daniel Cottrell, Assistant Professor of Clinical Internal Medicine.  Welcome, Dr. Cottrell.</p> <p>Dr. Daniel Cottrell:  Thank you.</p> <p>Bridgette Butler:  We are glad you are here today.  And to begin, what exactly is a telemedicine visit?</p> <p>Dr. Daniel Cottrell:  It's a great question.  Thank you for asking.  So, a telehealth or telemedicine visit is a visit with your regular provider, but it's done virtually through the Internet.  It's going to be using a camera, like a videochat you might do with a friend or a family member.</p> <p>Bridgette Butler:  Great, and what are the advantages of a telemedicine visit?</p> <p>Dr. Daniel Cottrell:  So, the biggest advantage is in our current situation with the coronavirus, this allows us to keep our patients at home, yet still reach out to them to provide them a health assessment.  In particular, for patients who may think they are sick with this virus, this allows them to stay home and yet us evaluate them through history and observing them to decide if they should be tested at any of the many facilities in the state.  But telehealth is also for patients who don't have coronavirus concerns.  It's a way for us to reach out to patients and talk about their chronic health conditions.  And the biggest advantage is, they get to stay home, they don't have to put up with driving in, parking, dealing with elevators and waiting rooms where there might be social distancing concerns, but also just saving the time on the commute in general.</p> <p>Bridgette Butler:  And what types of visits work well for telemedicine?</p> <p>Dr. Daniel Cottrell:  Here at Vanderbilt, we are currently doing telemedicine visits for all regular office followups as well as our Medicare annual wellness exams.  For patients who have our Vanderbilt Aetna insurance, you may be able to do your regular annual exam through telehealth as well, but other insurance companies have to ... the patient will have to check with their insurance company to see if it's allowed.  We can do just about anything over telehealth (you'd be surprised), since a lot of what we do as providers is through our history gathering, asking questions to figure out what we think is going on with a patient, and then we can do some exam features by asking you to get up, move around, show us various things, palpate things or push on things on your own body and tell us how it feels.  We can get a good sense of what you might be dealing with.</p> <p>Bridgette Butler:  Wonderful.  And does a telemedicine visit cost more than an on-site visit?  Is it something insurance would cover?</p> <p>Dr. Daniel Cottrell:  Also a great question.  In the current situation with the coronavirus, the President has declared that telehealth visits are available to all patients.  There is no extra fee for this service.  The co-pay and co-insurance and deductibles that you would have paid for a normal office visit are all the same.  There are no extra fees.</p> <p>Bridgette Butler:  That's fantastic.  And how do I set up a telemedicine visit with my doctor?</p> <p>Dr. Daniel Cottrell:  So, you would request a visit with your doctor the same way you would always do.  You would either be calling or sending a message through your My Health at Vanderbilt.  That last part is key.  All patients must have a My Health at Vanderbilt account because the platform that we are using, the computer technology, goes through that My Health.  If you need help setting that up, you can also call us and we are happy to help in that way, too.  If you believe that there is a concern you are having that would better-served in the office, we are happy to see you at this time, too.  We are seeing a limited number of patients in the office with protocols in place to ensure everyone's safety.  But if you call us and tell us why you want to come, we might be able to review your chart and have your provider look at your request, and we might actually still be able to do that over telehealth.  You would be surprised.</p> <p>Bridgette Butler:  That's great.  Thank you so much for the information today.  It sounds like a really great, wonderful option for seeing our doctors, particularly at this time, but even in the future.</p> <p>Dr. Daniel Cottrell:  Thank you.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=260" hreflang="en">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=261" hreflang="en">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 10 Jul 2020 05:01:53 +0000 harnessg 3270 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Emotional Wellness and Advocacy https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/wellcasts-wellcasts-worklifeconnections/emotional-wellness-and-advocacy <span class="field--node--title">Emotional Wellness and Advocacy</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=154" hreflang="en">Wellcasts</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=155" hreflang="en">Work/Life Connections</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=273" hreflang="en">Wellcasts - Work/Life Connections</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 06/19/2020 - 00:01</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3272" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Emotional Wellness and Advocacy"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Work/Life Connections</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p> <audio controls="" style="height: 54px;"><source src="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/Wellcasts/HW504.mp3" type="audio/mpeg"></source> Your browser does not support the audio element. <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/Wellcasts/HW504.mp3">Download </a> the file to your computer.</audio> </p> <p>​Brad Oxnam interviews Quianda Harris, EdD, LPC-MHSP, of Vanderbilt Work/Life Connections-EAP on both maintaining emotional wellness and supporting the African American community.</p> <h3>Begin Transcript</h3> <p>Brad Oxnam:  Hello.  Welcome to this edition of the Vanderbilt Health and Wellness wellcast.  This is Brad Oxnam with Vanderbilt Work/Life Connections, once again filling in for our regular host, Rosemary Cope.  I am joined by Dr. Quianda Harris, one of our Work/Life Connections counselors.  Dr. Harris is a Licensed Professional Counselor with Work/Life Connections EAP as well as a Master Addictions Counselor.  As I am sure many can attest, this year has been a challenging one to say the least.  Our community has faced tornadoes, followed closely by the U.S. onset of the COVID pandemic, subsequent economic downtown and struggles with keeping or finding work, and most recently, the national rise in tensions caused by continual racial injustices to our black and brown citizens by police forces.  With all of this going on, many people are feeling a wide range of emotions from anxiety to outrage to depression and everything in between.  It can feel a little overwhelming and some may wonder whether or not to seek help with these feelings.  Dr. Harris, in terms of mental health, what is considered a normal level of emotional stress, and when should someone consider seeking the services of a licensed professional?</p> <p>Dr. Quianda Harris:  I think what you just stated is normal: a wide range of emotions, depression, anxiety, feeling overwhelmed and feeling stressed.  The difference is everyone goes through periods of feeling these emotions; however, if you find that it's more difficult to snap out of it and the symptoms are causing problems in your daily life and ability to function, then it may not be a bad idea to talk to someone just to be able to process your thoughts, and even if those symptoms aren't as severe, it's always a good idea just to reach out and speak to someone, because oftentimes, you know, these things will continue to run through our heads and cause us sleepless nights and increased feelings of anxiety.  I find that it's helpful when I say those things out loud sometimes and just have someone to listen and provide objective feedback.</p> <p>Brad Oxnam:  Many are feeling called to respond to current events, namely the Black Lives Matter movement, but some may feel hesitant due to the coronavirus situation.  If people want to do something, what options are there during a pandemic?</p> <p>Dr. Quianda Harris:  I am hearing of a lot of people doing things online, for example, supporting black businesses.  That has been one way in which people are showing their support.  You know, a lot of small business are struggling anyway, so, black businesses have definitely been promoted recently.  Another way people can participate or feel as though they are making some type of change and impact is to learn more about everything that's going on.  We've had many discussions in the last couple of weeks and one recurring theme is education and finding resources to just learn about the history of black people in America and the struggles and challenges that community has faced.  Another way is to listen.  One thing that a lot of individuals are finding themselves doing right now is moving outside of their comfort zones and having the difficult conversations about race relations and what they can do to be better allies.  Things like that are ways in which people can start making changes in their own personal lives and the professional lives and ways that are not going to be harmful as it relates to the current pandemic.</p> <p>Brad Oxnam:  Does Vanderbilt have any resources for employees who wish to support the cause in some way?</p> <p>Dr. Quianda Harris:  The VUMC House Staff compiled a list of resources for allies at the VUMC Day of Silence for Black Lives and that list includes things people can do, watch, read, listen, as well as other ways to take action.  Also, the Office of Health Equity has a list of resources.  There are ways and means by which to educate yourselves and just learn more about history, essentially, and why things are so tense at this point, and just for more insight into the struggles that our neighbors, our friends, our families, our co-workers have faced, and to feel as though you are making some kind of impact.  So, yes, there are resources available, and if you cannot find them, it's never a bad thing to just ask someone.</p> <p>Brad Oxnam:  Thank you very much, Dr. Harris.  We appreciate your thoughts and hope those who wish to will take advantage of these resources.</p> <p>Thanks for listening to today's Wellcast.  If you have a story suggestion, please use the "Contact" page on our website at <a href="http://www.vumc.org/health-wellness">www.vumc.org/health-wellness</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=261" hreflang="en">VUMC</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=230" hreflang="en">Mental Health</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=203" hreflang="en">Crisis</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=248" hreflang="en">Social Connections</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 19 Jun 2020 05:01:48 +0000 harnessg 3272 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Coronavirus: Parenting in an Uncertain World https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/wellcasts-wellcasts-health-plus/coronavirus-parenting-uncertain-world <span class="field--node--title">Coronavirus: Parenting in an Uncertain World</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=154" hreflang="en">Wellcasts</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=274" hreflang="en">Wellcasts - Health Plus</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=137" hreflang="en">Health Plus</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 05/29/2020 - 08:30</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3265" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Coronavirus: Parenting in an Uncertain World"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Health Plus</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p> <audio controls="" style="height: 54px;"><source src="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/Wellcasts/HW518.mp3" type="audio/mpeg"></source> Your browser does not support the audio element. <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/Wellcasts/HW518.mp3">Download </a> the file to your computer.</audio> </p> <p>​Dr. Catherine Fuchs, Professor of Psychiatry &amp; Behavioral Science and Pediatrics, talks about the Coronavirus: Parenting in an Uncertain World psychoeducational parenting group at Vanderbilt for faculty and staff who are parents.</p> <h3>Begin Transcript</h3> <p>Bridgette Butler:  Welcome to this edition of the Vanderbilt Health and Wellness wellcast.  I'm Bridgette Butler with Health Plus.  Today, we are going to be learning about "Coronavirus:  Parenting in an Uncertain World," a new parenting group that has been created at Vanderbilt in response to the challenges of parenting during coronavirus.  Joining me to talk about this new psychoeducational group for parents is one of the group's creators, Dr. Catherine Fuchs, Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Pediatrics.  Welcome, Dr. Fuchs!<br />  <br /> Dr. Catherine Fuchs:  Thank you.  Good to be here.</p> <p>Bridgette Butler:  Well, we are happy to have you here and to learn about this amazing new resource that you created.  So, the group was developed as a psychoeducational group.  What is a psychoeducational group?</p> <p>Dr. Catherine Fuchs:  Psychoeducation really refers to education around information related to psychological issues.  So, we created the concept of the group that would help parents have the information that could be useful in responding to the stress of coronavirus, and how that impacts their kids, themselves as parents, and just daily life.</p> <p>Bridgette Butler:  This particular psychoeducation group for parents, why was this developed at this time?</p> <p>Dr. Catherine Fuchs:  In terms of just recognizing the impact of a pandemic on the general population and seeing what we see clinically, it's important to think about prevention and support for families.  So, if you look at the pandemic, it's almost like there are all these concentric circles.  You've got the acute worries about illness and then you have the worries about illness in your loved ones and then you have the impact of kids being home from school, and for some kids, that's a good thing; for others, it's maybe not as good a thing, but for parents, it's certainly a huge change in the structure of the day.  You've got parents juggling, trying to maintain a job, and they are working from home, or some parents who have lost a job and trying to deal with the economic impacts.  So, there are so many areas that this pandemic is affecting people that, I think it becomes really important to look at - what does that do in terms of just the family and your kids and managing your own response.  Social distancing is the other factor that creates major challenges.</p> <p>Bridgette Butler:  Who is going to be leading this group and what is the group format like?</p> <p>Dr. Catherine Fuchs:  We are offering two separate groups, one on Tuesdays and the other on Thursdays, and each group will be led by one of our clinical psychology interns.  So, these are individuals who have completed their undergraduate degree, have completed their Masters work in psychology and almost completed their Ph.D. in psychology and they are doing a clinical internship with us.  We have a Tuesday group and that's going to be at 8:00 a.m.  Then, Thursdays, we are offering an afternoon group, so that will be at 4 o'clock,</p> <p>Bridgette Butler:  What sort of discussions can parents look forward to having as part of this group?</p> <p>Dr. Catherine Fuchs:  We will provide a didactic section where, providing information about different topics, and I will mention some of the topics in a minute, but then also make sure there's time for questions and answers and discussion by the participants who are there.  So, we have several topics.  Certainly, other topics may come up as parents ask questions, but in general, how do I talk to my child about this virus, and those of us who work with children are very developmentally-focused and recognize that talking with a five-year-old is very different than talking with a 15-year-old.  So, they will address some of the developmental aspects of that dialogue and try to help parents, especially if you have a five-year-old and a 15-year-old, to think through how to manage that balance.  We will be talking about how do you help your child cope with uncertainty during this time of pandemic, and to help a child cope with uncertainty, we will also need to talk about how, you as a parent, cope with uncertainty, because I think we all, before this pandemic, at least, thought we had some control over our daily lives and whatever level of control that we thought we had has been shaken by this pandemic, and that sense of uncertainty can generate anxiety in people.  We will talk about helpful tips for social distancing.  There are a lot of teenagers who are saying, "I just want to be with my friends," and how do you help your teenager factor in the importance of social distancing and actually implement it, or how do you help a young child who doesn't really understand the need for social distancing?  And then, just acknowledging the parental worries and stresses that they have, so the parents who have to keep the household going, and either single parent or not - how do you get groceries and worries about exposure and managing exposure? How do you manage your worries about your aging parent or parents if they are in the picture?  How do you manage home-schooling?  So, there are all kinds of stressors that parents are dealing with right now, and just some guidance and ideas on how to manage that.  So, this is not a therapy group.  This is really an educational group about - how can I get some tools and strategies for managing these questions and worries that I might have?  How do you talk with your kids about loss or grief, because some families are going to be impacted by loss during this time. How do you talk about emotions in a way that is protective and supportive for your child and for yourself?  And further, just how, as an individual, can I strengthen my own resilience?</p> <p>Bridgette Butler:  These are very important topics, very important questions that people have, and I know that everyone will really appreciate being able to have a forum to discuss them and especially with the professional guidance.  Who can participate in this group and how can you participate?</p> <p>Dr. Catherine Fuchs:  So, it's designed for faculty and staff here at Vanderbilt who are parents, and we have had one individual who referred a faculty or staff member whose adult daughter is a parent and that individual signed up.  So, we are really trying to support the families of our faculty and staff.  And how to participate?  Signing up with the REDCap link You will join in on Zoom.  There will be the educational component that the leader will provide and then there will be opportunity for question and answer.  The REDCap link is redcap.link\covidcoping.</p> <p>Bridgette Butler:  Great.  That's a good one ... easy to remember.  We'll make sure to include that link, not only in the transcript of the interview but also on the web page with the wellcast.</p> <p><br /> Bridgette Butler:  Dr. Catherine Fuchs, thank you so much for joining us today.</p> <p>Dr. Catherine Fuchs:  Thank you.  It's good to be here.<br />  <br /> Bridgette Butler:  Thanks for listening.  If you have a story suggestion, use the "Contact Us" page on our website at <a href="http://www.vumc.org/health-wellness">www.vumc.org/health-wellness</a>.</p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=260" hreflang="en">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=261" hreflang="en">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 29 May 2020 13:30:38 +0000 harnessg 3265 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Coping with Stress During COVID-19 https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/wellcasts-wellcasts-health-plus/coping-stress-during-covid-19 <span class="field--node--title">Coping with Stress During COVID-19</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=154" hreflang="en">Wellcasts</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=137" hreflang="en">Health Plus</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=274" hreflang="en">Wellcasts - Health Plus</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 05/08/2020 - 00:01</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3269" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Coping with Stress During COVID-19"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Health Plus</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Dr. Jim Jackson, Psychologist with VUMC Critical Illness, Brain Injury, and Survivorship Center, discusses the stressors of  COVID-19, lesser known symptoms of stress, and effective methods of coping with stress.</p> <p><a href="https://redcap.vanderbilt.edu/surveys/?s=4THXJ48HCM" target="_blank">Watch</a> this video Wellcast now.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=260" hreflang="en">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=261" hreflang="en">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 08 May 2020 05:01:10 +0000 harnessg 3269 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness Resilience during the Pandemic https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/wellcasts-wellcasts-worklifeconnections/resilience-during-pandemic <span class="field--node--title">Resilience during the Pandemic</span> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=154" hreflang="en">Wellcasts</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=273" hreflang="en">Wellcasts - Work/Life Connections</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?cat=155" hreflang="en">Work/Life Connections</a></div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/health-wellness/users/harnessg-0" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">harnessg</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 05/01/2020 - 00:12</span> <a href="/health-wellness/blog-post-rss/3261" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Resilience during the Pandemic"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field-name-field-barista-posts-author field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field-item">Work/Life Connections</div> </div> <div class="text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p> <audio controls="" style="height: 54px;"><source src="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/Wellcasts/HW496.mp3" type="audio/mpeg"></source> Your browser does not support the audio element. <a href="https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness/sites/vumc.org.health-wellness/files/public_files/Wellcasts/HW496.mp3">Download </a> the file to your computer.</audio> </p> <p>​Jim Kendall offers recommendations for resilience practices for all employees who are facing stressful situations during COVID-19.</p> <h3>Begin Transcript</h3> <p>Rosemary Cope:  Welcome to this edition of the Vanderbilt Health and Wellness wellcast.  I am Rosemary Cope with Work/Life Connections.  I'm here today with Jim Kendall, who is the Manager of the Work/Life Connections-EAP.  You know, Jim, I've been thinking about the needs of our Vanderbilt employees in this highly-stressful time.  Our medical center employees have a strong sense of duty for performing their jobs and may feel guilty if they think they aren't doing enough, they may also be feeling the strain of being isolated from family and friends because of the roles in the hospitals and not wanting to possibly infect someone else, and all of our Vanderbilt faculty may be challenged by things such as remote teaching. Our university, our medical center staff, have to manage facilities to ensure they have been disinfected.  Some of our employees on the medical center side and the university side have future worries about will there be a reduction in force.  So, self-care for all of our employees is key to balance and resilience.  Jim, what kind of behaviors should we practice for good self-care and what behaviors should we avoid?<br />  <br /> Jim Kendall:  Thanks Rosemary, I think that good self-care during this time means being appropriately informed but not obsessed with the media, and I appreciate that Vanderbilt has an excellent web resource that provides all the evidence-based information that you need, and I use that as my one resource for information.  Self-care also means being safe and following the guidelines that we all hear about - hand washing and appropriate protective equipment so that when I'm out in public, I wear a mask, and I try to stay the proper distance from people, and of course, if we notice any symptoms like fever, coughing or sore throat, we get appropriate help.  But, you know, practicing our resilient skills and paying attention to healthy lifestyle is within our new reality.  We have to do things that allow us to take a little breather from thinking about COVID all the time, so, I think things like mindfulness, and by that, I mean just focusing on the moment, not what might happen, but here and now, and that might be going outside and taking in a little fresh air and appreciating the scenery, appreciating some of the beauty that's out there, and it may be setting boundaries.  A lot of times, people ask you questions because you work in a university or hospital, and they are saying, "Well, you know, let's talk about this," and you might be ready to take a breather from that, and so we may need to just say, "You know, let's talk about something else; I need to have a boundary there."  Our bodies and minds need a break from that.  I guess, the other thing I would say is, that one of the beauties is that we breathe, and tactical breathing can be very powerful when we start to get keyed up.  It's just taking that deep breath, thinking, inhaling one, two, three, four, hold for four, and then exhale, and then wait four ... all those things that we have heard about when we talked about building resilience, but this becomes so key now.  We need sleep, exercise, and we need to connect with our support people, yet keep the physical distance.  I also think it's important to share your feelings and vulnerabilities and pay attention to the good moments.</p> <p>Rosemary Cope:  That's excellent advice and it keeps us centered, it keeps us grounded, and it keeps us in the moment without all that anticipatory anxiety that a lot of us are experiencing at this point.</p> <p>Jim Kendall:  I think worrying is normal under conditions of the unknown.</p> <p>Rosemary Cope:  Absolutely.</p> <p>Jim Kendall:  But it's so key to focus on what is really in your sphere of control, what influence do you have, and I just say - do what you can do and don't focus on what you can't.  I think many of us are used to helping others, and think about the ways that you can actually help each other.  That can be a wellness champion.  It can also mean being a buddy to a co-worker, help them with some technology, reach out and teach others.  One of the things that I've started doing is going through my phone and looking for people that I haven't talked to in a long time and just try to make one connection with somebody each day.  So, basically, we've all got to put on our emotional raincoat, because this is a storm, and we need to be intentional about the breaks that we take and take a walk or pay attention if you have pets or kids, find a new interest, play with them, and it's vital to do a daily self-check on your own wellness pulse.</p> <p>Rosemary Cope:  Great suggestions, Jim.  If I'm feeling overwhelmed, even if I add these resilient skills in, who do I need to call?</p> <p>Jim Kendall:  Well, we always suggest that you give us a call at Work/Life Connections-EAP.  Give us a call at (615) 936-1327 and we can set up a time to talk.  And right now, we are using our Connect Care remote services where we can connect virtually through Zoom or through the phone and we have that way of reaching out and you have somebody that you can talk with.</p> <p>Rosemary Cope: Great, thank you so much, Jim.  Appreciate it.</p> <p>Jim Kendall:  Thank you, Rosemary.<br />  <br /> Rosemary Cope:  Thank you all for listening.  If you have a story suggestion, please use the "Contact Us" page on our website at <a href="http://www.vumc.org/health-wellness">www.vumc.org/health-wellness</a>.</p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=230" hreflang="en">Mental Health</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=240" hreflang="en">Resilience</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=260" hreflang="en">VU</a>, <a href="/health-wellness/wellcasts?tag=261" hreflang="en">VUMC</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 01 May 2020 05:12:00 +0000 harnessg 3261 at https://www.vumc.org/health-wellness