Blog RSS https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab/ en Holowatyj receives National Cancer Institute MERIT Award https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab/news-media/holowatyj-receives-national-cancer-institute-merit-award <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Holowatyj receives National Cancer Institute MERIT Award</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/holowatyj-lab/users/kopcol" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kopcol</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 07/19/2023 - 14:10</span> <a href="/holowatyj-lab/blog-post-rss/142" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Holowatyj receives National Cancer Institute MERIT Award"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field__item">Tom Wilemon</div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-external-url field--type-link field--label-hidden field__item"><a href="https://news.vumc.org/2023/07/19/holowatyj-receives-national-cancer-institute-merit-award/" target="_blank">https://news.vumc.org/2023/07/19/holowatyj-receives-national-cancer-institute-merit-award/</a></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>"'As the number of adults within their childbearing years diagnosed with, treated for and surviving colorectal cancer continues to rise, reproductive health concerns remain an unmet need within this growing patient population. Funding from this NCI MERIT award directly supports our research that aims to close this gap and ultimately lead to incorporating reproductive health care into routine clinical management of early-onset colorectal cancer and to improve our patient outcomes,' Holowatyj said."</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Wed, 19 Jul 2023 19:10:31 +0000 kopcol 142 at https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab JCO After Hours Podcast: Racial/Ethnic Differences Discovered in Multigene Germline Testing of Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab/news-media/jco-after-hours-podcast-racialethnic-differences-discovered-multigene-germline-testing <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">JCO After Hours Podcast: Racial/Ethnic Differences Discovered in Multigene Germline Testing of Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/holowatyj-lab/users/kopcol" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kopcol</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 07/13/2023 - 11:19</span> <a href="/holowatyj-lab/blog-post-rss/141" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to JCO After Hours Podcast: Racial/Ethnic Differences Discovered in Multigene Germline Testing of Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-external-url field--type-link field--label-hidden field__item"><a href="https://jcopodcast.libsyn.com/racialethnic-differences-discovered-in-multigene-germline-testing-of-early-onset-colorectal-cancer" target="_blank">https://jcopodcast.libsyn.com/racialethnic-differences-discovered-in-multigene-germline-testing-of-early-onset-colorectal-cancer</a></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Dr. Shannon Westin and her guest, Dr. Andreana Holowatyj, discuss the paper "<a href="https://ascopubs.org/doi/full/10.1200/JCO.22.02378">Clinical Multigene Panel Testing Identifies Racial and Ethnic Differences in Germline Pathogenic Variants Among Patients With Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer</a>," recently published in JCO.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Thu, 13 Jul 2023 16:19:32 +0000 kopcol 141 at https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab Early-onset colorectal cancer germline genetic differences identified by race, ethnicity https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab/news-media/early-onset-colorectal-cancer-germline-genetic-differences-identified-race-ethnicity <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Early-onset colorectal cancer germline genetic differences identified by race, ethnicity</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/holowatyj-lab/users/kopcol" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kopcol</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 07/07/2023 - 09:07</span> <a href="/holowatyj-lab/blog-post-rss/140" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Early-onset colorectal cancer germline genetic differences identified by race, ethnicity"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-author field--type-string field--label-hidden field__item">Tom Wilemon</div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-external-url field--type-link field--label-hidden field__item"><a href="https://medicalxpress.com/news/2023-06-early-onset-colorectal-cancer-germline-genetic.html" target="_blank">https://medicalxpress.com/news/2023-06-early-onset-colorectal-cancer-germline-genetic.html</a></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>'"As the incidence rates of early-onset colorectal cancer continue to rise and yield a disproportionate impact across diverse populations, our findings draw timely attention to the need for health equity considerations in multi-gene panel testing development,' said the study's corresponding author, Andreana Holowatyj, Ph.D., MSCI, assistant professor of Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center."</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 07 Jul 2023 14:07:47 +0000 kopcol 140 at https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab Clinical Multigene Panel Testing Identifies Racial and Ethnic Differences in Germline Pathogenic Variants Among Patients With Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab/news-media/clinical-multigene-panel-testing-identifies-racial-and-ethnic-differences-germline <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Clinical Multigene Panel Testing Identifies Racial and Ethnic Differences in Germline Pathogenic Variants Among Patients With Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/holowatyj-lab/users/kopcol" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kopcol</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 06/15/2023 - 15:40</span> <a href="/holowatyj-lab/blog-post-rss/139" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Clinical Multigene Panel Testing Identifies Racial and Ethnic Differences in Germline Pathogenic Variants Among Patients With Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-external-url field--type-link field--label-hidden field__item"><a href="https://ascopubs.org/doi/full/10.1200/JCO.22.02378" target="_blank">https://ascopubs.org/doi/full/10.1200/JCO.22.02378</a></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>"Germline genetic features differed by race/ethnicity in young patients with CRC, suggesting that current multigene panel tests may not be representative of EOCRC risk in diverse populations. Further study is needed to optimize genes selected for genetic testing in EOCRC via ancestry-specific gene and variant discovery to yield equitable clinical benefits for all patients and to mitigate inequities in disease burden." - Dr. Holowatyj and colleagues </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Thu, 15 Jun 2023 20:40:47 +0000 kopcol 139 at https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab Investigators Struggle to Understand Causes Behind Growth of Appendix Cancer https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab/news-media/investigators-struggle-understand-causes-behind-growth-appendix-cancer <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Investigators Struggle to Understand Causes Behind Growth of Appendix Cancer</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/holowatyj-lab/users/kopcol" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kopcol</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 05/04/2023 - 09:42</span> <a href="/holowatyj-lab/blog-post-rss/138" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Investigators Struggle to Understand Causes Behind Growth of Appendix Cancer"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-external-url field--type-link field--label-hidden field__item"><a href="https://www.onclive.com/view/investigators-struggle-to-understand-causes-behind-growth-of-appendix-cancer" target="_blank">https://www.onclive.com/view/investigators-struggle-to-understand-causes-behind-growth-of-appendix-cancer</a></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>“My team conducted a few studies, particularly one that wanted to look at the burden of appendix cancers in young adults,” she said. “And what we strikingly found there was that, in contrast to the fact that about 1 in every 5 colorectal cancer patients is diagnosed before the age of 50, we found that 1 in every 3 [30.8%] appendix cancer patients are diagnosed before age 50.4. Noting this really disproportionate burden in younger patients really spurred a lot of the subsequent work that my lab has done and continues to do."</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Thu, 04 May 2023 14:42:27 +0000 kopcol 138 at https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab Seeking Clues to Early-onset Colorectal Cancer https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab/news-media/seeking-clues-early-onset-colorectal-cancer <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Seeking Clues to Early-onset Colorectal Cancer</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/holowatyj-lab/users/kellesr2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kellesr2</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 03/24/2023 - 10:59</span> <a href="/holowatyj-lab/blog-post-rss/137" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Seeking Clues to Early-onset Colorectal Cancer"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-external-url field--type-link field--label-hidden field__item"><a href="https://www.aacr.org/blog/2023/03/15/seeking-clues-to-early-onset-colorectal-cancer/?utm_medium=twitter&amp;utm_source=social&amp;sf175949925=1" target="_blank">https://www.aacr.org/blog/2023/03/15/seeking-clues-to-early-onset-colorectal-cancer/?utm_medium=twitter&amp;utm_source=social&amp;sf175949925=1</a></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Understanding the biological underpinnings of early-onset colorectal cancer has been a major focus of Andreana N. Holowatyj, PhD, MS, assistant professor of medicine and cancer biology at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center. In a study published this month in AACR journal <em>Cancer Discovery, </em>Holowatyj and colleagues explained that while the cause of early-onset colorectal cancer is unknown, multiple factors likely contribute, including diet, social determinants of health, and genetics.  </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 24 Mar 2023 15:59:13 +0000 kellesr2 137 at https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab Racial/ethnic and sex differences in somatic cancer gene mutations among patients with early-onset colorectal cancer https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab/news-media/racialethnic-and-sex-differences-somatic-cancer-gene-mutations-among-patients-early <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Racial/ethnic and sex differences in somatic cancer gene mutations among patients with early-onset colorectal cancer </span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/holowatyj-lab/users/kellesr2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">kellesr2</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 12/15/2022 - 12:43</span> <a href="/holowatyj-lab/blog-post-rss/136" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Racial/ethnic and sex differences in somatic cancer gene mutations among patients with early-onset colorectal cancer "> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-external-url field--type-link field--label-hidden field__item"><a href="https://aacrjournals.org/cancerdiscovery/article-abstract/doi/10.1158/2159-8290.CD-22-0764/711679/Racial-ethnic-and-sex-differences-in-somatic?redirectedFrom=fulltext" target="_blank">https://aacrjournals.org/cancerdiscovery/article-abstract/doi/10.1158/2159-8290.CD-22-0764/711679/Racial-ethnic-and-sex-differences-in-somatic?redirectedFrom=fulltext</a></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>There were significant differences for LRP1B, FLT4, FBXW7, RNF43, ATRX, APC and PIK3CA mutation frequencies in early-onset non-hypermutated CRCs between racial/ethnic groups. Heterogeneities by race/ethnicity were observed for the effect of APC, FLT4 and FAT1 between early-onset and late-onset non-hypermutated CRC. By sex, heterogeneity was observed for the effect of EP300, BRAF, WRN, KRAS, AXIN2 and SMAD2. Males and females with non-hypermutated CRC had different trends in EP300 mutations by age group. These findings define genomic patterns of early-onset non-hypermutated CRC by race/ethnicity and sex, which yields novel biological clues into early-onset CRC disparities.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Thu, 15 Dec 2022 18:43:06 +0000 kellesr2 136 at https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab Holowatyj named chair of scientific advisory board for ACPMP Research Foundation https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab/news-media/holowatyj-named-chair-scientific-advisory-board-acpmp-research-foundation <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Holowatyj named chair of scientific advisory board for ACPMP Research Foundation</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/holowatyj-lab/users/ratangb" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ratangb</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 07/14/2022 - 11:15</span> <a href="/holowatyj-lab/blog-post-rss/135" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Holowatyj named chair of scientific advisory board for ACPMP Research Foundation"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-external-url field--type-link field--label-hidden field__item"><a href="https://news.vumc.org/2022/07/15/holowatyj-named-chair-of-scientific-advisory-board-for-acpmp-research-foundation/" target="_blank">https://news.vumc.org/2022/07/15/holowatyj-named-chair-of-scientific-advisory-board-for-acpmp-research-foundation/</a></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>“The Appendix Cancer Pseudomyxoma Peritonei Research Foundation has delivered immeasurable support to patients and scientists alike for nearly 15 years, and I am honored that the foundation has entrusted me with this inaugural role. My vision for the Scientific Advisory Board is to serve as an impetus to propel a new era of scientific discovery and innovation toward a cure for appendix cancer and pseudomyxoma peritonei for our patients and families,” said Dr. Andreana Holowatyj.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-full-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img loading="lazy" src="/holowatyj-lab/sites/default/files/styles/barista_posts_full_image/public/Holowatyj%20Headshot.jpeg?itok=I2dn1XVR" width="300" height="309" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-barista-posts-full-image" /> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Thu, 14 Jul 2022 16:15:05 +0000 ratangb 135 at https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab Rare appendiceal cancer affecting younger adults https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab/news-media/rare-appendiceal-cancer-affecting-younger-adults-0 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Rare appendiceal cancer affecting younger adults</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/holowatyj-lab/users/hansocj2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">hansocj2</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 07/08/2022 - 15:16</span> <a href="/holowatyj-lab/blog-post-rss/134" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Rare appendiceal cancer affecting younger adults"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-external-url field--type-link field--label-hidden field__item"><a href="https://discover.vumc.org/2022/06/rare-appendiceal-cancer-affecting-younger-adults/" target="_blank">https://discover.vumc.org/2022/06/rare-appendiceal-cancer-affecting-younger-adults/</a></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h3>Scientists are focused on identifying genetic and environmental contributors of appendix cancer as incidence rises.</h3> <p>Colorectal cancer rates have been declining in older adults, and <a href="https://discover.vumc.org/2022/03/youthful-presentation-may-obscure-diagnosis-in-early-onset-colorectal-cancer/">on the rise in younger adults</a>. Trends in appendiceal cancer tell a different story, with rates for all age groups on a steep upward trajectory, growing <a href="https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.32793" rel="noopener" target="_blank">232 percent</a> between 2000 and 2016.</p> <p>Perhaps because this malignancy is rare, with approximately <a href="https://www.mdanderson.org/cancerwise/4-appendix-cancer-questions-answered.h00-159463212.html" rel="noopener" target="_blank">3,000</a> each year in the United States, the disease is understudied and is often presumed to share etiology and other characteristics with colorectal cancers.</p> <p><a href="https://medicine.vumc.org/person/andreana-natalie-holowatyj-phd-msci" rel="noopener" target="_blank">Andreana Holowatyj, Ph.D.</a>, an epidemiologist and molecular biologist at Vanderbilt University Medical Center <a href="https://discover.vumc.org/2021/02/geographic-variation-in-womens-colorectal-cancer-survival/">studying gastrointestinal cancers</a>, says this assumption is being disproven.</p> <p>“Appendiceal tumors harbor different molecular features from colorectal cancers,” she said. “They present and spread differently, don’t respond to the chemotherapy most colorectal tumors do, and they disproportionately affect younger adults. These cancers shouldn’t be conflated with those of cecal origin, particularly in tumor registries.”</p> <h2>Challenges for Diagnosis and Treatment</h2> <p>In the majority of cases, appendix cancer is discovered upon pathological evaluation of an appendectomy specimen when patients present with signs and symptoms for acute appendicitis. Often, this late discovery is made after the cancer has spread into the peritoneal cavity, Holowatyj said.</p> <p>The potential misclassification of appendix cancer as a colon tumor is an obstacle to discovering disease-specific risk factors and tumor biomarkers, which has implications for risk assessment, screening, and surveillance, as well as treatment. With non-operative management of appendicitis becoming more common, Holowatyj is concerned that cases of appendix cancer may be missed for lack of occult tumors.</p> <p>Appendiceal tumors may present as abdominal hernias, or fibroids, cysts or endometriosis in young women who experience pain or swelling/girth enlargement.</p> <p>“Sometimes tumors are found in both the ovary and the appendix given proximity, and it is difficult to determine tumor origin versus site of disease spread,” she said.</p> <p>Durable treatment options for patients with appendix cancer are still limited.</p> <p>“A relatively small subgroup with appendiceal tumors of a particular histology may benefit from cytoreductive surgery and <a href="https://discover.vumc.org/2021/02/resetting-the-clock-for-patients-with-peritoneal-malignancies/">HIPEC</a> [hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy],” she said. “Chemotherapy may help some patients, but generally does not have a curative or enduring benefit.”</p> <h2>A Population-based Study</h2> <p>With the rates of appendectomies remaining relatively constant, the steep rise in rates of appendix cancer and high proportion of younger patients is an entreaty for greater understanding. While approximately one in 10 colorectal cancer patients is under 50 years of age at diagnosis, Holowatyj discovered that the early-onset cancer burden sharply rises to <a href="https://aacrjournals.org/cebp/article/30/6/1149/670818/Histologic-and-Racial-Ethnic-Patterns-of" rel="noopener" target="_blank">one in three for appendix cancer</a>.</p> <p>Holowatyj first set out to characterize the burden of appendix cancer among young adults. She used the NIH’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) cancer registries to identify 1,652 patients diagnosed with appendix cancer between the ages of 20 and 49 over a 12-year period. Her findings, reported in <a href="https://doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2020.06.011" rel="noopener" target="_blank"><em>Gastroenterology</em></a><em>, </em>revealed five-year overall survival rates of 63 percent for non-Hispanic Black patients, 75.5 percent for non-Hispanic White patients, and 75.4 percent for Hispanic patients.</p> <p>Histological subtype significantly differed by race/ethnicity, with non-mucinous appendiceal adenocarcinomas more frequent among Black patients compared with White and Hispanic individuals. Among those under age 50 with appendix cancer, nearly 20 percent were diagnosed with advanced stage disease (stage III/IV), and about 12 percent reported additional cancer diagnoses. Among young patients with mucinous and non-mucinous appendiceal adenocarcinoma, men had significantly lower survival rates than women.</p> <h2>Diving into the Genetics</h2> <p>Her team also found tumor-specific gene mutations that are not all typically observed in colorectal tumors. In a study published in <a href="https://doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.28644" rel="noopener" target="_blank"><em>JAMA Network Open</em></a>, Holowatyj and colleagues revealed a distinct prevalence and spectrum of <a href="https://discover.vumc.org/2021/02/genomic-patterns-of-early-onset-appendiceal-cancer/">non-silent mutations in appendiceal tumors</a> of patients age younger than 50 versus 50 years and older, setting the stage for the development of potential therapeutic modalities that target these unique molecular features.</p> <p>While it is commonly thought that <a href="https://moffitt.org/cancers/appendiceal-appendix-cancer/faqs/is-appendix-cancer-hereditary/" rel="noopener" target="_blank">appendiceal cancer risk may not be heritable</a>, Holowatyj thinks that this may not be the case. Her group is currently undertaking several <a href="https://www.vumc.org/gapcancerstudy" rel="noopener" target="_blank">studies exploring inherited gene mutations in appendix cancer</a>, with their initial findings being reviewed for publication later this year.</p> <p>“We hypothesize that health behaviors, <a href="https://discover.vumc.org/2022/02/assessing-the-southern-environment-and-cancer-risk/">potential environmental exposures</a>, inherited and tumor-specific gene mutations, and gene–environment interactions may all contribute to heterogeneity in appendix cancer susceptibility and outcomes, as well as disease-specific disparities,” she said.</p> <h2>Future Investigations</h2> <p>In addition to her work to unravel a genetic link to appendix cancer, Holowatyj is probing for disease-specific risk factors for this malignancy, as well as aiming to improve the biological basis of disparities in early-onset cases. </p> <p>“As a rare cancer, appendix cancer garners limited attention. Our team is passionately committed to driving marked advances in our understanding of this disease for our patients,” Holowatyj said.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 08 Jul 2022 20:16:03 +0000 hansocj2 134 at https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab Improving outcomes for patients with appendiceal cancer https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab/news-media/improving-outcomes-patients-appendiceal-cancer <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Improving outcomes for patients with appendiceal cancer</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/holowatyj-lab/users/hansocj2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">hansocj2</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 07/08/2022 - 15:14</span> <a href="/holowatyj-lab/blog-post-rss/133" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Improving outcomes for patients with appendiceal cancer"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-external-url field--type-link field--label-hidden field__item"><a href="https://www.targetedonc.com/view/improving-outcomes-for-patients-with-appendiceal-cancer" target="_blank">https://www.targetedonc.com/view/improving-outcomes-for-patients-with-appendiceal-cancer</a></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Andreana Holowatyj, PhD, MSCI, assistant professor of Medicine and Cancer Biology, Epidemiology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, discusses the key takeaway for community oncologists about early-onset appendiceal cancer.</p> <p>With the limited information regarding the risk factors and etiologies of appendiceal cancer available, oncologists consider the issue to be the cause of the growing increase of early on-set cases in the United States.</p> <p>Holowatyj notes that one must consider this type of cancer as a distinct disease, different from colon cancer as the potential misclassification of appendiceal cancer only makes it harder for patients and oncologists to understand the unique characteristics of the disease. Remaining aware of the differences between these 2 types of cancers allows individuals to better classify and understand each of them in order to make clinical, therapeutic and epidemiological advancements in the future.</p> <p><strong>Transcription:</strong></p> <p><strong>0:08 | </strong>Given the alarming increase that we're seeing in appendiceal cancer incidents, we don't understand why. With these undetermined causes, these distinct patterns and disparities and disease outcomes that our team has discovered, particularly among young individuals, is really critical to accurately diagnose and distinguish these malignancies. I've mentioned the potential misclassification of appendiceal cancer as colon cancer really introduces barriers to us to discover disease specific risk factors, potential tumor biomarkers, and that has implications and risk assessment surveillance screening as well as treatment.</p> <p><strong>0:51 | </strong>Moreover, given the trend towards more non-operative management of appendicitis, gastroenterologists and surgeons should keep appendiceal tumors in the differential diagnosis of young patients that present in this matter, and possibly consider a lower threshold for performing appendectomy to exclude malignancy overall. I think these findings have really emphasized that appendiceal tumors should not be conflated with those of sequel origin, particularly in tumor registries, but yet set the foundation for future studies that really seek to drive our understanding of this malignancy and rising disease burden further.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 08 Jul 2022 20:14:29 +0000 hansocj2 133 at https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab New fund supports appendiceal cancer research https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab/news-media/new-fund-supports-appendiceal-cancer-research-0 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">New fund supports appendiceal cancer research</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/holowatyj-lab/users/hansocj2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">hansocj2</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 07/08/2022 - 14:59</span> <a href="/holowatyj-lab/blog-post-rss/132" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to New fund supports appendiceal cancer research"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-external-url field--type-link field--label-hidden field__item"><a href="https://news.vumc.org/2022/01/27/new-fund-supports-appendiceal-cancer-research/" target="_blank">https://news.vumc.org/2022/01/27/new-fund-supports-appendiceal-cancer-research/</a></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The newly established Dalton Family Foundation Appendix Cancer Research Fund will support investigations by the Division of Epidemiology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center to better understand this rare malignancy.</p> <p>An initial grant from the Dalton Family Foundation will fund the work of Andreana Holowatyj, PhD, MSCI, assistant professor of Medicine, and colleagues, to identify a hereditary link to appendiceal cancer.</p> <p>Appendiceal cancer is very rare, affecting about one or two people per million annually. However, the cancer is becoming more common for reasons that are not known.</p> <p>Last year, Holowatyj and colleagues conducted the first study of appendiceal cancer patterns and survival by race/ethnicity among patients younger than 50 in the U.S. They found poorer disease outcomes among non-Hispanic Blacks compared to non-Hispanic whites, and among men compared with women.</p> <p>That study, which was published in <em>Gastroenterology</em>, was followed by another investigation led by Holowatyj that compared the molecular landscapes of early-onset and late-onset appendiceal cancer. The second study, published in <em>JAMA Network Open</em>, revealed distinct non-silent mutations in the tumors of younger patients, setting the stage for the development of potential therapeutic advances.</p> <p>A third study, published in <em>Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers &amp; Prevention</em>, revealed that one in every three cases of appendiceal cancer occurs in people under age 50 and that these early onset cases have distinct clinical features from those that occur in people over age 50.</p> <p>The grant supports the next step in Holowatyj’s investigations. She and colleagues will utilize genetics data for patients with appendix cancer to examine the prevalence and spectrum of germline mutations in genes that are linked to an increased lifetime risk for any cancer. They will also search for potential new appendix cancer susceptibility genes by sequencing DNA samples donated by hundreds of appendiceal cancer patients. The findings may help medical professionals identify patients who may benefit from early detection and appendix cancer prevention strategies.</p> <p>“This grant by the Dalton Family Foundation to support Dr. Holowatyj’s investigations is part of a broader initiative that is funding innovative early-stage research in appendiceal cancer at VUMC, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center,” Mark Dalton said on behalf of the foundation. “It is our hope that early-stage research and collaboration across these premier medical institutions and outstanding scientists will accelerate our understanding and treatment of this rare cancer.”</p> <p>The burden of rare cancers is magnified due to limited research resources and their cumulative effect. Rare cancers, including primary tumors of the appendix, account for one-quarter of all cancer-related deaths.</p> <p>“Due to the challenges associated with studying this rare malignancy, many fundamental questions related to appendix cancer etiology and biology remain unanswered. Is there a genetic susceptibility to appendix cancer? Due to the generosity of the Dalton Family Foundation, that’s a question we are well on our way to answering today,” said Holowatyj.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 08 Jul 2022 19:59:27 +0000 hansocj2 132 at https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab What oncologists should know about appendiceal cancer https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab/news-media/what-oncologists-should-know-about-appendiceal-cancer <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">What oncologists should know about appendiceal cancer</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/holowatyj-lab/users/hansocj2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">hansocj2</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 07/08/2022 - 14:58</span> <a href="/holowatyj-lab/blog-post-rss/131" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to What oncologists should know about appendiceal cancer"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-external-url field--type-link field--label-hidden field__item"><a href="https://www.targetedonc.com/view/what-oncologists-should-know-about-appendiceal-cancer" target="_blank">https://www.targetedonc.com/view/what-oncologists-should-know-about-appendiceal-cancer</a></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><em>Andreana Holowatyj, PhD, MSCI, discusses the characteristics of appendiceal cancer and what differentiates it from colorectal cancer.</em></p> <p><em>Andreana</em> Holowatyj, PhD, MSCI, assistant professor of Medicine and Cancer Biology, Epidemiology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, discusses the characteristics of appendiceal cancer and what differentiates it from colorectal cancer.</p> <p>Appendiceal cancer is unlike any other cancer. In an interview, Holowatyj explained that the disease has a unique molecular make up and little is known about causes, predictors, and prognostics for appendiceal cancer.</p> <h4>Transcription:</h4> <p>Appendiceal cancer is a unique malignancy because these cases are often discovered in an acute situation, meaning that we see appendiceal tumors incidentally found in about nearly 10% of cases undergoing a routine appendectomy. Often presenting as appendicitis. And so we do not understand the role of obesity and appendiceal cancer risk or outcomes are really detailed risk factors contributing to this disease burden across all ages and particularly among young patients.</p> <p>Obesity and age have been reported in initial studies to be predictors of pathological cancer diagnosis after an appendectomy but yet we still do not understand risk factors for this malignancy, which is a bit prohibitive and understanding risk management and prevention guidelines for this population. So, I think of course, early disease detection and care for this malignancy as well as considering that it is its own distinct etiology and cancer type is I think, going to be the most important to help us really healed advances in this tumor type.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 08 Jul 2022 19:58:22 +0000 hansocj2 131 at https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab Survival disparities identified in real-world patients with appendiceal cancer https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab/news-media/survival-disparities-identified-real-world-patients-appendiceal-cancer <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Survival disparities identified in real-world patients with appendiceal cancer</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/holowatyj-lab/users/hansocj2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">hansocj2</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 07/08/2022 - 14:56</span> <a href="/holowatyj-lab/blog-post-rss/130" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Survival disparities identified in real-world patients with appendiceal cancer"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-external-url field--type-link field--label-hidden field__item"><a href="https://www.targetedonc.com/view/survival-disparities-identified-in-real-world-patients-with-appendiceal-cancer" target="_blank">https://www.targetedonc.com/view/survival-disparities-identified-in-real-world-patients-with-appendiceal-cancer</a></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Oncologists have limited information about the risk factors and etiologies of appendiceal cancer, which is an issue considering the growing increase of early on-set cases in the United States. </p> <p>Research shows that between 2006 and 2020, early-onset appendiceal cancer occurrence has increased by 232%. Based on the high increase, investigators set out to determine what factors may be contributing, including race and ethnicity. Specifically, a study used data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Ed Results database to look at survival outcomes across race and ethnic subgroups of patients with appendiceal cancer.</p> <p>In an interview with Targeted Oncology<sup>TM</sup>, Andreana Holowatyj, PhD, MSCI, assistant professor of Medicine and Cancer Biology, Epidemiology, delved into the growing issue of early-onset appendiceal cancer, how it impacts certain groups, and what efforts can improve outcomes for these patients in the future.</p> <p><strong>Can you talk about the rarity of this disease and how you think that impacts treatment options?</strong></p> <p><strong>Holowatyj</strong>: Appendiceal cancer is a rare malignancy, and has an age adjusted incidence rate of about 0.12 per million person years. As a consequence of the rarity of this malignancy, there are challenges and significant advances in the discovery and understanding of risk factors disease, biology, and epidemiology. This also presents challenges in understanding disease pathogenesis, which is needed to develop clinical management guidelines. So currently, the guidelines from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommend a hemicolectomy followed by adjuvant chemotherapy as definitive treatment for early-stage appendiceal cancers. The guidelines are very similar to colon cancer guidelines, largely because there's a lack of robust data for appendix cancer. These treatment regimens are also extrapolated from clinical studies related to colon cancer.</p> <p><strong>What led to your study of survival outcomes in patients with early-onset appendiceal cancer in the United States?</strong></p> <p>So, there is a rising disease burden for early-onset cancers, which are cancers diagnosed among adults aged 18 to 49 years, sort of across the board. We're seeing an increased incidence of breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, multiple other obesity-related cancers. Many have likely heard about the increasing incidence of early-onset colorectal cancer, which has garnered much attention with recent recommendations to lower the screening age to 45 years for individuals at average risk. </p> <p>In early 2020, there was an elegant study that was published demonstrating that among patients of all ages diagnosed with malignant appendiceal cancers, we've seen an increase of incidence rates about 232% in the United States between 2002 1016, and we're seeing some of these rates rise from older to younger generations. With my research program at Vanderbilt, we're focused on the distinct disease burden of early-onset cancers, including biology, disparities, and survivorship. So, this was an intriguing observation for us particularly given the rates of appendectomies, which often lead to a diagnosis of incidental appendix cancer remained stable over this time period. And so, we really wanted to create the field of early-onset appendix cancer to understand this distinct disease burden. One of the biggest challenges for us is that there's often a potential for misclassification of appendiceal cancer for malignancies of the colon. It's important to differentiate these malignancies that are starting to show distinct molecular characteristics and consider appendiceal cancer as its own tumor type, in order to be able to close these gaps and understand epidemiology and risk factors. The better clinical management guidelines can be developed that are specific to this population, and ultimately improve patient and clinical outcomes overall.</p> <p><strong>How was information from the SEER database used to conduct this study?</strong></p> <p>The reason we turn to the NCI’s SEER program was because we could leverage population-based cancer registry data that covers about almost a third of the United States population. That really gave us a strategic advantage when studying a rare malignancy, such as appendiceal cancer, because we were able to leverage robust and gold standard registry data from all across the country and with sufficient cases to be able to look at differences in disease patterns, as well as disease outcomes. Our observation of disparities in survival among patients with early-onset appendix cancer was able to be explored and identified with SEER.</p> <p><strong>Why was it important to strategy patients by race and ethnicity?</strong></p> <p>It’s really important for me to point out and highlight that race is a social construct. So, the use of genetic ancestry data to be able to look at differences by genetic ancestry is ideal. But in the absence of this data, we really wanted to understand whether there were disparities in survival across these groups. This really is relevant to and builds upon my previous finding in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, which shows racial-ethnic disparities and survival among young patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma. So, as a first step, we really wanted to understand were their survival disparities in this population of young patients with appendiceal cancer, and then what may be contributing to these differences in survival that we observed in subsequent studies and next steps?</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Can you explain the findings of the analysis?</strong></p> <p>Our observation of disparities and survival among adults diagnosed with early-onset appendix cancer revealed that there are significantly poorer disease outcomes among nonHispanic Black individuals compared with nonHispanic Whites and among men compared with women. This was really striking to us overall because these findings really emphasize the importance of early detection and diagnosis given the rise in disease burden. And the survival difference observed by race or ethnicity among young patients with appendiceal cancer, in turn, may be partly attributed to differences in socioeconomic status by race and ethnicity, which could attribute to the variation in diagnostic or surgical procedures, such as undergoing an appendectomy versus getting antibiotic therapy for patients with acute appendicitis, or potential differences in access to health care. But findings in our study showed that young nonHispanic Blacks with early-onset appendiceal cancer have a similar socioeconomic status to young Hispanics, and presumably, experience comparable barriers, and access to health care is important because we actually observe no differences in survival between young Hispanics and young nonHispanic Whites with appendiceal cancer, which was similar to our findings in early-onset colorectal cancer.</p> <p> </p> <p>So, although these factors may indeed impact survival rates among patients with early-onset appendiceal cancer, they certainly do not completely explain the survival difference we observed between Blacks and other racial or ethnic groups. So hopefully, in future studies, we can determine the extent to which health behaviors environmental exposures and molecular characteristics may contribute to this heterogeneity in outcomes by race and ethnicity among patients with appendiceal cancer.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Since your research was published, other studies have looked into this subject matter. What is important to highlight about these studies collectively?</strong></p> <p>I this study, as well as in our other studies, we consistently observed that in contrast to the finding that about 1 in every 10 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer is younger than age 50, we actually see a very different demography in appendix cancer, where approximately 1 in every 3 individuals diagnosed with appendiceal cancer is younger than age 50. This is really important because it suggests that in proportion to the overall disease burden, there's a higher proportion of early-onset cases for appendiceal cancer, and really is important to consider given the young individuals have a very different challenges throughout their cancer journey and have other life domains that can be impacted by cancer diagnosis that need to be addressed overall. </p> <p> </p> <p>From the molecular perspective, we also were able to use consortium data to explore somatic mutations and appendiceal cancer by age at disease sequencing and observed distinct molecular characteristics and tumors of individuals diagnosed with early-onset appendix cancer compared with late onset disease. This is intriguing because there's potential clinical relevance and therapeutic implications that may be seen in follow-up studies and further causal investigations to understand some of the mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis. But overall, these studies focus on shedding light on this rare malignancy that has an increasing disease burden in really trying to not only understand disease pathogenesis, to improve clinical management and clinical care guidelines, but also to identify individuals who may be at higher risk or address care needs of individuals after this disease diagnosis and are pointing to distinct patterns of disease across age groups.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>What is your key takeaway for community oncologists about early-onset appendiceal cancer?</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>I think the biggest takeaway and message particularly for this rare malignancy that has a growing disease burden is to consider appendix cancer as a distinct disease separate from colon cancer. The potential misclassification of appendiceal cancer as malignancies of the colon makes it challenging for us to better understand the unique molecular and clinical characteristics and patterns of this malignancy, as well as understand factors that contribute to differences in disease outcomes. By understanding that appendiceal cancer is a distinct malignancy from tumors located in the right side of the colon. This will really help us to best classify these cases and better understand the unique characteristics of this malignancy in order to translate that into significant advances clinically, therapeutically, and epidemiologically for this population.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 08 Jul 2022 19:56:45 +0000 hansocj2 130 at https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab Genetic differences may partly explain racial/ethnic disparities in early-onset colorectal cancer https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab/news-media/genetic-differences-may-partly-explain-racialethnic-disparities-early-onset-colorectal-0 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Genetic differences may partly explain racial/ethnic disparities in early-onset colorectal cancer</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/holowatyj-lab/users/hansocj2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">hansocj2</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 07/08/2022 - 14:56</span> <a href="/holowatyj-lab/blog-post-rss/129" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Genetic differences may partly explain racial/ethnic disparities in early-onset colorectal cancer"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-external-url field--type-link field--label-hidden field__item"><a href="https://www.cancertherapyadvisor.com/home/cancer-topics/gastrointestinal-cancers/colorectal-cancer-genetic-difference-explain-racial-differences-risk/" target="_blank">https://www.cancertherapyadvisor.com/home/cancer-topics/gastrointestinal-cancers/colorectal-cancer-genetic-difference-explain-racial-differences-risk/</a></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Genomic patterns in patients with early-onset colorectal cancer (CRC) vary by race and ethnicity, according to a presentation at the 2021 AACR Virtual Special Conference: Colorectal Cancer.<sup>1</sup></p> <p>The findings highlight the need for additional research into genetic and social factors that contribute to racial and ethnic disparities in early-onset CRC, according to Andreana N. Holowatyj, PhD, of Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee, who presented the research at the meeting.</p> <p>There is urgent interest in early-onset CRC because its incidence has risen by about 1.3% per year in the past 3 decades.<sup>2</sup> In 2020, 12% of CRC diagnoses and 7% of deaths were expected in people who were younger than 50 years of age when they were diagnosed.</p> <p><strong>Distinct Biology of Early-Onset CRC</strong></p> <p>Research has shown biological differences between early-onset and later-onset CRC. In a review of more than 36,000 CRC patients, early-onset CRCs demonstrated more aggressive clinical behavior than later-onset CRCs.<sup>3</sup></p> <p>Patients with early-onset CRC were more likely to have tumors in the distal colon or rectum, synchronous metastatic disease, microsatellite instability, and fewer <em>BRAF</em> V600 mutations than CRC patients who were at least 50 years old at diagnosis.</p> <p>Patients who were younger than 30 years at diagnosis had additional histologic and molecular patterns, including signet ring histology, in comparison with those who were 30 years or older at diagnosis. </p> <p>In a prior study, Dr Holowatyj and colleagues showed that patients with early-onset CRC whose tumors were microsatellite stable had alterations in oxidative stress response and redox homeostasis that differed from what the researchers observed in patients diagnosed at older ages.<sup>4</sup> Moreover, the imbalances in antioxidant defense mechanisms could be correlated with changes in inflammatory biomarkers.</p> <p><strong>Differences by Race/Ethnicity</strong></p> <p>Research has shown a disproportionate burden of early-onset CRC among non-White individuals.<sup>5</sup> For example, the proportion of early-onset CRC cases was shown to be nearly 2-fold higher in non-White individuals.</p> <p>The disproportionate burden among various racial and ethnic populations may partly reflect changing demographics across the United States, according to Dr Holowatyj. However, clinical outcomes differentiate racial and ethnic groups of patients with early-onset CRC from one another.</p> <p>In SEER registry data, early-onset CRC survival was significantly shorter in non-Hispanic Black patients than in White patients, even for patients with the earliest stages of disease and when data were adjusted for age, poverty, sex, surgical procedure, and radiation therapy.<sup>6</sup></p> <p>The adjusted survival curves were similar for non-Hispanic White patients and Hispanic patients with stage II colon cancer, despite the similar socioeconomic status of Hispanic and non-Hispanic Black individuals in the United States.</p> <p>At least in part, these disparities may relate to distinct genomic patterns by racial and ethnic groups.</p> <p><strong>Unique Genomic Patterns</strong></p> <p>To identify genetic differences by race/ethnicity, Dr Holowatyj’s lab performed genomic analysis on tumor specimens from 6120 CRC patients from 12 centers in the Genomics Evidence Neoplasia Information Exchange (GENIE) registry.<sup>1</sup></p> <p>Patients were between the ages of 18 and 89 years when their tumors were sequenced. More than 90% of patients (n=5475) had microsatellite-stable disease, and 28.8% (n=1761) had early-onset CRC.</p> <p>In models adjusted for sex, race, histology and site, sequencing assay, sample type, and tumor mutation burden, early-onset CRC patients had a distinct genomic landscape from older-onset CRC patients. </p> <p>The early-onset patients had significantly higher odds of presenting with non-silent variations in <em>LRP1B, DOCK8, TP53</em>, and <em>TCF7L2</em> and significantly lower odds of presenting with non-silent variations in <em>KDR</em> and <em>WRN</em>.</p> <p>Furthermore, genomic profiles of early-onset CRC tumors varied by race and ethnicity.</p> <p>Notably, non-Hispanic Black patients with early-onset CRC had a 4-fold higher frequency of mutations in <em>CREBBP</em> and <em>TGFBR2</em>, compared with non-Hispanic Black patients who had late-onset CRC. This pattern was unique to the population of non-Hispanic Black patients.</p> <p>Non-Hispanic Black patients also had a higher tumor mutation burden than non-Hispanic White patients, which was seen in both early- and late-onset CRC.</p> <p>Among Asian/Pacific Islander patients, when compared with late-onset CRC, early-onset CRC was characterized by a lower frequency of mutations in <em>PIK3CA</em> and a higher frequency of mutations in <em>APC</em> and <em>FAT-1</em>. Mutations in these genes were not associated with an increased risk of early-onset CRC in non-Hispanic White patients and did not persist in the overall model.</p> <p>Non-Hispanic White patients with early-onset CRC had a greater frequency of mutations in <em>TP53 </em>and <em>SMAD2</em> but a lower frequency of mutations in <em>FLT4</em>, when compared with non-Hispanic White patients who had late-onset CRC.</p> <p>Unique <em>LRP1B, TGFBR2, APC,</em> and <em>PIK3CA</em> mutation frequencies were observed in early-onset CRC patients with microsatellite-stable tumors across all racial and ethnic groups.</p> <p>As suggested by Dr Holowatyj, investigations into the mechanisms responsible for these distinct genomic patterns in early-onset CRC are needed.</p> <p><strong>Value of Global Biobanks and Registries</strong></p> <p>The GENIE registry does not provide potentially relevant information about cancer stage, tumor grade, survival, or personal risk factors like obesity, alcohol use, or smoking exposure.</p> <p>Nonetheless, as the incidence of CRC varies widely by region, global efforts like the GENIE registry may be vital to uncovering heterogeneity in tumor biology and potential explanations for observed differences in treatment response and clinical outcome.</p> <p>Data from global tissue banks and information exchange projects like GENIE provide the statistical power to inform trial design and translational research. This is particularly important for rare cancers and rare variants of common malignancies.</p> <p>Projects like GENIE exemplify how international collaboration is critically important for investigating these complex, clinically relevant issues and how acquiring biospecimens for shared tissue banks is an investment in cancer care that can pay dividends in addressing issues that vex oncologists throughout the world.</p> <p><em>Disclosures: Dr Holowatyj disclosed funding from the National Institutes of Health, the Dalton Family Foundation, and the American Cancer Society.</em></p> <p> </p> <p><strong>References</strong></p> <p>1. Holowatyj AN. Society meets biology: Racial/ethnic disparities in early-onset colorectal cancers. Presented at AACR Colorectal Cancer 2021. October 21-22, 2021.</p> <p>2. Siegel RL, Miller KD, Sauer AG, et al. <a data-feathr-click-track="true" href="https://acsjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.3322/caac.21601" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">Colorectal Cancer Statistics, 2020</a>. <em>CA Cancer J Clin</em>. 2020;70:145-164. <a href="https://doi.org/10.3322/caac.21601">https://doi.org/10.3322/caac.21601</a></p> <p>3. Willauer AN, Liu Y, Pereira AAL, et al. <a data-feathr-click-track="true" href="https://acsjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/cncr.31994" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">Clinical and molecular characterization of early-onset colorectal cancer</a>. <em>Cancer</em>. 2019;125(12):2002–2010. doi:10.1002/cncr.31994</p> <p>4. Holowatyj AN, Gigic B, Herpel E, et al. <a data-feathr-click-track="true" href="https://www.gastrojournal.org/article/S0016-5085(19)41536-9/fulltext?referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fpubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov%2F" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">Distinct molecular phenotype of sporadic colorectal cancers among young patients based on multiomics analysis</a>. <em>Gastroenterology</em>. 2020;158(4):1155-1158.e2. doi:10.1053/j.gastro.2019.11.012 </p> <p>5. Theuer CP, Wagner JL, Taylor TH, et al. <a data-feathr-click-track="true" href="https://www.gastrojournal.org/article/S0016-5085(01)99729-X/fulltext?referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fpubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov%2F" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">Racial and ethnic colorectal cancer patterns affect the cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening in the United States</a>. <em>Gastroenterology</em>. 2001;120(4):848-56. doi:10.1053/gast.2001.22535</p> <p>6. Holowatyj AN, Ruterbusch JJ, Rozek LS, Cote ML, Stoffel EM. <a data-feathr-click-track="true" href="https://ascopubs.org/doi/10.1200/JCO.2015.65.0994" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">Racial/ethnic disparities in survival among patients with young-onset colorectal cancer</a>. <em>J Clin Oncol</em>. 2016;34(18):2148-56. doi:10.1200/JCO.2015.65.0994 </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 08 Jul 2022 19:56:01 +0000 hansocj2 129 at https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab DNA Discoveries Podcast: Go Boldly: Stigma, the gut, and young adult colon cancer https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab/news-media/dna-discoveries-podcast-go-boldly-stigma-gut-and-young-adult-colon-cancer-0 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">DNA Discoveries Podcast: Go Boldly: Stigma, the gut, and young adult colon cancer</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/holowatyj-lab/users/hansocj2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">hansocj2</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 07/08/2022 - 14:55</span> <a href="/holowatyj-lab/blog-post-rss/128" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to DNA Discoveries Podcast: Go Boldly: Stigma, the gut, and young adult colon cancer"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-external-url field--type-link field--label-hidden field__item"><a href="https://discover.vumc.org/podcasts/go-boldly-stigma-the-gut-and-young-adult-colon-cancer/" target="_blank">https://discover.vumc.org/podcasts/go-boldly-stigma-the-gut-and-young-adult-colon-cancer/</a></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><a href="https://medicine.vumc.org/person/andreana-natalie-holowatyj-phd-msci" rel="noopener" target="_blank">Andreana Holowatyj</a>, PhD, MSCI, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Cancer Biology at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, studies the gastrointestinal cancer burdens in adults under the age of 50 and the health disparities of those diseases. She and her team have mapped out hotspots for younger adults with colon cancer and like many others is working to understand what’s going on.</p> <p>Of those who get diagnosed with colorectal cancer, 1 in 10 are under the age of 50. And young men have worse survival rates than young women.</p> <p>“To put that into perspective, for African-Americans about one in every eight African-Americans is diagnosed before age 50. I think that really illustrates that early onset course of cancer is not just one disease, that there are disparities, differences in patterns that could impact disease risk and outcomes that we continue to try and understand,” said Holowatyj. “There is a stigma associated with talking about colorectal cancer and that people sometimes think it’s a disease for older people and that it can’t impact young people. And that’s a really important and urgent stigma to break.”</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 08 Jul 2022 19:55:02 +0000 hansocj2 128 at https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab Spectrum of somatic cancer gene variations among adults with appendiceal cancer by age https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab/news-media/spectrum-somatic-cancer-gene-variations-among-adults-appendiceal-cancer-age <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Spectrum of somatic cancer gene variations among adults with appendiceal cancer by age</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/holowatyj-lab/users/hansocj2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">hansocj2</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 07/08/2022 - 14:54</span> <a href="/holowatyj-lab/blog-post-rss/127" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Spectrum of somatic cancer gene variations among adults with appendiceal cancer by age"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-external-url field--type-link field--label-hidden field__item"><a href="https://oncologytube.com/video/39762/andreana-n.-holowatyj-ph.d.-drholowatyj-vumc_cancer-carcinoma-cancer-research-spectrum-of-somatic-cancer-gene-variations-among-adults-with-appendiceal-cancer?channelName=cancernewsupdate#gsc.tab=0" target="_blank">https://oncologytube.com/video/39762/andreana-n.-holowatyj-ph.d.-drholowatyj-vumc_cancer-carcinoma-cancer-research-spectrum-of-somatic-cancer-gene-variations-among-adults-with-appendiceal-cancer?channelName=cancernewsupdate#gsc.tab=0</a></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Significance:<br /> The incidence of appendiceal cancer (AC) is growing with unknown etiologies, especially among individuals younger than 50 years of age (early onset of AC). In patients with early-onset AC, the unique spectrum of somatic cancer gene variations is largely undetermined.<br /><br /><br /> Target:<br /> To classify the frequency of somatic variations and genomic trends in early-onset (&amp;lt;50 years of age) vs late-onset (&amp;lt;50 years of age) AC patients.<br /><br /> Plan, environment, and participants: This cohort study included individuals diagnosed with pathologically confirmed AC aged 18 years and older. The International Clinicogenomic Data Sharing Consortium American Association for Cancer Research Project Genomics Proof Neoplasia Knowledge Exchange reported cases with clinical-grade targeted sequencing data from January 1, 2011, to December 31, 2019. (GENIE). From May to September 2020, data analysis was performed.<br /><br /><br /><br /> Exposures: Exposures<br /> Age at onset of illness.<br /><br /> Key results and measures: The prevalence and range of somatic variance are determined in patients with AC. Using multivariable logistic regression with adjustment for sex, race/ethnicity, histological subtype, sequencing core, and sample type, variance comparisons were examined between early-onset and late-onset AC.<br /><br /><br /><br /> Outcomes:<br /> A total of 385 individuals with AC were included in this study (mean [SD] age at diagnosis, 56.0 [12.4] years; 187 [48.6 percent] males; 306 [79.5 percent] non-Hispanic White individuals), and 109 patients (28.3 percent) were diagnosed with early-onset AC. Race/ethnicity ranged by age at disease onset; a greater proportion of early-onset versus late-onset cases is accounted for by non-Hispanic Black individuals (9 of 109 [8.3 percent] vs 11 of 276 [4.0 percent]; P = 0.04). Patients with early-onset AC have slightly higher chances of presenting with nonsilent differences in PIK3CA, SMAD3, and TSC2 compared to patients 50 years of age or older at diagnosis (PIK3CA: odds ratio [OR], 4.58; 95 percent CI, 1.72-12.21; P = .002; SMAD3: OR, 7.37; 95 percent CI, 1.24-43.87; P = .03; TSC2: OR, 12.43; 95 percent CI, 1.03-149.59; P = .047). Patients with early-onset AC, on the other hand, had a 60% decreased risk of presenting with non-silent GNAS differences compared to patients with late-onset AC (OR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.21-0.76, P = .006). By histologic subtype, young patients with appendix mucinous adenocarcinoma had a 65% decrease in the chances of GNAS variance relative to late-onset patients in the modified models (OR, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.15-0.79; P = .01). Similarly, patients with early-onset nonmucinous appendiceal adenocarcinomas had a 72% decrease in GNAS variance odds relative to late-onset cases, although these results did not achieve significance (OR, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.07-1.14; P = .08). GNAS and TP53 differences in early-onset and late-onset cases (P &amp;lt; .05) were mutually exclusive in its.<br /><br /><br /><br /> Conclusions and Pertinence:<br /> In the study, relative to AC diagnosed among older individuals, AC diagnosed among younger individuals had a distinct genomic landscape. Specifically for younger patients, the creation of therapeutic modalities that target these unique molecular features can produce clinical implications.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 08 Jul 2022 19:54:01 +0000 hansocj2 127 at https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab Genomic differences by race emerge in colorectal cancer https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab/news-media/genomic-differences-race-emerge-colorectal-cancer-0 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Genomic differences by race emerge in colorectal cancer</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/holowatyj-lab/users/hansocj2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">hansocj2</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 07/08/2022 - 14:52</span> <a href="/holowatyj-lab/blog-post-rss/126" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Genomic differences by race emerge in colorectal cancer"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-external-url field--type-link field--label-hidden field__item"><a href="https://aacrjournals.org/cancerdiscovery/article/11/6/OF1/666621/Genomic-Differences-by-Race-Emerge-in-Colorectal" target="_blank">https://aacrjournals.org/cancerdiscovery/article/11/6/OF1/666621/Genomic-Differences-by-Race-Emerge-in-Colorectal</a></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Black, white, and Asian/Pacific Islander patients with early-onset colorectal cancer have different patterns of nonsilent mutations than their late-onset counterparts, researchers have reported. Additionally, within the early-onset population, Black patients had a significantly higher tumor mutation burden (TMB) than white patients. These findings, while preliminary, offer a glimpse of the biological basis of disparities—information that could eventually have therapeutic implications.</p> <p>“Incidence rates of colorectal cancer among adults younger than age 50 years—also known as early-onset colorectal cancer—have continued to rise each year,” said Andreana Holowatyj, PhD, of the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center in Nashville, TN, who presented the findings during the first week of the virtual American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2021, being held April 10–15. At the same time, disparities have emerged: The disease is almost twice as prevalent in people who aren't white, and Black patients fare significantly worse than their white counterparts. Thus, Holowatyj's team decided to investigate molecular differences that might underlie colorectal cancer disparities in younger adults.</p> <p>The researchers analyzed genomic data from 5,475 patients with microsatellite-stable colorectal cancer in the AACR Project GENIE database, 1,592 of whom had early-onset disease. Patients were classified as non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic Black, or Asian/Pacific Islander.</p> <p>The team found that white patients with early-onset disease were more likely to have <em>LRP1B, TP53, TCF7L2, DOCK8, SMAD2</em>, and <em>SMAD3</em> mutations than white patients with late-onset disease, and they were less likely to have <em>KDR</em> and <em>FLT4</em> mutations. Black patients with early-onset cancer were four times more likely to have <em>CREBBP</em> mutations—and more likely to have <em>TGFBR2</em> mutations—than those with late-onset cancer. Asian/Pacific Islander patients with early-onset disease were 48% and 66% less likely, respectively, to have <em>APC</em> and <em>PIK3CA</em> mutations, and were 4.7 times more likely to have <em>FAT1</em> mutations than those with late-onset cancer.</p> <p>Among all patients with early-onset disease, Black patients had a significantly higher TMB than white patients. Also, the frequency of <em>LRP1B, TGFBR2, APC</em>, and <em>PIK3CA</em> mutations varied by race/ethnicity.</p> <p>“These findings suggest that there indeed are distinct genomic patterns of early-onset microsatellite-stable colorectal cancer by race,” Holowatyj said. However, validation is needed, she added—especially because the database lacks information on cancer stage, tumor grade, and survival. Additionally, future research should categorize patients based on genetic ancestry rather than self-identification of race/ethnicity.</p> <p>Holowatyj and her team will begin delving into the mechanistic underpinnings of these genomic patterns, exploring how mutations affect the formation and progression of tumors.</p> <p>“I think this study is really unique—it's outstanding work, and utilizes a great database,” said Christopher Lieu, MD, of the University of Colorado Cancer Center in Aurora, who was not involved in the research. The next step, he said, should be to link the genomic data with clinical outcomes such as survival.</p> <p>He also noted that factors other than biology contribute to disparities, such as structural barriers to healthcare. “I see this as the launching pad for even deeper research into early-onset colorectal cancer, disparities in care, and what we can do to prevent this.”</p> <p>Benjamin Weinberg, MD, of the Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center in Washington, DC, found the higher TMB in Black patients with early-onset disease intriguing. “That has a lot of potential clinical relevance,” he said, noting that the PD-1 inhibitor pembrolizumab (Keytruda; Merck) is approved by the FDA for TMB-high solid tumors.</p> <p>Weinberg, who was not connected to the research, would like to see studies move from genomics to multi-omics. “Are there differences in methylation patterns? The microbiome? Those are broader questions that we want to ask in similar patient populations.” –<em>Catherine Caruso</em></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 08 Jul 2022 19:52:40 +0000 hansocj2 126 at https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab Andreana N. Holowatyj, PhD, MS, talks AACR and the value of the annual meeting 2021 https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab/news-media/andreana-n-holowatyj-phd-ms-talks-aacr-and-value-annual-meeting-2021-0 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Andreana N. Holowatyj, PhD, MS, talks AACR and the value of the annual meeting 2021</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/holowatyj-lab/users/hansocj2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">hansocj2</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 07/08/2022 - 14:51</span> <a href="/holowatyj-lab/blog-post-rss/125" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Andreana N. Holowatyj, PhD, MS, talks AACR and the value of the annual meeting 2021"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-external-url field--type-link field--label-hidden field__item"><a href="https://www.cancernetwork.com/view/andreana-n-holowatyj-phd-ms-talks-aacr-and-the-value-of-the-annual-meeting-2021" target="_blank">https://www.cancernetwork.com/view/andreana-n-holowatyj-phd-ms-talks-aacr-and-the-value-of-the-annual-meeting-2021</a></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Andreana N. Holowatyj, PhD, MS, of the Vanderbilt University Medical Center, spoke with <em>CancerNetwork®</em> about the benefits of a conference like the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2021, and how the collaborative network of thought leaders presents ample opportunity to move the field forward.</p> <p>Transcription:</p> <p>What I think the AACR Annual Meeting does is bring together experts from a multitude of fields across the globe to really aim towards one specific goal of understanding cancer and reducing the burden of cancer worldwide. I think that’s a really unique opportunity because these different presentations, mine as well as other posters, other sessions, really afford the opportunity to forge connections and collaborations that you may not have had within your inner network. [Connecting] folks of different expertise may yield just fantastic team science and translational work to answer important questions like these in early-onset colorectal cancer. I’m most excited for that, in addition to presenting these findings, the provocative discussion that will be held both with these results and how we as a field can move forward to really make that precision medicine impact for individual patients overall. From basic science to population science, you’re really bringing together a [group] of experts to really build upon what we already know and go in ways that we may not have thought of individually.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 08 Jul 2022 19:51:20 +0000 hansocj2 125 at https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab Andreana N. Holowatyj, PhD, MS, emphasizes the complexity of her research in colorectal cancer and future opportunities https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab/news-media/andreana-n-holowatyj-phd-ms-emphasizes-complexity-her-research-colorectal-cancer-and-0 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden"> Andreana N. Holowatyj, PhD, MS, emphasizes the complexity of her research in colorectal cancer and future opportunities</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/holowatyj-lab/users/hansocj2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">hansocj2</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 07/08/2022 - 14:50</span> <a href="/holowatyj-lab/blog-post-rss/124" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Andreana N. Holowatyj, PhD, MS, emphasizes the complexity of her research in colorectal cancer and future opportunities"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-external-url field--type-link field--label-hidden field__item"><a href="https://www.cancernetwork.com/view/andreana-n-holowatyj-phd-ms-emphasizes-the-complexity-of-her-research-in-colorectal-cancer-and-future-opportunities" target="_blank">https://www.cancernetwork.com/view/andreana-n-holowatyj-phd-ms-emphasizes-the-complexity-of-her-research-in-colorectal-cancer-and-future-opportunities</a></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>In a conversation with <em>CancerNetwork®,</em> Andreana N. Holowatyj, PhD, MS, of the Vanderbilt University Medical Center, walked through the potential future research to come from her data presented at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2021, while emphasizing that race is just a small piece of a very complex puzzle for this research focusing on tumor mutation burden by race in early-onset colorectal cancer.</p> <p>Transcription:</p> <p>This is just the tip of the iceberg. Of course, these studies warrant further validation, but this work is the first of its kind in revealing molecular differences, specifically within the population of early-onset microsatellite stable colorectal cancer by race. This can start to help us understand if molecular features of the tumor may be contributing to some of these disparities in disease burden and disproportionate burden across the population groups. And our findings yield clinical implications, both in the results for tumor mutation burden differences, but also in potentially helping to develop therapeutic or prognostic markers, specifically for early-onset colorectal cancer, and [by] facilitate precision medicine for young patients diagnosed with this disease.</p> <p>I do want to acknowledge first and foremost that race is a social construct. Data on genetic ancestry are not available for GENIE cases. That’s one direction to take this work in further. In addition, it’s important to consider that race is just 1 piece of a really complex puzzle where a network of interrelated factors, both at the individual and societal level, contribute to early-onset colorectal cancer disparities. And that will be important to consider in work moving forward beyond this study. Our hope is to move this work into the pre-clinical setting at the laboratory bench and better understand some of the molecular mechanisms that may be driving some of these distinct molecular patterns that we’ve observed for the population of [patients with] early-onset colorectal cancer.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 08 Jul 2022 19:50:34 +0000 hansocj2 124 at https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab Andreana N. Holowatyj, PhD, MS, discusses focal questions regarding colorectal cancer disparities https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab/news-media/andreana-n-holowatyj-phd-ms-discusses-focal-questions-regarding-colorectal-cancer-0 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Andreana N. Holowatyj, PhD, MS, discusses focal questions regarding colorectal cancer disparities</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/holowatyj-lab/users/hansocj2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">hansocj2</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 07/08/2022 - 14:49</span> <a href="/holowatyj-lab/blog-post-rss/123" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Andreana N. Holowatyj, PhD, MS, discusses focal questions regarding colorectal cancer disparities"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-external-url field--type-link field--label-hidden field__item"><a href="https://www.cancernetwork.com/view/andreana-n-holowatyj-phd-ms-discusses-focal-questions-regarding-colorectal-cancer-disparities" target="_blank">https://www.cancernetwork.com/view/andreana-n-holowatyj-phd-ms-discusses-focal-questions-regarding-colorectal-cancer-disparities</a></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Andreana N. Holowatyj, PhD, MS, of the Vanderbilt University Medical Center, spoke with <em>CancerNetwork</em> about the focal questions from her research presented at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2021 focusing on disparities in early-onset colorectal cancer.</p> <p>Transcription:</p> <p>We sought to tackle the loaded question to understand what biological factors may be contributing to disparities in the early-onset colorectal cancer burden. To put things into perspective, overall about 1 in every 10 colorectal cancer cases is diagnosed prior to age 50. There’s been a challenge to date in accruing sufficient cases or data to be able to explore this timely and important research question as to differences within the population of early-onset colorectal cancer, particularly the molecular features. It was a really unique opportunity to leverage the resource of the AACR Project GENIE [Genomic Evidence Neoplasia Information Exchange] consortium that included both clinical-grade targeted sequencing data, and clinical demographic data on cases with a pathologically confirmed colorectal cancer diagnosis from 12 institutions worldwide, which was [a] prime opportunity to answer this research question with over 6000 colorectal cancer cases included in our study.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 08 Jul 2022 19:49:31 +0000 hansocj2 123 at https://www.vumc.org/holowatyj-lab