DBMI Centers

Vanderbilt University Medical Center's Department of Biomedical Informatics (DBMI) consists of more than 100 faculty and staff who all focus on different aspects of biomedical informatics, including precision medicine, big data, clinical informatics, education and more. 

Click the links below to view and learn more about each DBMI Center.

  • Director: Josh Peterson

    The Center for Precision Medicine (CPM) at Vanderbilt University is a multidisciplinary team consisting of basic research investigators, clinicians, data scientists, application developers and support personnel whose objective is to build a research platform that amasses, extracts and curates meaningful information from patient healthcare records and integrates it with genetic information derived from a DNA repository patterned after BioVU.

    The CPM develops and applies advanced bioinformatics tools to identify genotype/phenotype associations and genotype/treatment relationships in order to facilitate discovery and signally improve healthcare outcomes through the personalization of diagnostics, treatment and disease prevention. 

  • Co-Directors: Michael Matheny & Melissa McPheeters

    Faculty, trainees, staff and collaborators of the Center for Improving the Public's Health through Informatics (CIPHI) conduct population-based informatics research across multiple disciplines under informatics. The CIPHI has a strong affiliation with the Department of Biomedical Informatics and the VA Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, which has created this multidisciplinary and collaborative center. The CIPHI also has a strong relationship with the Middle Tennessee Research Institute (MTRI). 

  • Director: Adam Wright

    The Vanderbilt Clinical Informatics Center (VCLIC) coordinates clinical informatics activities across VUMC and is working to "pave the road" for clinical informatics researchers and practitioners, ensuring that faculty, students and staff throughout Vanderbilt find it easy to access data, test innovations and evaluate results. VCLIC also offers lectures, trainings, competitions and funding opportunities for Vanderbilt informaticians. 

  • Director: Brad Malin; Co-Director: You Chen

    The Health Information Privacy Laboratory (HIPLAB) at Vanderbilt University was founded to address the growing needs for privacy technology research and development for the emerging health information technologies sector. The goal of the HIPLAB is to improve the protection of patients' privacy in health information systems. The HIPLAB is based in the Department of Biomedical Informatics, in the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and has relationships with various departments around the university and beyond. 

    The HIPLAB performs basic, as well as applied research in a number of health-related areas, including primary care and secondary sharing of patient-specific data for research purposes. Projects in the HIPLAB are multi-faceted and draw up methodologies in computer science, the biomedical sciences and public policy. 

  • Co-Directors: Brad Malin & Chris Lindsell

    The Vanderbilt Health Data Science Center (HEADS) was established to focus on the innovation and application of data science in the biomedical domain. HEADS serves as an umbrella for, and embellishes on the work of, multiple laboratories at Vanderbilt University working in this domain. 

  • Director: Nunzia Bettinsoli Giuse

    The Center for Knowledge Management (CKM) actively contributes to the acquisition, creation, dissemination, reuse and characterization of the institution's information strata by holistically strengthening its metadata representation and evidence content. CKM scientists possess an in-depth understanding of sound practices in knowledge management, spanning a wide array of disciplines from knowledge mining, content filtering, information seeking and data organization. 

  • Director: Kim Unertl

    VUMC DBMI's Research Experience for Undergraduates Program for Access to Training in Health Informatics (REU-PATHI) provides 10 undergraduate students from diverse backgrounds the opportunity to engage in scientific research over a period of 10 weeks during the summer. The students study a range of topics, including computer and basic science, engineering, social science and precision health, and participate in a group design challenge. The program also prepares students to identify, design, develop, deploy and study innovative technology-based solutions for important health-related problems and discover different pathways into science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) careers. 

    For more information, contact Program Manager Rischelle Jenkins or visit this page here