VIGH’s Trevathan appointed to NINDS Advisory Council

VUMC Reporter
January 20, 2020

Edwin Trevathan, MD, MPH, director of the Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health (VIGH), has been appointed to the Advisory Council for the National Institute for Neurological Diseases and Stroke (NINDS) of the National Institutes of Health. Trevathan, the Amos Christie Chair in Global Health and professor of Pediatrics and Neurology, will serve a four-year term on the National Advisory Neurological Disorders and Stroke Council (NANDSC). The advisory council meets three times a year to provide guidance to the NINDS director on programming, reviews and reports on intramural and extramural programs.

Wilkins named CTSA co-principal investigator

VUMC Reporter
January 16, 2020

Consuelo Wilkins, MD, MSCI, a leader in health equity at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Vanderbilt University School of Medicine (VUSM), has joined Gordon Bernard, MD, as co-principal investigator (co-PI) of Vanderbilt’s Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA). The $8-million-a-year federal grant supports the Vanderbilt Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (VICTR), which since 2007 has fostered the development of innovations including BioVU, Vanderbilt’s massive DNA repository, ResearchMatch, an online national volunteer recruitment registry, and REDCap, a Web-based research management application used worldwide.

Interim directors of Cardiovascular Medicine named

VUMC Reporter
January 9, 2020

Dan Roden, MD, Senior Vice President for Personalized Medicine, and Daniel Munoz, MD, MPA, medical director of Quality for Vanderbilt Heart and Vascular Institute (VHVI), have been named interim directors of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Their appointments are effective February 2020. Munoz, who is also assistant professor of Medicine and medical director of the Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit (CVICU), will be responsible for clinical matters and Roden, who holds the endowed Sam L. Clark, MD, PhD Chair in the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, will lead academic efforts.

Rothman to succeed Dittus as director of Institute for Medicine and Public Health

VUMC Reporter
January 7, 2020
Posted in

Russell Rothman, MD, MPP, professor of Internal Medicine, Pediatrics and Health Policy, Ingram Professor of Integrative and Population Health, and Vice President for Population Health Research, has been named as the new director of the Institute for Medicine and Public Health (IMPH), and Senior Vice President for Population and Public Health. His appointment is effective Feb. 1. In this new role Rothman will report to Jennifer Pietenpol, PhD, Executive Vice President for Research and Director of the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center. Rothman is also principal investigator of the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCOR) funded STAR (Stakeholders, Technology and Research) Clinical Research Network which engages VUMC, VHAN, Meharry Medical College, Duke University, the University of North Carolina, Wake Forest University, Health Sciences of South Carolina, and Mayo Clinic with electronic health records on over 12 million patients. The Network supports real world evidence research and pragmatic clinical research.

Diabetes drug study explores cardiovascular risks for patients with kidney disease

VUMC Reporter
October 3, 2019

Over the years there has been uncertainty over which drugs are best for patients with Type 2 diabetes and one of its common complications, kidney disease. An observational study using medical record information from nearly 50,000 U.S. military veterans sheds new light on this issue. Among the 30 million U.S. adults with Type 2 diabetes, 20% have impaired kidney function. In patients like this, metformin, the recommended first-line drug therapy for Type 2 diabetes, is associated in the new study with 20 percent decreased risk of major adverse cardiovascular events when compared to a class of common diabetes drugs called sulfonylureas.

Lindsell appointed to HEAlth Data Science Center co-directorship

VUMC Reporter
October 3, 2019

The HEAlth Data Science (HEADS) Center at Vanderbilt University Medical Center is undergoing a reorganization to further refine the center’s mission, and Christopher Lindsell, PhD, has been named a new co-director. “The HEADS Center is now poised to accelerate its work, and naming Dr. Lindsell to a co-directorship will assist us in doing just that,” said Kevin Johnson, MD, MS, Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor and chair of the Department of Biomedical Informatics. “The vision is for the center to be a powerful catalyst for innovation and translation at the intersection of data science and healthcare practice at VUMC as well as on a broader scale.”

All-in-one pill helps reduce blood pressure, cholesterol

VUMC Reporter
September 19, 2019

A single pill containing low doses of three medications to treat high blood pressure and one to lower cholesterol reduced the estimated risk of cardiovascular disease by 25%, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). “Polypills” for prevention of cardiovascular disease have previously been studied in low- and middle-income countries where other health care barriers exist, according to senior author Thomas Wang, MD, chief of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. But the U.S. study of mostly low income, primarily black adults from a community health center in Mobile, Alabama, sets up a conversation about how to extend these findings to other settings.

Team to develop ‘safe harbor’ standards of care

VUMC Reporter
May 2, 2019

A team of researchers from Vanderbilt Health and Vanderbilt University’s schools of Law, Medicine and Management has received a five-year $1.7 million research grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality of the Department of Health and Human Services to develop and test “safe-harbor” standards of care based on scientific evidence. A goal of the project is to reduce the number of unnecessary medical procedures performed primarily to reduce legal liability, a practice known as defensive medicine. Benefits could include lower costs and improved quality of care, resulting from medical patients’ reduced exposure to radiation.

Program for scientists to move discoveries into clinical practice

VUMC Reporter
August 31, 2017

Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) has established a new career development program for scientists in implementation research. The goal is to speed the uptake and translation of scientific discoveries into routine clinical practice. The program, called Vanderbilt Scholars in T4 Translational Research, or V-STTaR, is supported by a five-year, $3 million grant awarded this month by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). T4 refers to the translation of research findings into “real world” and community settings. V-STTaR will be led by Sunil Kripalani, M.D., MSc, principal investigator and associate professor of Medicine, and Christianne Roumie, M.D., MPH, program director and associate professor of Medicine and Pediatrics.

Doris Duke Foundation lauds Van Driest’s research

VUMC Reporter
July 27, 2017
Posted in

Sara Van Driest, M.D., Ph.D., who is developing methods for precision dosing of pediatric medications at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC), has received a 2017 Clinical Scientist Development Award from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. Sara Van Driest, M.D., Ph.D. Van Driest, assistant professor of Pediatrics and Medicine at Vanderbilt, is one of 17 junior physician scientists chosen this year from among 196 applicants to receive the award, which provides $495,000 in research support over three years to support their transition to independent clinical research. Van Driest is the fourth current physician-scientist at VUMC to receive a Clinical Scientist Development Award from the New York-based foundation.